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mrappe
December 7, 2010, 10:09 PM
I have been reading the book Gunpowder Alchemy,bombards, & Pyrotechnics: The history of the Explosive that Changed the World by Jack Kelly. It is about the history of what we now call 'Black Powder'. It is really interesting. I got a used copy from Amazon for 1.39 with 3.99 shipping. The book is a hardback and is in 'like new' condition. Well worth the price for anyone interested in BP and or history. When the Chineese were developing the first things that would latter become guns they had some interesting names for them like 'Nine-Arrow Heart-Piercing Magic-Poison Thunderous Fire Erupter' and ' Bandit-Burning Vison-Confusing Magic Fire Ball'. I am thankfull that the names have been shortened somewhat nowdays.

napp
December 7, 2010, 10:44 PM
Sounds like those Chinese fellas used a Walker Colt for testing. :D

mrappe
December 7, 2010, 11:00 PM
Wow! It must have been.

Wildalaska
December 7, 2010, 11:34 PM
When the Chineese were developing the first things that would latter become guns they had some interesting names for them like ''Nine-Arrow Heart-Piercing Magic-Poison Thunderous Fire Erupter and ' Bandit-Burning Vison-Confusing Magic Fire Ball'. I am thankfull that the names have been shortened somewhat nowdays.

Really?

How about ?
Thompson Center Renegade .50 rifle
湯普森中心雷恩加德.50步槍

Or ?

Winchester Model 70 All Weather 30-06
溫徹斯特 70型全天候30-06

as compared to
Nine-Arrow Heart-Piercing Magic-Poison Thunderous Fire Erupter
九箭心臟刺穿魔術毒雷鳴般的消防Erupter

Bandit-Burning Vison-Confusing Magic Fire Ball
土匪燒視覺混淆魔法火球


Xie Xie

WildgwailoAlaska ™©2002-2010

B.L.E.
December 8, 2010, 06:52 AM
Most languages have idiomatic phrases that lose their meaning or sound absurd when translated literally to another language.

"Male child of a firearm, we'll have great fun on the bayou!"

Hardcase
December 8, 2010, 10:16 AM
Idiogramatic languages are like that. It's kind of entertaining to see the thought behind the name.

I'm sure that, back in the day, whatever Chinese artilleryman handling the "Nine-Arrow Heart-Piercing Magic-Poison Thunderous Fire Erupter" called it that, anymore than a modern artilleryman thinks of his howitzer as a "Howitzer, Lightweight Towed 105MM M119A1". It's just a howitzer. And the Chinese guy probably had a similar name for his gun, too.

But when the symbols for your language are words, not letters, though, some pretty doggone interesting things happen.

Fiv3
December 8, 2010, 10:19 AM
Nine-Arrow Heart-Piercing Migic-Poison Thunderous Fire Erupter

I think of this:
http://civilwarhandgun.com/lemat.jpg:D

napp
December 8, 2010, 10:53 AM
Military jargon can have different meanings depending upon your service/branch. An M60 is not the same to an Infantryman as an M60 is to a tanker. Likewise, a P38 for an Army guy is totally different than a P38 for a WWII aviator.

mrappe
December 8, 2010, 11:05 AM
We could have today a weapon called:

Springfield Armory
U.S. Errupter, Caliber .30, M1

Chris_B
December 9, 2010, 07:08 PM
Likewise, a P38 for an Army guy is totally different than a P38 for a WWII aviator.

Not at all. They were both can openers to the dogface and the flyboy ;)

But a P-38 and a P.38, now we are talking differences ;)

Tanker6
December 9, 2010, 08:21 PM
An M60 is not the same to an Infantryman as an M60 is to a tanker.

Ok, since we're being nit-picky......:o

An M-60 to an infantryman is a 7.62 machinegun. Heavy bast*rd....I toted one in the light infantry as a 17 y/o.

An M-60 tank would need the A1, A2, or A3 designation to be correct. M-60A1 had a 105mm main gun with a "coincidence" rangefinder (two optics which when brought together in the sighting system used parallax to induce the range to the target) (aside....we used to say it was a "coincidence" if you got the right range :D). M-60A2 had that goofy Shallelagh missile system (same as the Sheridan) inside a 152mm main gun. The M-60A3 went back to the 105 mm main gun, but had a laser rangefinder (and the TTS Thermal sight) installed.

After trudging for 6 months as a grunt, I got the opportunity to go back to school, earn my degree, and get a commission. I branched Armor afterward (I was not going to walk like that again :D). I was school trained on the A3, my first tank was an A1 and I stayed long enough to be on the M-1 (my first one had an "XM-1" serial number), M-1A1, and M-1A2.

Cheers!