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Allison
November 6, 2010, 07:41 PM
Not long ago I picked up a .36 cal. brass frame Leech and Rigdon type revolver. Date code is XX7 which, I think, means 1971 and it's also stamped with what looks like the end of a gun barrel with the letter U inside so maybe it's a Uberti. As far as I can tell it's never been fired and is made as well or better than my new Ubertis. There is a serial number on the frame but no corresponding number on the barrel. Did Uberti only stamp the frame back then or do I have a replacement barrel?
The chambers on this gun also measure exactly .380" (barrel grooves at .370") which kind of rules out using a .380" ball as I won't get any lead shaving. I see where Track of the Wolf offers a .389" ball and was wondering if this is too large and would be difficult to ram into the chamber? Also, would the ball (at .380") be too large for the barrel. Looking forward to shooting this one and would appreciate any advice.

Hawg
November 6, 2010, 08:11 PM
It's a Uberti. It could be the chambers were chamfered to ease loading.

Fingers McGee
November 6, 2010, 10:38 PM
Not long ago I picked up a .36 cal. brass frame Leech and Rigdon type revolver.

Which would make it a Griswold and Gunnison (or Griswold and Grier) replica.

Did Uberti only stamp the frame back then or do I have a replacement barrel?


Uberti and other manufacturers didn't always stamp the SN in the frame and barrel on the early repros.

The chambers on this gun also measure exactly .380" (barrel grooves at .370") which kind of rules out using a .380" ball as I won't get any lead shaving. I see where Track of the Wolf offers a .389" ball and was wondering if this is too large and would be difficult to ram into the chamber? Also, would the ball (at .380") be too large for the barrel. Looking forward to shooting this one and would appreciate any advice.

The chambers might be tapered. Try the .380s and see how they work. A .389 might be a little hard to load.

I've got a Uberti L&R from 1977 that has loose chambers & it shoots just fine.

Allison
November 7, 2010, 09:11 AM
Thanks for your replies. I'll try the .380" balls.
The gun has a round barrel and brass frame. Wouldn't that make
it a Leech and Rigdon? With the Griswold and Gunnison having an
octagonal barrel?
I'm going by the photos in the
DGW catalog.

Hawg
November 7, 2010, 09:27 AM
Griswold & Gunnison was a round barrel with brass frame, actually wasn't brass but bronze with a high copper content. Leech & Rigdon was a steel(iron) frame with a round barrel. Both were .36 caliber.

Fingers McGee
November 7, 2010, 11:59 AM
And the brass frame with octagonal barrel was the Schneider and Glassick. Retailers and replica makers call their products all sorts of non-historical names.

The dragoon style (half round half octagonal) barrels were found on the iron framed Leech and Rigdon, Rigdon and Ansley, CH Rigdon, Columbus Firearms Manufacturing Company, Augusta Machine Works, and J.H. Dance & Brothers revolvers.

Allison
November 7, 2010, 12:48 PM
Thanks again, guys. I appreciate your help.