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View Full Version : What to do with an M1 Garand


Drummer101
October 19, 2010, 12:10 PM
I have a Garand stilling at my FFL and I am getting it Friday.

The plan is to clean it that night and shoot it the next day.

Is there anything that I should look for or do when cleaning it?

RT
October 19, 2010, 12:12 PM
Grease
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=6525/Product/LUBRIPLATE_130_A_MIL__SPEC__GREASE

kraigwy
October 19, 2010, 12:26 PM
Congrats on your Garand:

First thing to do is go to this web site and read (study) the info on the Garand.

http://www.memorableplaces.com/m1garand/

To learn to shoot your Garand I would recommend attending a CMP GSM (Garand, Springfield, Vintage Military Rifle) Clinic taught by CMP GSM Master Instructors. These clinics cost very little, (about $20 on the average), not bad when you consider the ammo is normally provided.

Then, attend CMP Garand Matches. These old war horses deserve to be able to show us they still have it in them.

CMP GSM Clinics and Matches:

Clinics:
http://clubs.odcmp.com/cgi-bin/matchUpcomingSearch.cgi?designation=CLINIC

Matches:
http://clubs.odcmp.com/cgi-bin/matchUpcomingSearch.cgi?designation=GARAND

demigod
October 19, 2010, 01:53 PM
Put a tactical free float rail on it, a vertical fore grip, an aimpoint, a tac light, a laser, and some flip up iron sights!! Just kidding! :D

Tim R
October 19, 2010, 02:35 PM
Make sure the reciever is made by Springfield, H&R, Winchester or IHC. Any thing else don't waste your time or $.

MuzzleBlast
October 19, 2010, 02:37 PM
Clean it, grease it, shoot it and enjoy it. :)

oneshot onekill
October 19, 2010, 02:53 PM
I would just look at the brass from the first shot for signs of headspace issues. Or check it with a go-no go gauge.

BombthePeasants
October 19, 2010, 03:31 PM
I am with the other guys when they harp on grease. I never used grease on guns before getting my first M1, and now I swear by it. Plus, it's pretty much necessary for the M1. Oh, and thanks for whomever it was that posted about the CMP clinics. I am now seriously considering doing one of those instead of an Appleseed...

Drummer101
October 19, 2010, 04:14 PM
I wish I could do one of those, but none are really around Minnesota, granted winter is coming so I will look into them next year.

I dont think I will be able to the grease by this Saturday but I will do it before I shoot it again (maybe Thanksgiving or spring).

I got a Springfield service grade from the CMP.

kraigwy
October 19, 2010, 04:20 PM
thanks for whomever it was that posted about the CMP clinics. I am now seriously considering doing one of those instead of an Appleseed...

I confess, that was me. Not to say anything against Appleseed, but they are getting like high power; you need specialty guns to compete. They for the most part are geared for the souped up Ruger 10-22s.

Of Course the GSM are designed for vintage military rifles, but the CMP also had a Sporter Rimfire Program. NRA/ISU Smallbore is getting to be a rich man's sport; $1500 guns, & several hundred dollars worth of other equipment. The CMP Rimfire Sporter Programs limit the rifles to the standard 22s we all find in our closet.

Here is the Rule Book for the Rimfire Sporter Program (GSM Master Instructors also put on clinics for these, or I do anyway).

http://www.odcmp.com/Competitions/rimfire.pdf

The CMP has several outstanding programs, everyone should browse their site to see what they have available. One reason I like the CMP is their programs are for anyone, regardless of income. Seems lots of people are leaning toward the old trap shooters ideal of:

"It dosn't matter if you shoot good, and long as you look good shooting"

EdInk
October 19, 2010, 05:03 PM
The CMP offers some good competitions. They have the monopoly on Garandes that aren't junk for a price that's not absurd.

However, I think it is wrong to require people to join certain groups to buy a gun from them. That is my only real complaint about them.

Buy an adjustable gas block so you can shoot cheap off the shelf ammo.

kraigwy
October 19, 2010, 05:38 PM
I think it is wrong to require people to join certain groups to buy a gun from them. That is my only real complaint about them.

The requirements are levied by congress, not the CMP. However CMP did get the rules change, allowing, in Leu of Membership in CMP Clubs & Proof of Competition, such organizations as VFW, American Legion, Military Membership (active, reserve, NG, retired) and LE (active & retired).

Its not hard to find a CMP club, but it might cost you $5 to join. Attending CMP Clinics, Appleseed Events, HP matches and so forth.

Its not that hard. But remember, CMP and its Father, the DCM, was started to increase the marksmanship abilities of the American Citizen. The provide arms, ammunition, and training. Its up to us to take advantage of it.

Also unlike the DCM, CMP is not tax dollar funded, it funds its programs by the sales of rifles, ammo and other equipment.

Just for info, I don't own stock in the CMP, the reason I'm beating their drum is I believe its a great program, and provides a valued service to this country and its citizens.

overland
October 19, 2010, 06:58 PM
First read the enclosed CMP manual a few times. That's a 60+ year old rifle. Take it apart 2 or 3 times, learn how it functions, clean and grease it. Get familiar with it especially all the possible jams/stoppages that can occur. The CMP site has lots of good online articles about the Garand and what to do when things go wrong. Inspect it very closely to be sure it is all in order. Then enjoy it. I have two from the CMP. Use some good, new ammo to start.

Chris_B
October 19, 2010, 07:28 PM
Unless your gas system is modified, do not shoot commercial 30-06 in it unless that load is specifically made for the M1 rifle. The correct ammunition is M2 ball. I would not take anyone's word that "30-06 is 30-06 is 30-06"

There is no law that says commercial 30-06 not loaded for the Garand will cause a problem. But please be cognizant of the subtle but definite difference in M2 ball and modern commercial 30-06. Modern 30-06 not loaded specifically for the M1 rifle is too "hot". I am sure many anecdotal cases of "I shot regular 30-06 for 40 years with no problem" are out there, and I think that's fine. I also don't care; I know that the ammunition is different and there's a risk involved

Congrats on the rifle :)

Drummer101
October 19, 2010, 11:16 PM
Yea, I got some surplus stuff that will last for a bit.

Then I am going to get a new gas valve so I can fire modern stuff and make it single shot for picking up brass because I want to start re-loading sometime.

overland
October 20, 2010, 06:50 AM
The CMP manual says you can shoot commercial ammo as long as its under 180 weight. Also, check out online videos on stripping the garand. There are some excellent ones out there.

Chris_B
October 20, 2010, 11:06 AM
Do what you like

Slamfire
October 20, 2010, 03:27 PM
Is there anything that I should look for or do when cleaning it?


Grab your gas cylinder and see if it moves. Very often there is a lot of movement between the gas cylinder and barrel. When these gas cylinders get knocked off the barrel the fit between the splines and barrel channels get loose. I will typically peen the barrel channels knock the gas cylinder on (with a block of wood) the end of the barrel. Once on I don’t take the gas cylinder off for years. I want a tight fit between the gas cylinder and barrel.

Use anti seize on the gas cylinder lock screw. Get a gas cylinder wrench.

Check the fit between the rear aperture and sight base. If you can wobble the rear aperture from side to side your accuracy will be awful. Just bottom out the aperture, doe up 10 clicks and grab. If the aperture is loose the rear sight cover may be worn and the spring tension down lost, or the slide aperture is too small for the base. The easiest fix is to find a tighter sight. That may not be easy either.

The CMP manual says you can shoot commercial ammo as long as its under 180 weight. Also, check out online videos on stripping the garand. There are some excellent ones out there.

The manual is incorrect. I don't disagree with the under 180 grain rule, I shoot mostly 168's. The CMP used to issue Federal made 150 grain ammunition at the Camp Perry Garand Match. The 2001 ammunition was made to “commercial specs”. Friends of mine chronographed that stuff and it was clocking close to 2900 fps in their rifles. I personally saw malfunctions due to the stuff. The retired USMC Veteran (I think Korean War Veteran) I was scoring was so disgusted with his ammunition caused malfunctions that he just packed up his gear after rapid fire prone. His Garand was a like new all matching rifle. The CMP heard so many complaints from shooters that they performed tests and dropped the velocity. I chronographed my five saved rounds from 2002 and 2003. If you notice the stuff is close to GI ball velocities in a 26” match barrel.

Look for ammunition that is specifically meant for the Garand.

Or roll your own. I think a 150 grain with 46-47 grains IMR 4895 is a great load for a Garand.


M98 26" 1-10 Wilson Barrel


150 gr FMJBT TW 56 Ball 24 Mar 04 T = 70 ° F

Ave Vel =2680
Std Dev =31
ES = 78
Low = 2620
High = 2698
N = 6

150 gr Sierra Match HPBT 47.5 IMR 4895 CCI#34 WWII cases OAL 3.290"

24 Mar 04 T= 70 ° F

Ave Vel =2722
Std Dev =26
ES = 76
Low = 2673
High = 2749
N = 10


150 gr FMJBT 2002 John Garand Match ammo Federal mgfr

23 Aug 03 T= 80 ° F

Ave Vel =2699
Std Dev =26
ES = 69
Low = 2668
High = 2737
N = 5


150 gr FMJBT 2003 John Garand Match ammo Federal mgfr

23 Aug 03 T= 80 ° F

Ave Vel = 2773
Std Dev = 45
ES = 114
Low = 2712
High = 2826
N = 5


Grease versus oil, that debate will never end. The rule of thumb I learned for M1’s and M1a’s is LSA for winter, grease in Summer. If the weather is in the 40’s grease may gum a Garand. If the weather is in the -40’s, from what I have read, any lubricant will gum up a Garand. The rifle has to be run dry in extreme cold.

I am too old and grumpy for that extreme cold stuff, so someone will have to tell me their experience. :D

MacGille
October 20, 2010, 06:45 PM
Funny thing is that in all my years of Army service I was taught never grease the m1. Grease absorbs grit and makes a grinding compound. We shot our rifles dry (no oil) never greased 'em and had no problems with them. Of course we didn't shoot 'em much, about 2 or 3 thousand rounds a year. We did clean 'em a lot though.

Ignition Override
October 21, 2010, 01:03 AM
A photo of a Garand's cracked receiver might be on the "Surplusrifle" Garand or "Parallaxbill's" Garand forum.

The owner supposedly used commercial (US-made?) 30-06 ammo.

Drummer101
October 23, 2010, 02:42 PM
Well I got the M1 and the ammo today but wont be able to shoot till Thanks Giving I dont think :(

SN: 5817xxx from springfield armory.

It has a new production stock but it seems rather dry and rough. Is there a varnish or oil that works best?

And I have a very small amount of what looks like to be rust on the receiver under where the OP rod comes back. Is that going to be a problem?

And I can see rifling looks fairly strong, but atleast it is there. Kind of hard to tell with the limited ways to get light down it.

BombthePeasants
October 23, 2010, 04:34 PM
I personally believe in Boiled Linseed Oil. I'm willing to bet that the rust is more likely caked on cosmoline. Give it a good scrub.

dmazur
October 23, 2010, 04:49 PM
Congratulations on becoming a Garand owner!

Kind of hard to tell with the limited ways to get light down it.

One way to light up a bore is to stick a white patch in front of the bolt with the bolt locked back. If you look down the muzzle and light up the patch with a flashlight (or put the receiver under a strong desk light), you can see the bore fairly well.

It goes without saying that, since this involves looking down the bore, it would be a really good idea to make sure the chamber is empty before doing this... :)

Also, you should be aware that monkeying around with the receiver while you're occupied at the muzzle end has been known to push the follower down and release the bolt. "Garand flashlight" might be slightly better than "Garand thumb", but caution is advised anyway.

Chris_B
October 23, 2010, 08:44 PM
I had a small personal book-light with a flexible stem that was perfect for bore inspection. It was LED, too. I lost it! It was about six bucks at Cole's


It has a new production stock but it seems rather dry and rough. Is there a varnish or oil that works best?

As BombthePeasants mentions- boiled linseed oil. A linseed oil finish is one of the classic military stock finishes. 100% Tung oil is also a good military finish

Some photos of military stocks I own or have refinished with or just plain cleaned with boiled linseed oil. No varnishes or polyurethanes etc in these photos. None of them are wet. The top one is an m1 carbine; I didn't do much to that one, it just looked good right from when I bought it. The center one is a Garand obviously, I have put maybe three dozen coats of oil on that one after a fairly involved refinish. The bottom photo is an interesting one. It's an M1 carbine stock from my dad's carbine. I cleaned the stock with alcohol and then mineral spirits, and then applied a single coat of boiled linseed oil. I was surprised at how much a simple cleaning helped that stock

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/newstuff/carbinestock.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/newstuff/M1907M1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/m1carbinestock.jpg

Drummer101
October 23, 2010, 10:02 PM
That was what my dad recommended. I will have to go out and get some and next time I am in town I will do that.

TXGunNut
October 23, 2010, 10:39 PM
Nice job on the Garand, Chris. Thinkin' I need to fill out a few CMP forms and send in a check.

Drummer101
November 7, 2010, 10:26 AM
Well I am hoping to go shooting in the next few weeks so time to order some grease.

The link earlier in the thread was this one,
http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=6525/Product/LUBRIPLATE_130_A_MIL__SPEC__GREASE

Do you really need that much??
But I hope to order in the next day or 2.

And after I shoot I am going to start putting on coats of linseed.

Chris_B
November 7, 2010, 11:05 AM
Any quality grease in the right heat range will work. I like lubriplate myself; on much more than just firearms but others work as well

You don't need to have the rifle drip with grease, and not everything should be greased. As a general rule of thumb, rotating things like oil, things that slide in a line like grease. In general

Keep the grease away from the bolt face! :D