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skinsman
October 9, 2010, 03:35 PM
As I am gotten a ton of good info from this forum, I am looking for some helpfull hints. I have a .50 cal. rifle, I am hoping to be able to fill a cow tag with it although some have told me it may be too light of a cal.. Whats going to be my most effective projectile? 100 yard limit, using Triple 7 FFFG powder.
All help would be welcome.

Andy Griffith
October 9, 2010, 04:36 PM
What kind of rifle and what type of rate of twist?

skinsman
October 9, 2010, 05:41 PM
Its an investarms spa25060. Made for cabela's. No idea on the rate of twist, I puchaced this used. 50 cal. Hawkin

robhof
October 9, 2010, 07:34 PM
Most b/p rifles with a sidelock are 1-48, unless they specify for sabots which are faster 1-24 or about and the patch ball which is 1-60 or 66. The 1-48 is a compromise that will fire prb's and conicals fairly well. The different twist is usually specified on the barrel or in the instructions.

Hawg Haggen
October 9, 2010, 07:54 PM
That rifle only came with a 1:48 twist as far as I know. I used 90 grs. of Pyrodex and a Lee R.E.A.L or a maxi ball with good results. However every gun is different. You'll just have to play with different loads to see what works best in yours.

Erich
October 9, 2010, 09:30 PM
Friend of mine just turned me on to these:

http://www.prbullet.com/pts.htm

arcticap
October 10, 2010, 10:22 PM
Hornady's 300 grain and 350 grain FPB bullets are precision made slip fit, bore size, jacketed, hollow base conicals. They are reported to have good accuracy and excellent lethal performance on large game when fired from many different barrel twists.

http://www.hornady.com/store/50-Cal-300-gr-FPB/

Remove the plastic tip and they will meet the legal length in Colorado if they haven't changed the maximum length restriction there yet.

Read the customer reviews about them & their use in Colorado by clicking on the link that's located on the MidwayUSA product page below:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=910262

skinsman
October 12, 2010, 10:37 AM
Do you use a wad when shooting a conical bullet or just butt it up to the powder?

Pahoo
October 12, 2010, 10:57 AM
Do you use a wad when shooting a conical bullet or just butt it up to the powder?
I often do with mostly improved performance. It all depends on what projectile you are using. Now, when you say Conicals, you mean a non-sabot projectile. ... Right or do you mean Saboted projectiles?

Friend of mine just turned me on to these:

I prefer this basic design and a few years back, Cabelas use to carry some, much like these, minus the balistic tips. These would be a good choice. :)
I would prefer a faster twist, though ...


Be Safe !!!

skinsman
October 12, 2010, 01:36 PM
No, not sabbots. I am gonna try these first. Hornady FPB Muzzleloading Bullets 50 Caliber 300 Grain Flex Tip. I am new to this and I see using a round Ball you are supposed to use a patch, I was wondering using these if I need a wad (like a pistol) or if you can just butt the bullet up to the powder.

Pahoo
October 12, 2010, 07:48 PM
Well I guess you really do mean Conicals !!! :)
I currently shoot about three or four and yesterday, ran off a batch of Max-Balls. I also run and shoot a Maxi-Hunter and both weights of the REAL. Hornady makes a very good hunter as well. I think they call this one the great plains or something like that.

No, you do not absolutely have to use a wonder wad or bore-button. But while you are putting in some range time, try them as some of my groups have gotten better. The early mountain men use to use wasp nest material/paper. There is no safety consideration here as long as you don't short start your projectile.


Be Safe !!!

arcticap
October 13, 2010, 02:04 AM
The Hornady FPB bullets have a hollow base so there's a better chance that it will shoot well without a wad underneath it. That's because the hollow base is designed to expand when fired.

However flat based conicals may benefit more by placing a wad underneath it to act like a gas check because it seals some of the gases from blowing by the bullet when fired much like the hollow base is designed to do.

Be prepared to tap, tap, tap the FPB's to get them started into the muzzle with the help of a starter & a mallet or a block of wood. The bullet will be tight at first until it begins to get engraved upon loading.