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Genepix
September 12, 2010, 09:42 AM
I was thrilled to find a French Legionn62994aire pistol, model 1892, in absolutely fantastic condition. I will probably never fire this pistol, but am now anxious to learn more about the standard sidearm for the FFL for over forty years. The high front sight has been removed by cutting the barrel. It seems that the pistol could not be drawn from a holster quickly because of the sight, and this was fairly common practice. I would love to learn more and look forward to any and all info that might be out there. Thanks...

PetahW
September 12, 2010, 11:04 AM
As the old joke goes: Every French military firearm has been dropped at least once. ;) :p

.

Jim Watson
September 12, 2010, 11:14 AM
All I know is the Mle 1892 was the standard French sidearm from 1892 until 1935, although supplemented by Spanish revolvers and autos during WW I.

I never heard of a French Foreign Legionnaire sawing off the barrel to remove the front sight for a faster draw. But people get funny ideas and do funny things.

tater134
September 12, 2010, 11:31 AM
Shame about the chopped barrel.Looks like a nice piece otherwise though.I think Fiocchi? makes 8mm ammo for these pistols along with one or two other companies.Id just have a gunsmith attach a front sight and go shoot it.In its current state its more of a shooter than a collectible anyway.

Genepix
September 12, 2010, 12:49 PM
Since there were so many of these pistols made, I wonder if there might be a source for parts- i.e., complete barrel to put it back to original appearance.. Any thoughts?

tater134
September 12, 2010, 01:06 PM
Since there were so many of these pistols made, I wonder if there might be a source for parts- i.e., complete barrel to put it back to original appearance.. Any thoughts?

You might be able to find a junker pistol to take a barrel off of.Ive never seen just a barrel for sale but you could try checking some of the parts suppliers like Numrich or Sarco to see if they have any.

Genepix
September 12, 2010, 01:11 PM
Thanks...

aarondhgraham
September 12, 2010, 02:28 PM
It's styling is so heavily mechanical,,,
It always reminded me of a steam locomotive.

I shoot mine every now and then,,,
I buy Fiocchi ammunition through Midway (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=680038).

I also have a bit of reloading data,,,
http://www.aarondgraham.com/pics/lebeldata.jpg

A few months ago I saw another one at a gun show,,,
The guy only wanted $125 for it,,,
And I had $20 in my wallet.

.

Genepix
September 12, 2010, 03:54 PM
Awesome.

RJay
September 12, 2010, 08:25 PM
No French Legionnaire would ever modify a issue firearm. The French Legionaries were very strict and with no sense of humor in such matters. If the barrel was cut down it was done by someone other than the French military.

Genepix
September 13, 2010, 05:46 PM
It is an interesting topic- Why would one remove a sight from a light revolver? I can see some credence to the holster issue, but what about the accuracy issue? I now wonder which would be best- leave it alone, or replace the barrel with a 100% complete one.....I bought it because I thought it was interesting history...Any thoughts? Collectors?

SigP6Carry
September 13, 2010, 05:53 PM
Why is it that every european revolver from before the 40's looks the same? It's a beautiful gun, though.

James K
September 14, 2010, 05:39 PM
Partly because many of the designs originated with Nagant in Belgium.

Jim

noelf2
September 15, 2010, 07:25 PM
Partly because many of the designs originated with Nagant in Belgium.

Then it probably had a trigger pull from hell too! NICE pistol !!!

Jim Watson
September 15, 2010, 07:35 PM
The only one I ever fooled with had a pretty stout trigger pull due to enough mainspring to whack 1892 primers hard enough. Nothing like the Russian Nagant, though; the others did not go for the gas seal complication.

James K
September 16, 2010, 11:42 AM
I agree with RJay that the Foreign Legion story is very unlikely. The Legion was famous for its rigid discipline and I suspect any trooper who cut up his revolver would have been taking a long hike across the desert with a pack full of rocks.

But those were very good revolvers, solid and reliable. If given the choice of a combat revolver, I think I would rather have had a French Modele 1892 than a U.S. Model 1892.

Jim

Famas
September 19, 2010, 11:03 AM
Partly because many of the designs originated with Nagant in Belgium.

I thought the Lebel (1892) revolver appear before the Nagant (1895).

Jim Watson
September 19, 2010, 11:17 AM
The 1895 Russian gas seal Nagant was not the only Nagant revolver.

Belgium adopted the 1878 Nagant and Sweden the 1882. Both made by Nagant, but without the complicated gas seal action.

gyvel
September 19, 2010, 12:39 PM
Why is it that every european revolver from before the 40's looks the same? It's a beautiful gun, though.

They were modifications of an existing design. Many Euro revolvers, as well as the "modern" [i.e. post-William Mason abortions] double action Colts, were based on the Chamelot-Delvigne designed lockwork.