PDA

View Full Version : Snap caps for cap and ball pistols?


mrappe
September 4, 2010, 12:46 PM
Does anyone make these? if not I was I was thinking about trying to make some. Any ideas?

Mike

wogpotter
September 4, 2010, 03:21 PM
Are you thinking of replacing the nipples, or having some kind of slip-over widget?
There is a nipple cover ring (for lack of a better term) that will maybe do the job, but I don't think it'll last too long being made of some kind of plastic.

CajunPowder
September 4, 2010, 11:28 PM
I think snap-caps for a cap and ball revolver could certainly be a viable product.

If they were a rubber "nipple" perhaps a piece of rubber seated into a metal base that had threads, I think it would be a commercially viable product.

If it is ONLY a slip over, a rubber cap, that might sell as well.

I'd like to have some for sure. There are a lot of dry fire exercises to improve accuracy that I just won't do on my pietta 1858 target because I know the hammer and nipples will peen fo sho nuff.

Noz
September 7, 2010, 09:04 AM
A simple "snap cap" arraingement for a colt repro is a piece of 5/16-1/4" leather cut to fit into the channel under the curve of the hammer. The hammer will fall but will be caught by the cushion of the leather before it contacts the caps.
Works.

Support_and_Defend
September 7, 2010, 09:22 AM
I would be careful with that, Noz. I don't know if this is normal or not, but on my 1851 Navy replica, if the hammer does not fall forward enough, it locks up completely. I can't pull the hammer back until it goes forward enough to clear whatever in the trigger mechanism is locking it. Something in the curved channel under the hammer on my gun would keep the hammer from going all the way forward and would lock up my gun.

Noz
September 7, 2010, 02:03 PM
Never heard of that, which of course means it could not possibly be so.:D It works with all of my 1860s.

Rifleman1776
September 7, 2010, 02:20 PM
For target use, which means a lot of shooting, nipples should be changed fairly frequently anyway. Just keep an old set of nipples and do your dry firing on those.
BTW, a good quality nipple wrench is invaluable.

Andy Griffith
September 7, 2010, 02:42 PM
How long do nipples supposedly last?

I've got perhaps 1000rds. through a steel frame 1851-style in .44 and haven't bradded them up at all yet, but then I've never dry fired it. I've got a set of Ampco nipples to try on one of my guns, but I haven't yet because I've never had any problems...yet.

I honestly think it takes a lot of shooting to wear out nipples, anyway- wouldn't it be the flash hole to get too large first? You'd start noticing the hammer flying to half-cock. Dry firing though, perahps not a lot.

aarondhgraham
September 7, 2010, 02:47 PM
I would be careful with that, Noz. I don't know if this is normal or not, but on my 1851 Navy replica, if the hammer does not fall forward enough, it locks up completely. I can't pull the hammer back until it goes forward enough to clear whatever in the trigger mechanism is locking it.

Remove the nipples first,,,
That should give the hammer room to drop enough.

Then rubber cement the leather to the cylinder,,,
The rubber cement will rub right off when you are ready to reinsert the nipples.

.

mykeal
September 7, 2010, 06:52 PM
wouldn't it be the flash hole to get too large first?
Yes. Two symptoms to note: the hammer fly-back as noted, and increasing number of FTF's, where the cap ignites but the main charge doesn't.

Gbro
September 8, 2010, 09:33 AM
If your revolver is set up right the hammer should not strike the nipples. It will hit down on the radius for Colt repos and the cylinder hammer notch on others.

RWBlue01
September 8, 2010, 09:44 PM
Lowes sells a rubber grip compound?

madcratebuilder
September 9, 2010, 06:21 AM
If your revolver is set up right the hammer should not strike the nipples. It will hit down on the radius for Colt repos and the cylinder hammer notch on others.

yup.

If the hammer is hitting the nipples just remove them for dry fire practice.

Don P
September 9, 2010, 06:34 AM
Snap caps for cap and ball pistols?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Does anyone make these? if not I was I was thinking about trying to make some. Any ideas?

Is this for real?:confused: The title answers its own question.:eek: Oh boy here we go again.:rolleyes:

Rifleman1776
September 9, 2010, 08:41 AM
Gbro is absolutely correct.
I didn't mention it because it is a very rare out of the box C&B revolver that is really properly set up that way. These pistols can be tuned to do that.
Plus/but other factors can come into play. e.g. not all nipples from different manufacturers are identical. Where the hammer may not strike with one brand, it might with another.
Banging up the nipples with use is not the problem, burn out is the problem. Probably not a big issue with pistols. But bench rest ML shooters can see the difference and many are obsessive about changing nipples before big competitions.

enyaw
September 9, 2010, 09:03 AM
If I wanted to dry fire a cap&baller I'd change the length of the hammer nose to be a few .001's in. short of the nipples when the cylinder is pulled all the way forward. Of course the hammer would need re-hardened after the dimension change.
Some cap&ballers are already "dry fire safe" out of the box. I'd check that first to see if they are and if they were I'd dry fire away.
I've noticed some Piettas are "dry fire safe" out of the box. Some aren't.
It seems the higher quality cap&ballers are made "dry fire safe" out of the box.
I've several that are "dry fire safe". One notable revolver is a "top quality" Italian gun. Well I'd imagine it to be Italian but there are no makers marks on it. It's an 1861 Colt style.
The gun has masterful Nimski/Young type engraving about 85% coverage. Beautiful work of art. Engraved by a true master of the art. Part of it's worth is it is tuned to near perfection and one trait of the "tune" is that it's "dry fire safe". The other trait besides the action in perfect time,index,alignment ect.ect. it that it was made to be sighted to shoot point of aim/point of impact the same. It's a real treasure. I bought it at a "swappers day" type event where guns are sold as well as other flee market type stuff. Paid $250 for the gun. Very little handling marks on it. French grey frame,rich high grade bluing to the cylinder,barrel,backstrap ect.ect.
Anyway, higher grade cap&ballers are set up to be "dry fire safe". I've included that trait to the list of requirements a cap&baller has to have to be "tuned" by me for people wanting the near perfect action to their cap&baller. That's besides the point though. I only mention that as a way to brag on myself(why not?) but mostly to tell that the "dry fire safe" cap&baller trait is attainable if you can hone down the nose of a hammer and reharden it. Kasinet(sold at Brownells gunsmithing supply) is a good way for a "Kitchen Table Gunsmith" to get an acceptable hardening back to a hammer nose. That doesn't make the hammer nose impervious to nipple impressions though. It would be difficult to harden a "stock" hammer well enough to not be peened by the nipples during dry firing. A new hammer fashioned from a higher grade carbon steel may be made to be impervious to nipple damsage. That would be work for someone with a lot of extra time on their hands.
Anyway there are several ways to make a gun "dry fire safe". The hammer nose honed down. A spot of weld in the hammers channel that's honed to the right height. Nipple recesses deepened with an end cut/bottom cut end mill on a milling machine. Nipples themselves shortened at the cones. "Cones" are another name for nipples.
Anyway the easiest way to be safe on the gun when dry firing for practice or play would be to remove the nipples from the gun.
Personally I'd thunk that "snap caps" for cap&ball revolvers for sale on the retail market would be a total failure in the sales department and very difficult to make and be viable and to last any time at all.
I'd imagine using leather as a cushion would be too short lived as leather compresses and stays thinned afterwards. When would a person know to stop dry firing and change the leather before damage to the hammer and/or nipples accured?

mrappe
September 9, 2010, 03:58 PM
I think taking the nipples out for dry firing is probably the best idea. Now if I could just that last nipple out.

Support_and_Defend
September 9, 2010, 06:06 PM
I think taking the nipples out for dry firing is probably the best idea. Now if I could just that last nipple out.

http://www.tdcmfg.com/cgi-bin/cart/agora.cgi?cart_id=2138636.9995*XY7gk6&p_id=E-RATCHET&xm=on&ppinc=search2

http://www.tdcmfg.com/cartimages/RATCHET.jpg

Positively the best nipple wrench available!

Slowhand
September 10, 2010, 08:12 PM
Support and Defend

Thanks for the link. I've been considering getting another type of Nipple Wrench. I have about a half dozen different types now, so what's another one? I ordered one "just in case". You know what I mean if you've waded through the range box looking for the one that works, when a nipple even starts to feel "stuck". Nipple wrenches are like screw drivers, you just can't have one.

Support_and_Defend
September 11, 2010, 11:19 AM
The nipple adapter has a standard hex size head that will fit into a regular socket. If you had to, I'll bet you could put your cylinder in a vice, put the adapter in a socket and the socket on a 3 foot cheater bar and you would break the nipple off before that adapter gave way!

Slowhand
September 11, 2010, 01:52 PM
OK
:)
So just shy of whacking it with a 10 lb sledge hammer it ought to get the job done. Sounds like something I could have used in the past. Thanks.

onetuza
June 14, 2011, 12:38 PM
I wonder if these could work?

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://imagethumbnails.milo.com/003/222/190/290/3222960_3257190_290.jpg&imgrefurl=http://milo.com/closetmaid-end-caps-for-maximum-load-shelving&usg=__2nrULb9ri21M2QEnEgwTC2NncY8=&h=278&w=290&sz=7&hl=en&start=10&zoom=1&itbs=1&tbnid=gk7bFmqYFD4m_M:&tbnh=110&tbnw=115&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dvinyl%2Bshelving%2Bend%2Bcaps%253F%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX%26tbm%3Disch%26prmd%3Divns&ei=rpv3TeixH-ndiAK-4On-DA

kadima
June 16, 2011, 03:55 AM
I have a friend with a lathe who turned a few brass "false nipples" for dry firing exercise. Since I have a second cylinder (never used it, just came with the pistol in the same deal) for my Uberti made 1858 Remington, I fitthed the false nipples on it and I am happy with the results...

K.

Gatofeo
June 19, 2011, 05:13 PM
I just remove the nipples for dry firing. It's simple and it works.
I haven't seen the need for anything else.

sltm1
June 20, 2011, 07:30 PM
I'm surprised nobody brought this up yet. Why would you feel the need to dryfire? Is the western movie you're watching that exciting? Dryfiring won't teach you as fast as live firing anymore than bench shooting will help you shoot better offhand. (some of you will argue with that I'm sure). When you dryfire, you're slamming the hammer against the frame if it's not busy pancaking your nipples cause you removed them and as a blacksmith, I can assure you that repeated hammering on metal will give you a result of some sort eventually, whether you want one or not (as in slop with the hammer in the hammer channel). Oh, and if you're thinking, "I'll have better control and be more used to trigger break or creep when I shoot live rounds", that too is erroneous, nobody flinches or holds their breath till they turn blue when dry firing...nuff said.

mykeal
June 21, 2011, 05:46 AM
deleted. wrong thread.:eek: