PDA

View Full Version : Mutton Tallow- Need a pound


CameronP
August 25, 2010, 07:15 PM
I purchased mutton tallow from Dixie Gunworks a few years back but it appears they no longer carry it. Trying to use "Gatefo's" recipe for cap and ball wad lube.
Anyone know of another source?

noelf2
August 25, 2010, 07:34 PM
Skip the tallow. 50/50 crisco and beeswax. When I butcher a goat, I render my own tallow, but it doesn't really work much better than crisco/beeswax. Use more crisco for softer lube, less for more solid lube.

bedbugbilly
August 25, 2010, 09:05 PM
noelf2 - a + to the beeswax and crisco from this campfire. :) I usually use a 1 pound can of Crisco mixed with the beeswax from a toilet ring. I use the entire ring. I found the easiest way to prepare it was to use a large plastic container, like a tupperware bowl or similar, scoop out the Crisco and put that in the container along with the wax from the ring. I then microwave it until it all melts. Then I take it out, make sure it is stirred together well and ladle it into containers like empty musket cap tins, etc. and then let it set until it solidifies. I find it works great. I sometimes use felt wads over the powder and sometines leather that I punch out of scrap leather from my holster making, etc. that is about the same thickness as the felt wads. I use a cheap wire strainer with a handle like you'd use in the kitchen and then dipped them into the hot mixture and let them soak. Then I dump them on to a paper towel and "blot" them with another one. It lubes them good but doesn't over do it and they seem to work great as a wad for over the powder and under the ball. I seal the balls in the chambers with the same mixture. I've heard others say that they use the same mixture as well. It works out great for me and a pound of Crisco with the toilet ring provides enough for a lot of shooting. The nice thing is that the mixture, like you say, can be adjusted for "stiffness" depending upon the weather temperatures, etc. :)

wittzo
August 25, 2010, 11:06 PM
I use lard as a tallow substitute. Same thing, different critter.

Noz
August 26, 2010, 08:47 AM
Bed Bug, I use pearl lube, 1 pt toilet ring, 1 part soy wax(cheap from a candle maker store) and 1/2 part vegetable shortening(read the label and avoid those with salt) just as you use your mixture.
I punch my wads from felt ordered from durofelt products. An 11mm punch from Harbor Freight works well. $15 worth of felt will more than cover a year of heavy cowboy shooting. I lube them essentially as you do.
I've recently carried the lube use a bit further and lube the arbor on my 1860s with it. The arbors are the cleanest I've ever had in several years of shooting.

The problem with using lard is 1. Salt content and 2. if the mix is not used rapidly the lard can go rancid. You don't want to go there(rancid).

I threw a leftover red candle stub from a Christmas decoration to give me some color in my last lube batch. I was pleasantly surprised that my lube smells like strawberries.

Jbar4Ranch
August 26, 2010, 08:59 AM
As Noz stated, Pearl Lube consisting of Crisco, soy wax, and a dab of lanolin works quite well too.

crgator
August 26, 2010, 09:39 AM
I ordered some of this, LA0410 Old Zip Patch Grease (https://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?products_id=3689&osCsid=1f7b5951b7497c2bb8188da89bef135e), from Dixie Gun Works. I haven't tried it yet, but am hoping it does the job.

"This is a mutton tallow/beeswax combination that can be stored in either patchbox or grease hole. Withstands high temperatures without melting. It is the formula used by the likes of A.O. “Pop” Niedner, Ned Roberts, and Walter M.Cline, and by the Marlin Firearms Co. and Massachusetts Arms Co. The French, Swiss, American and British governments also used this grease to lubricate the bullets for their early black powder cartridge military firearms. The primary use today is for greasing cloth patches." Sold in 4 oz. can for $3.50.

simonkenton
August 26, 2010, 11:47 AM
I have been using Old Zip for years.
It works great!
Keeps a long time, and smells good too.

wittzo
August 26, 2010, 05:08 PM
My lard doesn't have salt and it hasn't gone bad after 4 years. I didn't even think about salt when I bought it, it was just cheap for a lifetime's supply of lube. And my pancakes taste better. :)

Some people use olive oil, too. It doesn't go rancid and it smells nice and it's good in my black beans and rice. :)

tripe1917
August 27, 2010, 01:02 AM
I still have several jars of Gatfeo's recipe remaining, but I found an on-line source at this sitehttp://www.baar.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=001&Product_Code=3780
I have never ordered from them, but it seems this tallow is 100% pure. Maybe this helps.

HiBC
August 27, 2010, 02:06 AM
A world traveling friend visited a while back,he told me some about eating mutton.He explained mutton fat has the highest meting temp of the meat fats,and that is why it is best eaten quite hot,and with the fat well skimmed.
Funny,I thought of BPCR.I was just on Dixie's site,and they still show it.Bummer.There are sheep feed lots and processors around.I may have to render my own.