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View Full Version : Why do you think the 45-70 curved stock plate is worse than another shape?


a1bigtuna
July 12, 2010, 01:19 AM
I have only fired my IAB Sharps 45-70 some 14 times (standard factory Win 300 gr hp so was a light load) and have heard about the brutal recoil of the real heavy loads and was wondering why I keep seeing remarks about the curved buttplates raising hell in recoil pain. How much difference a different shape plate would make? I was worried and before I fired my low level Win 300 gr rounds added a Limbsaver recoil pad and found that the recoil was so little that I was wondering if it was anywhere near a 30 cal carbine, which I had back in the 50's. Now I expect to load up some hotter, what seems to be the difference between a different stock plate?

HisSoldier
July 12, 2010, 07:12 PM
I've been thinking about buying a Sharps reproduction, and heard that the 45-120 had brutal recoil, that 45-70 should have about half as much. With such a heavy rifle I can't imagine the 45-70 being that uncomfortable to shoot with a curved buttplate. Please let us know what you find out. How do you like the quality of the IAB?

Hawg Haggen
July 12, 2010, 08:02 PM
A lot of people don't know how to shoot them and put the curved plate on their shoulder. The curved plate goes against your upper arm so the points don't dig in. Also if you hold it loosely it will stomp a mud hole in your butt.

a1bigtuna
July 12, 2010, 08:26 PM
My IAB is fine, but it was bought from a guy that had worked on it. I see nothing wrong with the wood, or fit, or metal. The Malcom scope is going to have to get the sliding mount addition as the recoil does move the scope. I need to shoot it some more before I do that. I have a Limbsaver recoil pad on it and the 300gr at 1800 fps was not a kicker at all, a real surprise, a good one.
Today, I just bought a new Marlin 1895CB 45-70 lever gun 26" barrel with 9 rounds in the tube magazine. Will have to wait the 10 days until I can try that out. Bought that because I can load up to what ever load I can stand, just for the heck of it and don't want to get on the wrong side of bad trying a little hotter rounds in the falling block. This new one is supposed to have newer deeper Ballard groves.
Time will tell on the IAB, but now is seem just fine. But, have read that getting a good one is iffy, this one is a year or so old.

4V50 Gary
July 12, 2010, 08:29 PM
What Hawg Haggens says.

That and curved buttplates are leftovers from the old, third generation longrifles (the first being the early ones with almost military like buttplates, the second being a bit more curved, longer barrel and slimmer profile and the third with more inlays, less wood carving and distinct, crescent shaped buttplates).

Hardcase
July 12, 2010, 09:49 PM
A lot of people don't know how to shoot them and put the curved plate on their shoulder. The curved plate goes against your upper arm so the points don't dig in. Also if you hold it loosely it will stomp a mud hole in your butt.

That reminds me of shooting over the 4th of July. I had my Winchester 1894 up with us and my sister was about to take a shot to show my nephew that it wasn't so bad (it's a .32 WS). Right before she was ready to pull the trigger, three or four of us realized that the butt was about half an inch off her shoulder. I think our yelling scared her :p At least she didn't shoot!

My nephew wimped out.

Hawg Haggen
July 13, 2010, 03:48 AM
Right before she was ready to pull the trigger, three or four of us realized that the butt was about half an inch off her shoulder. I think our yelling scared her At least she didn't shoot!


Wouldn't have hurt anything. I shoot everything like that. I learned that way because I couldn't reach the trigger with it on my shoulder.

4V50 Gary
July 16, 2010, 09:06 PM
Wouldn't have hurt anything. I shoot everything like that. I learned that way because I couldn't reach the trigger with it on my shoulder.

Depends on the caliber. Those .58 caliber muzzle loading Civil War guns would kick if you kept them off the shoulder. I read soldiers' complained about bruised shoulders after a battle. Snug it up and it's no problem. IMO, riding the recoil is better than having a sudden kick.

MJN77
July 16, 2010, 10:06 PM
I have a Marlin 1895CB .45-70. The first day I got it, I loaded up 9 Hornady Leverevolution rounds and let her go. It was less recoil than I expected (never shot a .45-70 before). My wife wanted to shoot it. I told her it kicked about like a 12 guage shotgun. She fired one shot. It made her cry a little. Now, to put it in context she is a 6 ft. Texas broad that shoots .30-30s, shotguns, and .45 colt pistols. No gun has ever made her tear up before, not even a 12 guage shotgun. I guess some people feel recoil differently.

Hawg Haggen
July 17, 2010, 02:46 AM
Depends on the caliber. Those .58 caliber muzzle loading Civil War guns would kick if you kept them off the shoulder. I read soldiers' complained about bruised shoulders after a battle. Snug it up and it's no problem. IMO, riding the recoil is better than having a sudden kick.

Nah, got one and an original. Original charges are pretty light at 60 grs. for Federal loads and 65 for Confederate loads. Bump it up to 120 and it'll thump ya a lil bit.:D

One on top is a repro, second is an Original Tower dated 1861.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y269/rebel727/03A3/target.jpg

KySilverado
July 17, 2010, 07:56 AM
Hawg Haggen has it right. Its the points. I have a Uberti 1885 in 45/70. If you don't have the gun planted in the right position you are in for some pain. I've had the bruises to prove it.

This was right after one of my first shooting sessions. I'm seriously considering a recoil pad :D

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii21/KySilverado/IMG_1029Large.jpg