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SGT Shupe
July 9, 2010, 03:33 PM
Hi folks, I'm new here and I have a question:

I recently acquired a 9mm Luger P-08 that I was told was a "Russian capture" and I'm trying to figure out its value. The original serial number (3667) has been crossed out and restamped with serial # 3203. The Luger is in beautiful and excellent condition. It also bears two eagle marks on the right side of the frame with the number '655' below each one. The restamped serial number recurs with the last two numbers '03' on the smaller parts,indicating matching part numbers. It's dated 1940 on the top of the chamber, but has '42' stamped on the toggle. It does not have DWM marks that I know of.

Does anyone have a clue as to its approximate value?

Thanks,
SGT Eric Shuping,
US Army

Drachenstein
July 9, 2010, 03:59 PM
Hey Eric how you doing. I'm wondering if your the same Sgt. Eric Shuping I know in the Army. Does a gold and black badge of a tower surounded by oak leaves mean anthing to you?

In answer to your question sounds like you've acquired a Russian capture 1940 Mauser Luger. It is a mismatch or should I say a russian rematch, and I would guess it's been dipped. It's a fairly common piece. Even shooters aren't cheap, without pictures, or seeing it's condition $450-$725. It's odd they would renumber the serial number though, I'm wondering if it's a VOPO considering the condition you state it's in. Is the handle black plastic with a bullseye in the upper center?

Frank

jonnyc
July 9, 2010, 10:31 PM
Whether a Vopo or Russian rework, if in good shooting condition, it's worth a good $600-750.

James K
July 9, 2010, 10:58 PM
1940 is the year the gun was made. 42 is the code for the Mauser plant at Oberndorf a/N. They later used S/42 and byf.

655 is the number of the Heereswaffenamt (Army Weapons Office) inspector assigned to Mauser at that time. Obviously one man didn't mark all those parts, but he was head of the inspection team and the responsible officer. (In fact, the actual marking was done by Mauser employees when parts passed gauge tests.) The real identities of those inspectors was secret at the time and today is generally unknown.

Jim

SGT Shupe
July 10, 2010, 01:37 AM
Hi Lothair. Yes, it's me. To all of you who piped in with information about my Luger, I truly appreciate it. Thanks everyone.

Eric

Drachenstein
July 10, 2010, 08:12 AM
OMG, you got stationed at Bliss? I am so sorry. Well, if you ever need anything from me you got a trump card there. I am a Luger junkie, it's my weakness. It'll put you to the head of the "to do" list.

JonnyC - it's not in my hand to look at so I gave low end and upper end. It's basically a shooter. If it's a VOPO it may have a future collectors value, as there has been interest from collectors in that catagory. If it's a russian rework it's only value is as a shooter.


GB is always an option to get up to $850 if the right moron is lurking there. Prices keep going up on these things, it's a better investment than GM stock.

Frank

SGT Shupe
July 16, 2010, 12:22 AM
Thanks Lothair. I appreciate the sentiment.

Eric

44 AMP
July 23, 2010, 01:17 PM
The s/42 on the toggle indicates that the gun (or at least the toggle) was made under military contract, by Mauser. Based on your description, its probably worth $6-700, being mismatched and likey refinished. Value on a Luger (any Luger) is highly variable, and entirely dependant on condition and the desire/pocketbook of the buyer.

I have a 1936 in mint condition, nearly all matching, but a refinish (expertly done). I paid a bit less than $800. Had the gun been original in that same condition, it would have brought 4x more money, at least.

That didn't matter to me, as I wanted a nice looking Luger, not a historically correct one. Your gun should have wood grips, and an aluminium bottom magazine, if original.

Sounds like you got a shooter, and if nice looking, a fair bargain. I have seen Lugers with NO FINISH have gone for as much as $800 in shops around here. Its not right, but it is a seller's market. You won't get big money from the gun if the buyer knows Lugers, but you don't have to get cheated, either.
And the prices are very unlikely to go down.

mapsjanhere
July 23, 2010, 01:56 PM
The worst you can do for a shooter Luger right now seems to be around $500. Not much going below that in my area unless it's severely pockmarked.

ScottRiqui
July 23, 2010, 02:02 PM
The worst you can do for a shooter Luger right now seems to be around $500. Not much going below that in my area unless it's severely pockmarked.

Oh, that's just "blood pitting" - doesn't detract from the value at all! :rolleyes:

Seriously, I'm amazed at how many sellers try to pass off garden-variety corrosion on military weapons as blood pitting.

Drachenstein
July 24, 2010, 12:59 PM
I just watched an artillery luger go for $350 at auction. Catch was it was really pitted. Pitting is more an indicator wet basements, attics, cardboard boxes and moist holsters. It's a red flag of an abused poorly maintained piece. The biggest stories though are the SS officers luger, yea right. You'll always get one with a nickeled, pearl handled presentation luger that OBTW belonged to a SS officer. A wise man once told me before you start collecting guns - collect the books on the guns.

James K
July 24, 2010, 04:09 PM
An even older saying is "buy the gun, not the story."

I sometimes wonder why guns that belonged (in reality or myth) to the SS are so valuable. In a better world, anything touched by that evil should be anathema to Americans, but it seems some folks have made the SS into some kind of "band of angels" and their possessions into objects of near worship.

I realize a gun is an amoral object, neither good nor evil, and I own Nazi era guns, but the morbid fascination with Nazism in general and the SS/SA/SD in particular is foreign to me. Yes, some "innocent" people belonged to the SS for reasons of prestige or to get a better gas ration, but the organization was comprised primarily of brutal killers, thugs whose only loyalty was to the head monster and his evil schemes.

Jim

old bear
July 30, 2010, 07:25 AM
I sometimes wonder why guns that belonged (in reality or myth) to the SS are so valuable. In a better world, anything touched by that evil should be anathema to Americans, but it seems some folks have made the SS into some kind of "band of angels" and their possessions into objects of near worship.

realize a gun is an amoral object, neither good nor evil, and I own Nazi era guns, but the morbid fascination with Nazism in general and the SS/SA/SD in particular is foreign to me. Yes, some "innocent" people belonged to the SS for reasons of prestige or to get a better gas ration, but the organization was comprised primarily of brutal killers, thugs whose only loyalty was to the head monster and his evil schemes.

Jim, AA +1. thank you