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View Full Version : Reason why you bought a brass framed BP revolver


ClemBert
July 1, 2010, 04:01 PM
A brass framed BP revolver is pretty low on my list of priorities. There are a lot of other BP revolvers I'd rather buy first. For some of you it was one of your first purchases. So the question is: What was the reason you bought a brass framed BP revolver?

jimbob86
July 1, 2010, 04:31 PM
It was on sale... like 99 bucks or something. It is still fun to shoot.

Fingers McGee
July 1, 2010, 06:33 PM
I've got a Dance and a couple Leech & Rigdons. Having at least one of each that my Southern ancestors used means I need a brass framed Schneider & Glassick, Griswold and Gunnison, and a Spiller and Burr; as well as iron framed Tucker and Sherrod, and LeMat.

Hoss Fly
July 1, 2010, 07:07 PM
Well, i got drunk at this shoot once 'n ------:o

Hawg
July 1, 2010, 07:49 PM
I've got a Dance and a couple Leech & Rigdons. Having at least one of each that my Southern ancestors used means I need a brass framed Schneider & Glassick, Griswold and Gunnison, and a Spiller and Burr; as well as iron framed Tucker and Sherrod, and LeMat.

Hmmm, need a Starr and an Adams is a must. Maybe a Manhatten and a Bacon.

bedbugbilly
July 1, 2010, 08:03 PM
You mean to say they make BP revolvers with brass frames??? :D

I much prefer steel frames but like most, the two brass framed ones that I have (early Navy Arms short round barreled '51 Navy style and a ASM '62 Pocket Police) I bought because I had a weak moment and the price was low enough that I couldn't pass them up. I have just as much fun shooting them as I do my steel frames . . . . and after all . . . that's what it is all about - fun! The cheaper brass frames are an easy way for a beginner to get their feet wet and see if they like the hobby or not and some folks just like the looks of them (they can be handsome!). As I said, it's all about fun and after 45+ years of shooting BP, I'm still having fun! :)

Hardcase
July 1, 2010, 09:44 PM
I don't have one, but if the price was right, I wouldn't hesitate to jump at it. I don't supersize my loads, so I wouldn't be worried about blasting one apart.

Fingers McGee
July 1, 2010, 11:00 PM
Hmmm, need a Starr and an Adams is a must. Maybe a Manhatten and a Bacon.

And there's also the Whitney, Shawk & McLanahan, Cofer, Columbus Firearms Manufacturing Co, Kerr English revolver, Deane English revolver, and Tranter English revolver; but they don't make replicas of those. Cost of having a 'complete' collection of Southern used revolvers would be prohibitive - unless I hit the Powerball lottery.

Kadmos
July 1, 2010, 11:37 PM
I chose other.

It was actually a couple of reasons combined, it was cheap, it was there, and it looks pretty whether polished up or somewhat tarnished.

I've always liked brass in general, its just a good looking metal with tons of character.

the rifleer
July 2, 2010, 12:33 AM
They are pretty to look at and fun to shoot. As long as you keep the charge relativly low there is no problem. I don't have one, but my friend does. I had my Ruger Old Army and he had a 1858 Remington. We shot it with about 25 grains and it shot just as well as mine...

There is absolutly nothing wrong with a brass framed gun, you just can't fill the chamber to the brim with powder and cram the ball in like you can with a Ruger Old Army...

I'm looking to buy a 1851 colt pretty soon with a brass frame. It looks great and it a classic. I'm not going to shoot the snot out of it, just once a month or so and put a few rounds through it. If thats all you are doing, a brass frame will hold up just fine. :)

CajunPowder
July 2, 2010, 01:08 AM
I would LIKE to purchase one, one day, so I can risk bunging it up to experiment with timing, and trigger smoothing and one to just experiment with in the exercise of gunsmithing. It would be nice to have as a spare as well so that when you go shooting a friend can use it. Or even better, one can BRIBE a person with a bit of land outside of the city to "go have some fun and shoot BP".

Another good reason for me to purchase one is to simply have another arm around as a backup for the Remmie I will one day get.

In my opinion, one could never have TOO MANY brass remmies.
:D

madcratebuilder
July 2, 2010, 04:39 AM
If you collect replicas then you well have several brass frame Colt clones and top strap clones. Most are copies of CSA originals.

Dino.
July 2, 2010, 08:04 AM
A brass frame is a deal breaker for me.
I have no interest in owning one.

surbat6
July 2, 2010, 11:40 AM
My only brass-frame C&B revolver at the moment is a Navy Arms Reb, a fair copy of a Griswold and Gunnison. It was cheap and I wanted a Confederate-style revolver. I wouldn't pass up a Spiller and Burr at the right price. Since I have several steel-framed guns to shoot, my favorite being the 1860 Colt repros, so the brass-framed one(s) are shot a little and enjoyed a lot.

Noz
July 2, 2010, 03:07 PM
I didn't know any better.

idaram
July 2, 2010, 03:14 PM
Have a Griswold & Gunnison, Schineder & Glassic, Leech & Ridgon, Spiller & Burr. Would like a LeMat, and a .36 Dance. (Have to go to England for the Dance. Henry Krank has them.)

Have a great 4th!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

P.S. My GGGGG uncle was M.A. Baker of Fayetteville N.C. He converted a lot of flintlocks to percussion for the Confederacy.

Andy

Hawg
July 2, 2010, 05:32 PM
And there's also the Whitney, Shawk & McLanahan, Cofer, Columbus Firearms Manufacturing Co, Kerr English revolver, Deane English revolver, and Tranter English revolver; but they don't make replicas of those.


I don't believe they make clones of the Sherrod or Tucker either but you mentioned them.:p:D

mjsmith1223
July 2, 2010, 07:58 PM
I got it for free. That seemed like the right price to me. It's a lot of fun to shoot. I keep the powder charge at around 20 grains of 3F so there's no worries about damaging the frame. When I take it to the range it seems to always attract some attention because it looks like something straight out of a Clint Eastwood movie.

Fingers McGee
July 2, 2010, 10:11 PM
I don't believe they make clones of the Sherrod or Tucker either but you mentioned them

Uberti made some Sherrod & Tucker repros. Madcratebuilder managed to pick up a cased set one last year & there was an NIB one that went on GB last year for around $500 IIRC. I'm still on the lookout for one.

madcratebuilder
July 3, 2010, 06:03 AM
Did someone mention a Tucker & Sherrard 2nd model Colt Dragoon?

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d37/madcratebuilder/texasdragoon2.jpg

Uberti made these for Western Arms out of NM.

Hawg
July 3, 2010, 11:38 AM
Very nice.:cool:

Newton24b
July 3, 2010, 03:47 PM
if brass frames are of such limited use and need, then why is it that whenever a shot up and shot loose one gets on online auctions, its always priced the same as a nib walker?


seriously, never had a single person ever want to sell out a brasser, even a shot out one, for part value.

Hawg
July 3, 2010, 03:54 PM
Because people go nuts on auctions. Ebay used to be full of them parted out and the prices they were getting for one gun you could buy two new ones for.

Hawg
July 3, 2010, 04:51 PM
I only have one brass frame and it was a freebie, a Remington police in .36. I'd like to have some of the true Southern clones tho.

Fingers McGee
July 3, 2010, 11:00 PM
Did someone mention a Tucker & Sherrard 2nd model Colt Dragoon?


Show off :D

Smokin_Gun
July 4, 2010, 01:52 AM
That MCB is a fancy dresser ain't he :O)

Nice one MCB...

Smokin_Gun
July 4, 2010, 02:02 AM
Cause that's the only way a Spiller&Burr comes... :O)

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c277/Smokin_Gun/2010%20Summer/ColtNavyCartwithSpillerBurr2.jpg

ClemBert
July 14, 2010, 03:46 PM
Poll is now closed. The most popular response to the poll:

It was the cheapest BP revolver I could afford at the time.

I kind of figured that response would rank pretty high on the list.

sixgun67
July 14, 2010, 04:40 PM
Yep, that's my reason. Cheapest one I could find to start black powder handgunning with, and looks weren't bad either. 1851 Confederate Navy round barrel .44

Hawg
July 14, 2010, 05:05 PM
1851 Confederate Navy round barrel .44

That would be a Griswold and Gunnison. Only bad part is none of the original brass frames were made in .44. Actually they weren't really brass but bronze with a high copper content.

crgator
July 18, 2010, 08:12 PM
The price was right. Didn't want to spend too much until I was sure I would like shooting c&b. I don't think I went wrong with it either.

steelbird
July 19, 2010, 05:17 PM
Usually cost, visual appeal, or working on a collection that includes Confederate guns.
The other is for re-enactors or people presenting a Confederate impression.
But there were certainly plenty of Rebs in the field who would use captured Union guns - generally not enlisted men, though, as this was usually not allowed by the the CO's of either side.

Delmar
July 19, 2010, 05:24 PM
It was $70 and it was calling my name! Look real pretty and shoots OK!

Gator Weiss
July 31, 2010, 09:44 AM
You have to understand what a brass frame revolver IS, and what it is NOT, and what is it INTENDED FOR:

IT IS - a piece of history, because they did exist and were in fact used in battle.
IT IS - a shooting piece with a steel barrell and it will hit the target true to form.
IT IS - a fine looking piece because brass polishes up nice and attracts the eye.

IT IS NOT - a magnum. It must be treated as a light-loader only!
IT IS NOT - a hunter's gun, because it is a light loader.
IT IS NOT - as strong as steel, obviously.
IT IS NOT - a piece to constantly fire and fire and fire. It is soft brass. It moves over a period of time, throwing the gun loose and out of time.

IT WAS INTENDED FOR: A financially distressed military scavenging for materials with which to make arms. Some brass was available and it was used for arms accordingly, to allow the production of a sidearm.

IT WAS INTENDED FOR: Personal protection at close range only.
IT WAS INTENDED FOR: Leaving in the holster until it was absolutely needed.
IT WAS INTENDED FOR: Very little shooting over the years.

With that in mind, buying and owning a brass revolver is an OK thing to do.

If you are skirmishing in a CSA unit, the brass revolver is one of the correct revolvers because CSA issued a number of them to their troops. Loading it for skirmish with blank charges causes no barrell pressure really.

If you are a target shooter, load it light, enjoy it, and fire it a few times occasionally and put it up. It will last a long while if you dont abuse it and understand it. If it shoots loose, polish it up and hang it on the wall. It will look great up there with your horseshoes and old sickle and old iron skillets, washboards and old horse collars and bits, etc, etc.

It definitely has it's honored place in history, and it definitely has it's place in the BP shooters world. That cannot be denied.

I have bought and traded several over the last thirty years. I have fired very few of them that I owned. Mostly I bought them at reduced prices and later traded them or sold them in order to purchase other things I wanted or needed at the time. Those that I bought and sold or traded, I spent lots of time de-burring and buffing and polishing the hell out of. When people see shiny brass, they react to it and often will want to buy it or trade for it. They make good trade guns.

Doc Hoy
July 31, 2010, 11:53 AM
I'll buy that.

Rifleman1776
July 31, 2010, 12:45 PM
My very first BP gun (1976), a Remington Army .44 was in kit form and brass framed. Two reasons, I didn't know any better and it was cheap.
Of course, with price of copper and brass these days, steel framed might be cheaper and those brass frames might have serious scrap value. :rolleyes: