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View Full Version : Ruger Mini-14 for home defense?


SRT2
April 1, 2010, 11:09 PM
would the Ruger Mini-14 be a good home defense choice?

dsa1115
April 1, 2010, 11:19 PM
IMO....a shotgun would be better.

fastforty
April 1, 2010, 11:35 PM
The short barrel/overall length make it ideal for close quarters. If you live in a densely populated area, yeah, a shotgun would be better, less chance of massive over penetration.

jmortimer
April 1, 2010, 11:46 PM
Yes - reliable and handy. As good a choice as any firearm for home defense.

Come and take it.
April 1, 2010, 11:55 PM
yes

scsov509
April 2, 2010, 12:06 AM
IMO....a shotgun would be better.

A scattergun? Isn't that what most Mini's do anyway? http://www.easyfreesmileys.com/smileys/lol-049.gif (http://www.easyfreesmileys.com/facebook-smileys.html)

In all seriousness, there's nothing wrong with the Mini for home defense. I've got a side folder on mine and definitely like it for smaller spaces. There might be better options out there, but a Mini will get the job done if called upon. :D

Bamashooter
April 2, 2010, 12:16 AM
its not the first thing i would grab but, i keep a loaded 5 rd.mag for a reason. if all you had was a mini then yes i would use one in home defense. :)

Zudd
April 2, 2010, 12:58 AM
I bought mine for dealing with two legged varmints. Might be an issue with over penetration if you live close to others though.

Candiru
April 2, 2010, 01:24 AM
A Mini-14 (or any .223 carbine) loaded with softpoints is going to penetrate less drywall than a shotgun or handgun: Here's the test that shows this. (http://230grain.com/showthread.php?t=65428)

.223 carbines have a lot going for them over shotguns: They're shorter, lighter, recoil less, hold more ammo, are less susceptible to user error, can be operated one-handed, allow more precise placement of shots, are slightly quieter, and go through less drywall with proper bullet selection. That's why I chose a Mini-14 for my home defense longarm.

blume357
April 2, 2010, 06:54 AM
of choice for many survivalist types. So, I'd say yes.

GaryM&P
April 2, 2010, 07:47 AM
"its not the first thing i would grab but, i keep a loaded 5 rd.mag for a reason"

It would be even better with a 30rd mag.

NooYawkuh
April 2, 2010, 08:44 AM
Know your target (scumbag) and what is behind it (another scumbag). :D

LilHog
April 2, 2010, 09:11 AM
A mini 14 will make an excellent home defense gun. I have 2 mini's and I keep a loaded 20 round mag in the one ready to go. Besides home defense, they are a blast at the range.

DanThaMan1776
April 2, 2010, 09:14 AM
My take on home defense weapons is this: Ideally you have a 12 ga. (or 10 :cool:) shotgun. However, if this isn't the case, I would take a carbine next, then a handgun last. The simple reason is power. Statistically, missing causes plenty more bystander injuries than does over penetration. That said, I think I'll load Hornady TAP in my AR 15 and try to stay on target.

Art Eatman
April 2, 2010, 10:13 AM
In and around the home? The Mini is as good as any other rifle. The only caveat is to make sure your magazines work properly. I prefer the factory 10-round mags, although they're a bit hard to find. They don't protrude such that it's awkward to carry the rifle at the balance point. And if ten rounds aren't sufficient, you have way too many problems for one person to deal with. :)

Edward429451
April 2, 2010, 11:10 AM
I love my 10 rnd mag. Some have tried to tell me it was counterfit but it turns out that it is not.

hammie
April 2, 2010, 11:24 AM
A shotgun suffers from two flaws: 1: it's not precise enough, and 2: it's too precise. Many think that a shotgun is an alley cleaner. All you have to do is point it down a hallway and everyone falls over like bowling pins. The problem is that at room distances the shot column is still very narrow, and in order to hit anything you will have to aim the shotgun (just as you would a rifle). However. you can still get pellet flyers, and in a hostage situation, a shotgun is pretty much useless. Plus, you have the recoil issues from 12 gauge buck loads. If you want to use a long arm for home defense then I think a mini-14 would be fine. A marlin 1894, chambered for .357 magnum and with an 18.5 inch barrel would also work if you live in a jurisdiction that is snitty about "assault rifles" and high capacity magazines.

fastforty
April 2, 2010, 10:44 PM
....a shotgun would be better, less chance of massive over penetration.
.....any .223 carbine) loaded with softpoints is going to penetrate less drywall than a shotgun or handgun
Ok, what I meant was "Less chance of killing someone 1.5 miles away if you miss" :)

NooYawkuh
April 3, 2010, 06:55 PM
Ok, what I meant was "Less chance of killing someone 1.5 miles away if you miss"
Solution: DON'T MISS!! :D Besides, if you miss, your problems are pretty much over.

I've thought about keeping a mag filled with frangible rounds for HD, but you never know - You might need to shoot through something hard. Then you're screwed.

One of the last things I'd ever want to do is shoot someone in my own home. But the very last thing I'd ever want to do is go through life wishing I had.

Come and take it.
April 3, 2010, 07:38 PM
penetration is needed in any defense gun.

I would hate to think I was so careful to have ammo that wouldnt go through walls to have a major fail taking on an intruder wearing body armor.

Moloch
April 3, 2010, 07:44 PM
Shotgun. One 00 buckshot pellet weighs more than a .223 and it brings 8 friends to the show! :D

Kmar40
April 3, 2010, 09:07 PM
I would hate to think I was so careful to have ammo that wouldnt go through walls to have a major fail taking on an intruder wearing body armor.
223 is far superior at penetrating kevlar than any pistol or shotgun.

Doc TH
April 3, 2010, 09:11 PM
The short anxwer to your direct question is "yes".

NooYawkuh
April 4, 2010, 11:40 AM
Box of Truth has a lot of info on ammo penetration.
http://www.theboxotruth.com/

I think you should assume that, if you shoot someone, it will not stop there. Also, Mythbusters did a segment on different firearms fired at a car. Everything from 9mm to 12 ga. slugs went clean through all the sheet metal. Except for the engine and the wheels, a car affords no protection whatsoever. I always laughed whenever I saw on TV or a movie where cops get out of their cars and hide behind the open doors. :D Even reinforcement I-beams are penetrated easily.

22-rimfire
April 4, 2010, 12:23 PM
It is a good reliable choice. They are quick pointing little rifles. I prefer a handgun for potential close quarter action, but handguns are harder to develop proficiency with than a rifle.

ostrobothnian
April 5, 2010, 02:38 AM
Are you married? The mini will be fine and she can shoot it too. ARs are boring.

Bartholomew Roberts
April 5, 2010, 07:06 AM
Ok, what I meant was "Less chance of killing someone 1.5 miles away if you miss"

If you miss and you are inside the house, chances are good that the .223 will strike an intermediate barrier and begin fragmenting. Once it fragments, it will not travel far due to the tiny mass of each subprojectile.

If it goes through, say a window, withlout fragmenting, then it will travel further than 00 buck; but either one is capable of making it 100yds relatively easily - meaning you need to be aware of your backstop regardless.

IanS
April 5, 2010, 11:43 AM
Inside the home consider a Rossi .357 Mag Model 92 lever action as well. Not as ear splitting as .223 and most likely you won't be flanked inside your own home esp. if you've barricaded yourself. They can be fired rapidly and accurately though reloading is slow. Top off at every chance like a shotgun. It can also be used at longer ranges outside but at a slower rate of fire compared to a Mini-14.

If you were to step outside your front door the Mini-14 would be more ideal though it can be used indoors. Again, with the right ammo .223 is potentially not as over-penetrative as even a pistol round or buckshot and you won't have errant buckshot to contend with. So the Mini-14 if you can only have 1 rifle.

I'm really down on shotguns these days. The lack of range with buckshot for such a heavy long-gun gives it limited utility. Sure there's slugs but quickly changing ammo when you need it is an issue and I much prefer the quicker follow up of rifles. No doubt a shotgun is un-paralleled at short ranges (15-25 yards max) and indoors you won't get any arguments from me esp. if you've barricaded yourself and have it pointed at the door. But for me shotguns simply lack most times in what all long guns should do. Range.

Steviewonder1
April 5, 2010, 11:50 AM
Yes, have one with a Butler Creek folding stock stuffed with Hollow Points.

beardenbc
April 5, 2010, 12:04 PM
And load her up with the Hornady V-max's.

Rampant_Colt
April 5, 2010, 12:06 PM
As Art Eatman said, be absolutely certain that the rifle properly functions. Aftermarket Mini-14 mags are all rubbish - stick with factory 20 or 30rd mags for best results. My old mini preferred 20rd stainless mags and 55gr bullet weight.

Avoid Hornady V-Max and lightweight VARMINT bullet weights. Do you consider a 200+ pound drunk, drugged-out, tweaked-out man a little varmint?

beardenbc
April 5, 2010, 01:44 PM
I certainly wouldn't want to get hit by it.
The 7.62x39 Vmax is the same weight as standard 7.62x39 (123 grain), will turn his internals into patte, and won't penetrate as much as standard ammo.
Bad for venison, good for defense. Just sayin'.