PDA

View Full Version : Rem 700 trigger job woe


timothy75
March 21, 2010, 01:09 PM
I adjusted the trigger on my cdl to where I'm happy with it crisp-light-no creep, but today at the range while testing it by intentionally slaming the bolt forward on a loaded round it did go off once. I'd hate to start all over on it and wonder if I can just tighten up one of the screws a bit. Thanks

hoghunting
March 21, 2010, 11:45 PM
I don't know how adjustable Remington's new trigger is, but it sounds as if there is too little sear engagement. You need to put just a little creep back in.

birdshot
March 24, 2010, 02:56 PM
i would use a fired round to see if you can get it to trip the sear. your slam fire could have been just that. was there a dent in the primer, like your other rounds?

Unclenick
March 24, 2010, 05:19 PM
I had that happen messing with one of the old-style Savage triggers. Increasing the pull weight a little stopped it.

dahermit
March 24, 2010, 05:30 PM
....but it sounds as if there is too little sear engagement. You need to put just a little creep back in. Some body please explain what the word "creep", means relative to trigger pull.

Harry Bonar
March 24, 2010, 06:04 PM
Sir;
Too little sear engagement!
Harry B.

orionengnr
March 27, 2010, 08:53 AM
http://www.quarterbore.com/library/articles/rem700trigger.html
http://www.snipercountry.com/Articles/RemingtonTriggers.asp

motorep
March 27, 2010, 11:36 AM
+1 on the Sniper Country link. I printed that when it first was posted, and it has done me well.

Buzzard Bait
March 28, 2010, 07:46 PM
When I was a school kid a girl in my class said I was a creep is that what you mean?
BB

Unclenick
March 31, 2010, 12:57 PM
Some body please explain what the word "creep", means relative to trigger pull.

It is small starting and stopping hesitations in the sliding movement of the firing mechanism engagement that is felt through the trigger finger. A good trigger will either break cleanly (crisp, with no movement in the engagement felt before the hammer falls) or it will slide smoothly and evenly and without hesitations (also called a rollover engagement for feeling like a small ball bearing were rolling smoothly between the engagement parts). It should not slip just part way, then hesitate while you to add trigger pressure before it starts moving again. Not even just slightly. That would be an example of creep.

James K
March 31, 2010, 08:08 PM
The Remington 700 has what is sometimes called a "prop up" trigger. It is designed so that the cocking piece, under pressure from the mainspring (firing pin spring) continually tries to push the sear down out of its way. It can't because when the trigger is forward, it props up the sear, keeping it from moving downward. When the trigger is pulled, the support for the sear is removed, and the cocking piece can push the sear down and go forward to fire the gun.

This type of mechanism is a lot more sensitive than the "pull down" trigger of rifles like the Mauser or Model 1903 Springfield, where the trigger pulls the sear down out of the way of the cocking piece, a system resulting in a long, but very safe, pull.

IMHO, messing with the Remington trigger is a bad idea unless you know exactly how the mechanism works and exactly what you are doing. Just jumping in, even with those "how to" directions on web sites, can lead to a dangerous trigger condition and accidental discharge. Worse, if something serious happens, and it is discovered that someone worked on the trigger, that someone could have some problems! (And, it will be the "someone" who is hit with a multi-million dollar lawsuit, not the guys who post on the web sites; they just claim freedom of speech and deny they ever meant for anyone to actually do what they clearly advocate doing.)

Jim

LongRifles, Inc.
March 31, 2010, 11:14 PM
I'll share how I set a single stage Remmy style trigger on a customer rifle:

Adjust until it's nice a crisp.

Rack the bolt like your a 16 year old on a double shot of Viagra.

If it DOES NOT slam fire move onto the next step.

IF it does, increase the level of sear engagement and repeat.

Next step:

Leather mallet in hand begin rapping on the back of the cocking indicator to see if the cocking piece rides over the trigger sear and slam fires.

If it does, go back to step one and increase sear engagement, if it continues then being digging deeper by measuring the amount of cocking piece/trigger sear overlap. (a bit of layout dye or black sharpie marker works well)

Never failed me in once in 12 years.

Good luck.

C

James K
April 1, 2010, 08:22 PM
I won't repeat my last paragraph, just suggest reading it again.

Jim

dahermit
April 2, 2010, 08:04 AM
It is small starting and stopping hesitations in the sliding movement of the firing mechanism engagement that is felt through the trigger finger. A good trigger will either break cleanly (crisp, with no movement in the engagement felt before the hammer falls) or it will slide smoothly and evenly and without hesitations (also called a rollover engagement for feeling like a small ball bearing were rolling smoothly between the engagement parts). It should not slip just part way, then hesitate while you to add trigger pressure before it starts moving again. Not even just slightly. That would be an example of creep. I would ask those who use the word "creep" to describe the amount of travel in a trigger before let off, if the above statement does not describe "creep", what is the word for what it describes?

Wildalaska
April 2, 2010, 12:59 PM
I won't repeat my last paragraph, just suggest reading it again.

Jim

Are you suggesting he take it to a gunsmith?

WildoramireadingyouwrongAlaska TM

Unclenick
April 2, 2010, 01:46 PM
Dahermit,

It describes creep regardless of the engagement length. If you feel the engagement moving unevenly, you have creep. With a crisp trigger you shouldn't feel the engagement move at all before the sudden movement that lets the hammer go. With a rollover trigger you will feel the engagement move, but it will be totally even and smooth and will go right through the hammer drop and won't have any hesitations along the way. Obviously, the first stage of a two-stage trigger doesn't count since the take up of the first stage doesn't move the engagement.

When a person creeps around a location, their movement is starting, stopping to listen or to check for observers, starting again, stopping again, etcetera. It's just not not a smooth motion. Same applies to a trigger. That's where the term comes from.

dahermit
April 2, 2010, 05:35 PM
Dahermit,

It describes creep regardless of the engagement length. If you feel the engagement moving unevenly, you have creep. With a crisp trigger you shouldn't feel the engagement move at all before the sudden movement that lets the hammer go. With a rollover trigger you will feel the engagement move, but it will be totally even and smooth and will go right through the hammer drop and won't have any hesitations along the way. Obviously, the first stage of a two-stage trigger doesn't count since the take up of the first stage doesn't move the engagement.

When a person creeps around a location, their movement is starting, stopping to listen or to check for observers, starting again, stopping again, etcetera. It's just not not a smooth motion. Same applies to a trigger. That's where the term comes from. I agree with you. The purpose of my posts was to get someone to post this definition or creep as opposed to those saying creep was travel. I wanted someone else to take issue with the definition because I all too frequently disagree with questionable common definitions as they pertain to firearms.