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View Full Version : Should I fire these .22LR rounds?


SilentGrunt
February 27, 2010, 02:27 PM
I found some old leftover .22lr rounds. The problem is that the bullets are loose. You can't remove them from the casing, but they can easily be turned clockwise or counter clockwise. I know that, due to their lack a of power, a .22 shell is most likely not going to blow the action of the rifle apart if it ruptures but I just want to be on the safe side.

hogdogs
February 27, 2010, 02:42 PM
Loose bullets is something I find on nearly every single .22rf round I buy... Run 'em...
Brent

Mal H
February 27, 2010, 02:44 PM
Agreed, loose bullets in .22 rimfires are both common and not dangerous.

SilentGrunt
February 27, 2010, 02:51 PM
Thanks guys.

22-rimfire
February 27, 2010, 02:53 PM
Shoot them and never look back as long as they aren't really old, a very odd brand or packaging in which case they may have some collector value. In most cases, there is not much collector value. It is a very specialized hobby.

Old Grump
February 27, 2010, 03:12 PM
Since this time last spring till now my brother and I have been cleaning up and straightening out our work bencehs and we have been shooting all the oddball ammo we have found stashes loose, in bags and in tin cans with and without boxes. Many of those cartridges date back to 73 and some from my other brother back to the late 50's. Some picked up in odd lots of ammunition at auctions are complete mysteries. Many of them were loose as you described but they were dry, some were coated in grease and grime like anything laying around on a work bench 30+ years, some of them the lead bullet was corroded with a white layer of oxide on them. I am happy that the vast majority of them went bang and almost all of them were fairly accurate at the 25 yards I was shooting them at. The worst that can happen is it will go click and nothing happens. Shoot and enjoy.

By the way last fall I thought I had shot the last of them, yup we just found a baggy with another motley collection of about 40 rounds. Some are shot shells or as my Aunt calls them rat shells because she uses them on rats in her basement. Some hyper velocity stuff, some plated, some lead, some HP but most LRN. They will be shot up as soon as the snowbank between my porch and my 25 yard target stand goes away. Haven't checked them but I bet I can wiggle a lot of these bullets too and I bet they all go bang.

Standing Wolf
February 27, 2010, 04:05 PM
By the way last fall I thought I had shot the last of them, yup we just found a baggy with another motley collection of about 40 rounds.

I'm leaving a few of those for my heirs to figure out what to do with.

taudaddy79
February 27, 2010, 10:24 PM
Is this the case for all older ammunition (center fire included)? If it is layin' around, go ahead and give it a go?

JohnKSa
February 27, 2010, 10:28 PM
Is this the case for all older ammunition (center fire included)? If it is layin' around, go ahead and give it a go?Generally the rule is that if the ammunition is visually acceptable (not obviously damaged or corroded) and the bullet isn't loose then it's probably safe to fire. If it has been stored for a long time under non-ideal conditions then you should be aware of the possibility of misfires or squibs.

In .22LR or .22 Short the bullet can be loose (spin) because the design of the bullet doesn't allow it to be easily pulled out or pushed deeper into the case even if it's loose enough to spin.

Loose bullets in centerfire ammunition can cause function issues and could even be dangerous in a semi-automatic under certain circumstances.

taudaddy79
February 27, 2010, 11:00 PM
I'm sure if I did some searching I could've found my answer, so thank you John!

kilimanjaro
February 27, 2010, 11:51 PM
Use 'em up in a bolt action rifle or revolver, don't use a semi-auto.

chris in va
February 28, 2010, 03:01 AM
Have a look at a 22LR bullet sometime. You'll see why they turn in the casing.

carguychris
February 28, 2010, 10:04 AM
Use 'em up in a... revolver, don't use a semi-auto.
I'd add one caveat.

If it's centerfire ammo with a slightly loose bullet, I would recommend single-loading it in a revolver. Otherwise, recoil from a previous round may cause the loose bullet to jump its crimp and potentially tie up the gun.

I would also like to mention a safety reminder that applies whenever firing a round of suspect quality: if it doesn't go bang when you pull the trigger, continue to hold the gun on target and count to ten before ejecting it in case it hangfires.

nutty ned
February 28, 2010, 08:33 PM
No problem, shoot them.

NavyLT
February 28, 2010, 11:08 PM
OMG! I can't believe these people are telling you to shoot those! NO, NO, NO! Send them to me, I will dispose of them properly for you! ;)