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georgiaboy47
February 20, 2010, 08:04 PM
I've looked but I didn't see anything like this, of course I don't have the time to look either, but I wanted to know what ya'll do for training sessions to build upon your shooting skills, not only for practical application, but for competition shooting in things like the IDPA and such. Where do/ did you start from, and how did you progress?

MrBorland
February 20, 2010, 08:36 PM
There are a ton of dry fire drills available on-line. Google is your friend. A few to get you started:

1. Ben Stoeger's 15 minute program:
http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=96029&hl=video

2. Steve Anderson's book:
http://www.brianenos.com/pages/reviews.html#steve

3. Youtube vids, for example:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFhioa1-7FI

4. IDPA classifier:
http://www.idpa.com/classify1.asp

The list could go on. Just start at the beginning of each. I just started competing a few months ago and I won my first match today. I'm a big believer in dry fire drills done consistently.

Doc Intrepid
February 20, 2010, 08:51 PM
Here are a few things that have worked for guys I know.


1. There are some good video presentations out there, by some serious names who have won prestigious matches. The thing about a tool like this is that you can take it at your own speed - going over and over a part of it if you need to. At the very least, videos provide a foundation for you to get to learn the concepts, terms, etc. to get started, and to "see how the pros do it".

2. Believe it or not, many guys dry fire - place a target on the wall or in their garage, and (double-checking that their pistol is un-loaded) practicing their draw strokes, presentation, and - for example, if addressing a plate rack - whatever movement(s) they might use to clear the rack. Just the repetition of drawing, slowly but paying attention to detail, and then dry-firing that initial round (use a Snap-Cap) can be very beneficial.

3. If you have the luxury of being able to use the props (door frames, low windows, etc.) that a Defensive Pistol course of fire might use, practice getting into unorthodox firing positions in the most efficient and effective manner. Many ranges will not allow you to shoot from unorthodox positions: prone, kneeling, crouching behind cover, etc.; if you can, fine - if this is not allowed, again, you can at least practice getting into and out of these firing positions in the privacy of your own home (again, with rigorous attention to safety).

4. Practice in front of a video camera. Nothing provides you with instant and valuable feedback like video footage of you doing something inefficient, unsafe, or un-necessary. Even if you just spend 30 minutes drawing and firing double taps, or addressing multiple targets, etc. viewing the footage afterwards can provide you with input you can use to improve.

5. Work with a mentor. Lots of gun clubs have some pretty serious pistoleros who are competitive shooters. Sometimes they are retired, sometimes not. Occasionally you may be able to ask one of them if you could pay them for a few hours of their time one afternoon, where they take a look at what you're doing and offer pointers. Some of them may offer to help you without pay. Either way, having a more experienced shooter help you along can offer you a way to improve rapidly and/or overcome a plateau when you encounter challenges.

6. Join a league or pistol club that offers regular competition, and compete as often as you can. You will learn something every time you step up to the line, if you pay attention.

So these are some ideas that you might find useful.

Focus, keep meticulous range notes, and pay attention to details - e.g. don't be afraid to go slow at first, and you'll find yourself improving sooner than you'd expect!

Regards,

Doc

MrBorland
February 21, 2010, 02:59 PM
4. Practice in front of a video camera. Nothing provides you with instant and valuable feedback like video footage of you doing something inefficient, unsafe, or un-necessary. Even if you just spend 30 minutes drawing and firing double taps, or addressing multiple targets, etc. viewing the footage afterwards can provide you with input you can use to improve.


You can even post your vid on the Brian Enos forum and get very helpful feedback from great competitive shooters. It's a terrific resource. You'll have park your ego at the door, though. ;)

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showforum=142

WESHOOT2
February 22, 2010, 07:36 AM
Go to your local matches and ask, because folks love to help.