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View Full Version : Guy takes out a Grizzly Bear with a Ruger .454 Casull !!! Amazing Story


shnergen
January 9, 2010, 11:12 PM
Somebody posted this amazing story.

Bear Killed in Self Defense with Ruger .454 Casull Revolver

http://www.takdriver.com/showthread.php?t=723

mtnman
January 30, 2010, 06:23 PM
Wow I hope I am able to live there some day.

crghss
January 30, 2010, 07:12 PM
Man what a story. One lucky man. :eek:

LSU Snapperhead
January 30, 2010, 07:57 PM
WOW , I would have peed my pants like a little girl...

Glad it worked out for him.

riddleofsteel
January 30, 2010, 07:58 PM
I think I would have been safe. Bears won't eat someone covered in runny crap....will they?

JohnKSa
January 30, 2010, 08:03 PM
http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/gallery/survival/animal-attacks/2009/08/charging-grizzly-killed-alaska?cid=082009

"Brush finally fell on his back on the edge of the road. Miraculously, the bear collapsed a mere five feet from his boot soles, leaving claw marks in the road where Brush had—only seconds before—been standing. The bear was moaning, his huge head still moving, as Brush aimed the Ruger to fire a finishing shot. “By then my gun had jammed,” Greg says. “I frantically called my wife on my cell phone and told her to bring a rifle. When she arrived I finished the bear.”"

I wonder what he means when he says "my gun had jammed" given that he was carrying a revolver?

Interesting comment in the closing paragraphs of the article:

"Therefore, they severely restrict hunting for browns to help keep populations viable.

But such protection is coming at a cost to the human residents of the Kenai. While incidents as dramatic as Greg Brush’s are rare, human/bear encounters are not. Indeed, 31 DLP shootings were reported in 2008 alone."

riddleofsteel
January 30, 2010, 08:07 PM
When I had a Redhawk in .454 I had several occasions where bullets jumped the crimp and moved forward enough to jam the cylinder. That was in a 10" revolver with a 4x Leupold scope on top using factory ammo!

JohnKSa
January 30, 2010, 08:11 PM
That's about the only thing that makes sense, isn't it.

I wonder how many people carrying "ultra-magnum" revolvers or ultra-lightweight magnum revolvers have checked their chosen self-defense loads for crimp-jump.

riddleofsteel
January 30, 2010, 08:17 PM
I hear folks spout all the time about "six for sure" and how reliable a revolver is and to a certain extent that is true. However, if your revolver ever really jams you are toast until you can sit down and tear into it.
With a semi auto not many malfunctions short of a kaboom or round stuck in the chamber can not be cleared rapidly with a little training.

B.N.Real
January 30, 2010, 08:21 PM
if this story worked out like he said,having his revolver on him and him being ready to use it at a moments notice without thinking,saved his life.

As others have said,it would be new shorts time for me of this happened to me.

The bear certainly looks like an old one that needed to kill easy game to survive.

He's a very blessed man to be alive.

Nnobby45
January 30, 2010, 08:23 PM
I wonder what he means when he says "my gun had jammed" given that he was carrying a revolver?


It's become rather amusing. If some one's gun doesn't fire for whatever reason---empty, malfunction, forgot to remove safety, the media catch phrase is "gun jammed".

If bullet jump froze up his cylinder, then "jammed" at least, would sorta fit the description of the problem.:cool:

pacerdude
January 30, 2010, 08:43 PM
I'm glad he is okay, that bear was a beast!

Lost Sheep
January 31, 2010, 04:42 PM
The revolver can indeed jam.

Craig Medred (outdoor writer for Anchorage Daily News, now retired) got his Freedom Arms Single Action revolver in .454 Casull jammed up while handgun hunting for Brown Bear. The nose of the bullet of one of the unfired rounds protruded from the front of the cylinder, jamming the gun.

Recoil is trouble, not just to your palm, especially with heavy bullets, heavy loadings and lightweight guns. My advice: Crimp heavy and test your (hunting) rounds with at least two cylinderfulls to ensure the crimp is adequate. (Take one round and subject it recoil 8 to 10 times, measuring its length before and after.)

Craig's account was reported by him in the newspaper (sorry, I don't know the date, it was, like, 20 years ago). Since it was his byline, that counts as first-hand account.

The same thing happened to Greg Brush (the subject of this thread). But since I have not read his own words, I only have it as second-hand.

I have heard reports of revolvers getting bound up (or jammed) by primer setback against the breechface, and the friction binding up the mechanism. If you have soft metal in your primers and heavy loads the primer can "flow" into the firing pin hole, too.

Percussion (black powder, muzzleloading) revolvers often got jammed up when the percussion caps (or pieces thereof) would fall from the nipple (after firing) into the revolver's mechanism, thus creating the possibility of a jam.

I had a Smith & Wesson (K-22 "Masterpiece") that regularly got "jammed" up when the cylinder got warm. But it would give me warning, as the binding was gradual, not sudden.

Lost Sheep

P.S.

When I had a Redhawk in .454 I had several occasions where bullets jumped the crimp and moved forward enough to jam the cylinder. That was in a 10" revolver with a 4x Leupold scope on top using factory ammo!
Do you recall what factory and what loading? Would you share with us?

To3T@g
February 1, 2010, 05:07 AM
I hear folks spout all the time about "six for sure" and how reliable a revolver is and to a certain extent that is true. However, if your revolver ever really jams you are toast until you can sit down and tear into it.
With a semi auto not many malfunctions short of a kaboom or round stuck in the chamber can not be cleared rapidly with a little training.

Yeah,but short of a DE .50,.357or.44 mag its impossible to find a semi auto chambered for a round big enough to stop a chargin grizz! and the big cal DE's are to long and aquard IMHO to make a quick draw from the hip like he was able to do with that short bbl ruger in a Bearacilin chambering! 454 and 500 were made for that very senario i think! I would feel underpowered with my 357 or even my mod 29 .44 when it comes to a big brown like that:eek: WOW!!!!! is alll i have to say about that! Glad he lived to tell the story!

woad_yurt
February 1, 2010, 05:17 AM
Wow I hope I am able to live there some day.

Getting charged by a giant bear while walking the dogs is an attraction?

Rich Miranda
February 1, 2010, 05:58 AM
Recoil is trouble, not just to your palm, especially with heavy bullets,...

Lost Sheep, I thought heavy bullets were less likely to jump crimp, not more. For example, some lightweight revolvers specify at least 120 grain bullets to reduce the possibility of crimp jump.

Also, has anyone heard of any ammo-makers that market ammo on it's ability to hold the bullet in place in lightweight, high-caliber guns?

mtnman
February 1, 2010, 06:07 AM
No it is not an attraction, but if you have never been there you would not understand. You are constantly surounded by nature even in the populated areas. That is the appeal to me, this unfortunate gentleman was close enough to call his wife to bring a rifle. Alaska is trully a great land and one of my goals is to find a job and live there some day. Just in case anyone is wondering I do have a .460 S&W with a 5 inch barrel.

woad_yurt
February 1, 2010, 07:22 AM
I kinda knew what you meant; I lived in Maine for a while so I have some hint. I like conifer smell.

I was making a wisecrack. I guess I should've included a smiley.

darkgael
February 1, 2010, 07:50 AM
Total
Luck shot!

Mr. Brush's words. Lets not forget that. He's, indeed, a very fortunate man. Fortunate that he had the gun, that he wasn't a half second slower realizing the threat, that he was able to clear the gun and that he was able to hit the bear. Even being able to step out of the way is amazing - getting run over by a 900 lb bear moving at 20 mph could kill a person right there.
This story has been on fora for a few months; happened last August.
About AK - the land of wonder. I have friends who live in Anchorage; I visit during the silver season for fishing - usually get some Hailbut to take home at the same time. The first reaction that I had to AK upon getting off the plane - and every trip since - has been "Wow!" It is a marvelous place to be.
Pete

JohnKSa
February 1, 2010, 10:55 PM
I thought heavy bullets were less likely to jump crimp, not more. For example, some lightweight revolvers specify at least 120 grain bullets to reduce the possibility of crimp jump.

Also, has anyone heard of any ammo-makers that market ammo on it's ability to hold the bullet in place in lightweight, high-caliber guns?The greater inertia of a heavy bullet will make it more likely to jump crimp all else being equal. The fact that heavy bullet loadings often recoil more makes the problem worse.

tipoc
February 2, 2010, 12:56 PM
This story is several months old and has been up here before.

tipoc

Double Naught Spy
February 2, 2010, 01:38 PM
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/wildlife/bears/story/897940.html

Yep, it happened back in August, 2009, 6 months ago.

Here is one of the threads for it.
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=383586&highlight=soldotna

It was an old, malnourished bear.

tipoc
February 2, 2010, 03:30 PM
Doesn't mean it's not worth talking about of course. But I do recall the pics. Likely it'll popup 4 or 5 more times this year.

I also recall I added a thread about the 700 pd. black bear out here which has taken a round or two of .44 Mag to the head and walked away.

tipoc

Hook686
February 3, 2010, 12:01 AM
#13
Lost Sheep wote:




The revolver can indeed jam.

Craig Medred (outdoor writer for Anchorage Daily News, now retired) got his Freedom Arms Single Action revolver in .454 Casull jammed up while handgun hunting for Brown Bear. The nose of the bullet of one of the unfired rounds protruded from the front of the cylinder, jamming the gun....


True. The problem I see is that the link 1st post it is stated:
Totally surreal-I
just started shooting in the general
Direction, and praise God that
my second shot (or was it my third?)
Rolled him at 5 feet and he
skidded to a stop 10 feet BEYOND where I was
Shooting from-I actually
sidestepped him and fell over backwards on the
Last shot, and his
momentum carried him to a stop past where I fired my
First shot!


red highlight is mine.

Now I have had my S&W 329PD jam due to 'Crimp jump' with reloads, but never with factory ammo. I also have never had a revolver jam after the last shot was fired. So, 'Crimp jump' really does not explain this.

JohnKSa
February 3, 2010, 01:35 AM
The "last shot" was the "last shot" he fired. It was the last shot he fired because he couldn't fire another shot after the gun jammed. The second article (see the link in my earlier post) clearly says that he tried to fire a finishing shot after the bear went down and couldn't because his gun had jammed. That does assume that Mr. Bush can tell the difference between an empty gun and a jammed gun which seems like a reasonable assumption to me.

I wouldn't argue that crimp jump is probably more common with reloads but it's not impossible for it to happen with factory ammunition. In fact, we had a thread on TFL not too long ago with someone complaining about crimp jump with factory ammunition.

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=381806

tipoc
February 3, 2010, 03:05 AM
The first couple of years that the 500 S&W was out there were quite a number of problems with crimp jump and jammed guns. I seem to remember a recall on either the guns or the ammo and a warning on some specific loads. I'm some fuzzy on the details though.

tipoc

Lost Sheep
February 3, 2010, 03:15 AM
I'm confused.

It goes pretty much by definition that if a gun is jammed, there are no more shots fired after it jammed

I also have never had a revolver jam after the last shot was fired. So, 'Crimp jump' really does not explain this.

The last shot that fires HAS to be before the jam, doesn't it?

Lost (truly lost) Sheep

woad_yurt
February 3, 2010, 07:41 AM
Can't argue with that logic.

mtnman
February 3, 2010, 07:56 AM
Alaska is truely a wonderful place and there are precious few left where someone like me would fit in. Last shot seems to mean last shot fired not the last shot left in the cylinder.