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por356
December 30, 2009, 11:29 AM
Greetings,

This is a CVA kit from way back. The barrel is threaded and screws into the brass frame. Unfortunately, the position that the barrel stops at, does not result in the front site being in alignment with the rear site. Any thoughts on how to achieve barrel bind with the sites aligning would be appreciated?

Many Thanks in Advance,
Wes

Doc Hoy
December 30, 2009, 01:51 PM
Take the barrel out and work it over with some fine steel wool to get any burrs off of it. Go easy. If you hit it too hard you can round off the shoulder of the barrel. This makes the pistol look stupid.

Put it back together tightening to a reasonable tightness. See where the barrel stops. Take it apart and put it back together a couple of times to see if working the threads results in the ability to seat the barrel closer to where it needs to be. You might try some light oil on the threads while you are working them.

I tighten the barrels on Remingtons by carefully clamping the barrel in a vice (Obviously use something between the barrel and the vice to avoid metal to metal contact.)

Be careful not to go past the proper alignment. You can only back the barrel out just a smidgin before it forms a gap between the frame and the shoulder of the barrel. A surprisingly small gap is quite noticable because it is hard to clean properly.

Hold the frame ONLY BY THE AREA THAT IS CLOSEST TO THE BARREL. You can easily twist the frame out of shape if you hold it by the grip end. It simply will not take that twisting force. You don't need any tools to hold the frame, just the vice for the barrel. Now tighten the barrel applying the necessary force to get it to line up.

All this assumes there is nothing wrong with the barrel or the frame. You might want to inspect the very front edge of the frame and the shoulder of the barrel where they meet. Make sure there are no interferences that would stop the barrel prematurely.

I have messed with two of these kits from ASM (1863 Pocket) and numerous 1858s and I never found a barrel that would not tighten up in the proper alignment. They generally get tight when the barrel is about twenty to thirty degrees from proper alignment. It can be a struggle to get them to line up properly but it always works.

Tnx,

Doc Hoy
December 30, 2009, 01:57 PM
Welcome to the forum.....and Happy New Year.

tpelle
December 30, 2009, 02:41 PM
Another way that is used by the FAL builders is to go buy a sanding disk, then cut the center hole in the sanding disk so that it just fits over the threaded portion of the barrel.

Next, slip the sanding disk over the barrel stub so that the abrasive side is against the barrel, then thread the barrel into the frame. Tighten it so that you can just turn the sanding disk by taking hold of it on the edge. Having the sanding disk trapped between the frame and barrel makes sure that you remove material from the barrel evenly.

Spinning the sanding disk will now abrade away a little of the barrel shoulder.

Sand a little, then disassemble without the sanding disk to try it.

Repeat as necessary.

Doc Hoy
December 30, 2009, 03:50 PM
tpelle,

When this is done, you have to be careful not to mess up the barrel-to-cylinder gap. I have never seen a Remington which really needed this process. But I agree with you about the remedy.

Tom2
December 30, 2009, 04:23 PM
Why not remove material from the front of the frame versus trying to remove from the barrel, which seems harder?

Doc Hoy
December 31, 2009, 02:52 AM
But removing material from the front of the frame so that the barrel will turn further could get out of hand. I have never seen a Remington clone in which the barrel would not line up properly and I have never had to use anything more than hand pressure (No tools of any kind on the frame).

If the barrel turns too far, there is a different kettle of fish. Only way I know to work on that is to back the barrel out until it is lined up, and then if there is looseness, use a shim or something on the threads. (Non hardening Lock-tight or some such).

I have never experienced either of these situations so I am breaking new ground.

Hawg Haggen
December 31, 2009, 09:04 AM
Why not remove material from the front of the frame versus trying to remove from the barrel, which seems harder?

Never remove metal from the most expensive part. Always remove it from the cheapest part.

madcratebuilder
January 1, 2010, 07:50 AM
Never remove metal from the most expensive part. Always remove it from the cheapest part.

Excellent advise!

Unfortunately, the position that the barrel stops at, does not result in the front site being in alignment with the rear site.

What position does it become tight at? How far do you need to turn it. Is barrel gap correct?