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JenniPooh
December 4, 2009, 01:22 AM
I bought my husband what I thought was a regular antique replica pistol. It's not. It's a 1851 Cofederate Navy .44 Caliber Revolver replica thats made by F.LLI PIETTA. I had no idea that it doesn't use bullets. The b@$t@rd that sold it to me informed me today they don't make bullets for it when I tried to buy a box. It's a blackpowder muzzle loading pistol, instead of bullets I know have to buy a whole list of stuff that'll probly cost as much as the gun. It just so happens the store will not take returns on firearms that aren't broken. It's hard to believe they didn't screw me over because I'm a woman and don't know crap about guns. I need to know what to get to make the gun perform as good as a regular pistol. That is if my husband can even load it, which I doubt. Somebody please help me make this $200.00(and growing) mistake shoot before Christmas!!!!!

JenniPooh
jamieandjenn@bellsouth.net

Diamond LawDawg
December 4, 2009, 03:13 AM
Hang it on the wall...buy a real gun that shoots bullets

Raider2000
December 4, 2009, 05:59 AM
Welcome to the Forums young lady.
That revolver will make a fine Christmas present for your husband, here is a few things that he'll need to go along with it.

Does he have any cleaning equipment for other firearms?
If he does then he'll need:

Nipple Wrench = http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?products_id=7624

Powder Measure = http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0003249210263a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=powder+measure.&Ntk=Products&sort=all&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3Asort=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

.454 Round Ball = http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat602007-cat603821_TGP&id=0040403212649a&navCount=9&podId=0040403&parentId=cat603821&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IK&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat601233&hasJS=true

Percussion caps = http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0006579210239a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=percussion+caps&Ntk=Products&sort=all&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3Asort=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

Goex FFFG Black Powder = http://www.powderinc.com/catalog/order.htm

Or Pyrodex P. = http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat602007-cat601638&id=0012634210235a&navCount=15&podId=0012634210235&parentId=cat601638&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=QZ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat601233&hasJS=true

Wads to go under the ball = http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat602007-cat603824&id=0054090216538a&navCount=20&podId=0054090&parentId=cat603824&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IK&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat601233&hasJS=true

Or he could just use a little Bore butter over the ball = http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0006158210247a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=bore+butter&Ntk=Product_liberal&sort=all&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3Asort=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

That will get him shooting & the Powder Inc. link is for buying the Black Powder in bulk, many gun shops & some Walmarts will have Pyrodex P so you can get that to shoot in that revolver just fine.

Also you can read this thread here & it'll give you a lot of information.
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=207028

DiscoRacing
December 4, 2009, 06:06 AM
I bet you guys eat this up

wonder if thats good or bad?? I would probably put that one on the wall and get a bullet shooter.

Doc Hoy
December 4, 2009, 06:07 AM
Ought to also have hearing protection and eye protection if he does not already have it.

Raider2000
December 4, 2009, 06:11 AM
OK guys, let's keep it nice in here please, this is a real firearm it just needs a few things to make it function compared to one that just take cartridges tis all.

simonkenton
December 4, 2009, 07:10 AM
Here is the problem with this pistol, Miss Jenni.
As a muzzleloader, the powder that is used is corrosive.
This means, that any time you shoot the pistol you have to clean it.
If you take even one shot, you have to clean it, and this involves taking the gun all apart. Maybe 20 different little pieces to wash in the sink with hot soapy water.
Takes 20 minutes and is a stinking mess.
You take a few shots one day, you are in a hurry, you don't clean the pistol, you stick it in a drawer.
A month later you remember you need to clean the gun, you pull it out of the drawer, it is a hunk of rusty crap! The pistol is ruined 'cause you didn't clean it.

It is "Love it or Leave it" with these old time pistols, loading them is not too bad but cleaning them is a mess.

If you buy a modern revolver, you can shoot a whole box of shells and not clean it, the modern cartridges are not corrosive.

The gun is beautiful, hang it on the wall and buy your husband a nice .22 or .38 revolver.

Since you like the looks of the old time guns, get him the Ruger Single Six. This is a .22 revolver that looks like the old time cowboy guns, rugged, reliable and accurate, shoots regular modern cartridges, any guy would love to have a Ruger Single Six.

mykeal
December 4, 2009, 07:15 AM
As usual, Simon is a little over the top. Yes, it is necessary to clean the gun after shooting it, something one should do with cartridge firearms as well. It is NOT, however, necessary to take it completely apart to do so. A complete teardown and cleaning is certainly recommended on a regular basis, how often depending on how often the gun is used, but certainly NOT every time. Which, by the way, is exactly how one should treat any fine, expensive firearm, black powder or smokeless powder.

simonkenton
December 4, 2009, 07:43 AM
Any time you shoot the cap and ball pistol you have to, at least, take out the cylinder and remove the nipples. That is 10 pieces, counting the wedge, barrel and receiver.
You MUST do at least this much every time you shoot it, even if you only take a few shots.
And this minimal cleaning does take 20 minutes.
Some guys do a complete teardown after every shooting, which does get up to around 20 pieces, and takes even longer.

And any way you slice it, just removing and cleaning the cylinder and nipples and barrel is a stinking mess.

You certainly don't need to clean a modern pistol every time you shoot it. You could shoot a modern pistol a dozen times over the course of a year, and not clean it, and no harm would come to the gun. And when you do clean a modern pistol it is nowhere near the mess of cleaning a muzzleloading pistol.


Mykeal don't let your love of the old-time pistols cloud your description of what a hassle they are to clean, when compared to a modern revolver.

I have given this girl a fair and accurate comparison of the cap and ball vs. the modern pistol.

Mykeal why are you tossing the personal insults my way?

Raider2000
December 4, 2009, 08:04 AM
It doesn't take me that long to clean any of my C&B revolvers when I only remove the barrel assembly, cylinder from the frame & then the nipples.

I use hot soapy water to clean in a 5 gallon bucket then change the water to rinse all, then use WD40 to displace the water from everything & dry patches to get everything dry.

Then I'll use Ballistol in & on everything to lubricate & protect & reassemble.

About once every 6 or so months I'll disassemble my revolvers completely to just check everything but most times I really don't need to because they come out clean & in great condition, & I've been doing that for over 25 years with only a few springs "that through time & use" have been broken.

On a normal basis I'll go through 400 shots minimum in either of my revolvers.

robhof
December 4, 2009, 08:25 AM
You also might check at the store you bought it and see if they have a b/p pistol starter kit; it will have everything, but the powder and caps, just be sure it is for the caliber of the pistol, as the kits are caliber specific. There are many advantages to the b/p guns; cheaper to fire, no registration hassle in most states and it's not even classed as a firearm in some states. Good luck.

Springfield Kid
December 4, 2009, 08:26 AM
I`d say take it back and talk to the manager if you have too ..if they won`t give you your money back you should at least be able to get a store credit for the price .
Your husband might enjoy the store credit also .
If a man hasn`t shown a desire to own a cap & ball revolver he more than likely doesn`t want one .
They are alot of trouble to load and clean and such .

madcratebuilder
December 4, 2009, 08:55 AM
As usual, Simon is a little over the top.

Just a little. Simon, you make it sound like drudgery, cleaning is part of the black powder experience, embrace it, make it your friend.


It doesn't take me that long to clean any of my C&B revolvers when I only remove the barrel assembly, cylinder from the frame & then the nipples.

I use hot soapy water to clean in a 5 gallon bucket then change the water to rinse all, then use WD40 to displace the water from everything & dry patches to get everything dry.

Then I'll use Ballistol in & on everything to lubricate & protect & reassemble.

I use a similar procedure, it's not much more time consuming that a modern smokeless revolver.

You need to know that black powder can be very addictive and this gift may led to other revolvers.

Uncle Buck
December 4, 2009, 09:10 AM
Jenni, reguardless of what the others say, I would like to offer some congratulations to you for at least being interested in your husbands' shooting.

Shooting a cap and ball revolver can be a fun experience and I would hope you really enjoy it. I would see if they have the starter kit, caps, balls and powder. Although I would probably go to another shop if you feel the guys at the original place took advantage of you.

When you go, just take the information about the gun with you and a knowledgeable sales person should be able to help you.

Have fun, shoot straight and never give up.

Microgunner
December 4, 2009, 09:12 AM
Welcome JenniPooh,
Another drawback to cap and ball firearms is they can't be easily unloaded. To unload them you need to fire them until empty or buy a co2 unloader which is messy and unreliable.

arcticap
December 4, 2009, 12:47 PM
Here's the Cabela's starter kit:

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0036660216053a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=starter+kit&Ntk=Products&sort=all&Go.y=4&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&_D%3Asort=+&Nty=1&hasJS=true&Go.x=16&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

But I would wait until your husband receives the gun and decides what he wants to do with it.
I agree with Springfield Kid that the gun shop owner may give your husband store credit to allow him to trade up or to purchase something else. And your husband may just know more about C&B pistols than you realize and he'll be more than happy with your gift selection.
Give it time and somehow everything will work out.
Don't worry, be happy! :)

Ifishsum
December 4, 2009, 01:37 PM
I bet he likes it - C&B revolvers are a blast to shoot IMO. Get one of the inexpensive starter kits and some Pyrodex P and he's on his way. It gets even easier if you use the Pyrodex Pellets made for a revolver but I actually enjoy the loading process.

Springfield Kid
December 4, 2009, 02:08 PM
My Ex wife use to return everything I bought her for Christmas or B days .
Thats why she is now my Ex wife ....:D

kflach
December 4, 2009, 02:16 PM
JenniPooh,

At my wife's suggestion I bought an 1858 Remington replica by Pietta on July 5th this year. I didn't know anything about what a cap & ball revolver is (it's not actually a muzzleloader), anything about maintaining or firing it, and my wife expected I'd hang it on a wall somewhere.

I got online, found this forum and another one where there were knowledgeable people, and learned how to use it. Frankly, I *LOVE* my gun (I even named it after my momma and my wife).

Yes, I had to buy some supplies - every gun needs them.
Yes, I had to learn how to load and maintain it - every gun needs this, too.
Yes, I clean it after I use it (basic cleaning after each use and a good thorough cleaning every now and then) - every gun has to be cleaned, too, though maybe not as often.

Frankly I've enjoyed shooting it more than the more modern pistols that use chambered cartridges. At this point I've shot over 700 rounds through her, and the joy and pleasure of seeing the smoke & flames belch out of "Judy Kay" - as well as the looks of awe I see on the faces of other people at the shooting range - is well worth the time spent loading or cleaning it.

I've found that though it takes me more time to load her, I get to savor the experience of shooting her at the range a lot more than those people who simply show up, shoot BLAM, BLAM, BLAM, BLAM, BLAM, BLAM, as fast as they can and then leave. She's accurate and pretty (I have a brass frame), and contrary to what's been suggested by some, she's a *real* gun.

I've made a ton of new friends. I go out every couple of weeks with a group of "Cowboy Action Shooters" - many who have 1851s. We have a great time shooting!!!

People have their preferences, and I have no idea what your husband will or won't like. I don't blame you at all if you want to fight for the right to return it and get another kind of pistol (there are many great ones out there). However, for my part "Judy Kay" has been one of the best things my wife has ever given me!!

fastforty
December 4, 2009, 03:17 PM
It really depends on what purpose the gun is intended to serve. If it's strictly a hobby thing & he likes to putter around, he may love it. If he wants a nightstand gun for home defense it is a very poor choice. If he might like to take quick, short trips to a firing range often, it's going to be more hassle then he will want to put up with.

tpelle
December 4, 2009, 06:29 PM
JenniPooh, I think ya done good! I find that I'd rather shoot my cap and ball revolvers even more than my "modern" cartridge-firing handguns! With cartridge handguns you just drop the cartridge in (however it's actually loaded) and pull the trigger, then repeat.

The cap and ball revolver gets one involved in the whole process - measuring and dumping the powder, pressing in the ball, putting the percussion cap on the nipple - and when you shoot it, there's a satisfying BOOM, and SMOKE, and FLAMES and SPARKS shooting out the front! It's a real hoot. (And you spend 30-seconds shooting and 10 minutes in the loading process - so you appreciate the shooting more and spend less money on ammo. Plus, you don't feel obligated to pick up the brass!)

Cleaning it isn't as big a deal as other's are making it out to be. A bucket of soapy water - it's just about like washing the dishes. I don't remove the nipples from the cylinder for each cleaning, either, but maybe about every third or fourth cleaning. And for lube, I use Crisco - same stuff you use when you bake cookies! (For "modern" guns you need all of these smelly, caustic, carcinogenic chemicals to clean 'em.)

And, sure, your husband can load it. Heck, I've got a picture of my (then) 12 or 13-year old daughter shooting my 1860 Army revolver, which is similar to the one you bought for your husband except it's .44 caliber where yours is .36. Maybe YOU should get your husband to show YOU how to load and shoot it, after he get's it down. The family that shoots together stays together, as they say.

bluper
December 4, 2009, 06:43 PM
almost the same thing happened to me and my mother when i was a child. I had a black powder 1851 navy and i did some research on them and i had my mind set on a 1860 army. went to a local gunsmith and purchased one. It was a rotted out piece of crap that he reblued and threw in some new inner parts...well it never worked right and the timing was off / paid 150.00 for it. kept taking it back for repairs until one day he advised it wasn't safe. he would not refund our money, but would give us 150.00 credit on any gun he had on the shelf. Well i had some money saved up and we purchased a nice flat black DA .38 colt army / service style revolver for 500.00. yes it was another rebuilt one and the bore looks like a sponge (all holly). I still have it
I remind you that i was a kid with my mother and we new nothing about guns at the time.

the rifleer
December 4, 2009, 10:46 PM
That absolute bare bone basics are powder, caps, balls, and a powder measure. then if he wants more he can get it later on, be those are the absolute essentials to making the gun fire.

All this can be had for less than $100 total. its expensive, but it will keep him in business for a while. call local gun shops and see if they have what you need. check both bass pro and cabellas if you have one near you. ( i ordered black powder supplies from bass pro shop and they didn't charge me the hazz. material fee)

and yes it does shoot bullets, you just have to load it yourself. Tell him to watch videos on youtube. its very simple, the manual will explain it was well. just make sure that no matter what happens, you keep that barrel pointed away from any part of your body.

make sure you put some grease on top of each chamber when you shoot to prevent chain fire.

Just be safe and have fun.

ClemBert
December 4, 2009, 11:15 PM
I bought my husband what I thought was a regular antique replica pistol.

Hmmm, sounds to me like what you bought IS a replica of a regular antique type pistol. So what you thought was correct. However, maybe you thought you were buying a replica of a cap-n-ball revolver converted to a cartridge revolver. The firearm you bought is a real revolver that shoots. Many of us have the same revolver you bought or similar and love it. I love my 1851 Navy. It shoots beautifully.

Keep in mind just as you would buy cartridges ("bullets") for a modern firearm this particular firearm requires the same components as a cartridge shooting firearm. That is: powder, bullet, ignitor. It's just that for this firearm you buy these three items as separate components instead of the three items combined into one convenient package like a cartridge. The expense isn't any greater for these components and in fact you will be saving money by shooting cap-n-ball style instead of cartridge style.

As far as cleanup I find I spend just as much time cleaning my modern firearms as I do my cap-n-ball revolvers. It doesn't "stink" or smell any worse than using solvents that a modern revolver would use. In fact simple soap and water cleanup is less messy than using solvents like the modern revolvers use.

Rather than run out and buy all the supplies for this firearm I would suggest you give your husband the firearm as intended and have him sign up for this forum. He's going to thank your for pointing him this direction before he fires that first shot.

Guess what....you are probably going to get him addicted to blackpowder cap-n-ball shooting and he's going to want every model made. You won't have a problem figuring out what to get him for Christmas from here on out.

ClemBert
December 4, 2009, 11:27 PM
Oh yeah...this is what to expect for the absolute worse case as far as the three components I mentioned:

1. Gunpowder - $25/lb
2. Bullets - $15/100
3. Percussion Caps - $5/100

That 1lb of powder will probably be enough to shoot that revolver over 450 times. That works out to $115/450 rounds or about $0.26 per shot. For a modern firearm you would be hard pressed to find a box of cartridges for a similar cost.

Again, those numbers I gave you are on the extreme high side. I buy those components such that it costs me about $0.16 per shot so shop around for lower prices.

Onward Allusion
December 5, 2009, 12:27 AM
1851 Navy in .44???

If was a .36 cal with a steel frame, I would have suggested a .38 Special conversion cylinder. However, I don't think one exists for a 1851 in .44 to convert to .45 LC.

Your best bet would be to get a BP starter kit.


JenniPooh
I bet you guys eat this up
I bought my husband what I thought was a regular antique replica pistol. It's not. It's a 1851 Cofederate Navy .44 Caliber Revolver replica thats made by F.LLI PIETTA. I had no idea that it doesn't use bullets. The b@$t@rd that sold it to me informed me today they don't make bullets for it when I tried to buy a box. It's a blackpowder muzzle loading pistol, instead of bullets I know have to buy a whole list of stuff that'll probly cost as much as the gun. It just so happens the store will not take returns on firearms that aren't broken. It's hard to believe they didn't screw me over because I'm a woman and don't know crap about guns. I need to know what to get to make the gun perform as good as a regular pistol. That is if my husband can even load it, which I doubt. Somebody please help me make this $200.00(and growing) mistake shoot before Christmas!!!!!

jcowan
December 5, 2009, 01:09 PM
That is a great gift. Go to Cabelas.com and order the small presentation case, it is $30 and get a brass powder flask for 44 caliber, put it all in the presentation case and you will be all set. Let him get caps, powder etc. if he is interested in shooting it. I would love to get that for Christmas. ( I am getting an 1860 Army and the presentation case ) Like your husband, I have a great wife too but she was afraid to pick which one to get so I gave her a little help. Be careful with this I have been shooting for 30 years, bought my first blackpowder pistol last February, now I have 6 of them and enjoy shooting blackpowder much more than cartridge. Blackpowder is a very contagious disease.

Wobble
December 5, 2009, 08:38 PM
My guess is that your husband probably won't like the black powder pistol if you thought he wanted a historic replica cartridge pistol. Therefore, I suggest you take it to a local gun store and ask them to sell it for you on consignment.

Then, assuming you still want a historic replica, go for an 1875 Remington Outlaw .45LC (Long Colt), an 1872 Colt Open Top, a Colt Richards-Mason Conversion, or a classic 1873 Cattleman (a 1873 Colt "sixshooter" replica). Uberti of Italy makes versions of all of these and are sold by dealers such as Dixie Gun Works, Cabelas, Bass Pro Shop, Midway USA and others.

If you buy online, you'll have to find a local gun store to receive your order. There is a modest charge for this service, which, by law, you must use.

4V50 Gary
December 6, 2009, 10:44 AM
What Raider2000 recommended.

Except you don't really need wads. Your husband can use a .32 ACP or .380 ACP cartridge case glued to a stick and used as a dipper to fill the cylinder with farina, cream of wheat, or cornmeal instead of wads. It's cheaper that way.

Rangefinder
December 6, 2009, 11:17 AM
My guess is that your husband probably won't like the black powder pistol if you thought he wanted a historic replica cartridge pistol.

I respectfully disagree. Although a BP pistol is a little more maintenance (longer to load, requires cleaning after shooting without exception, etc), it is very addictive. Maybe it's just me, but the more old-school I get, the more fun I tend to have with it. Keep it. Get the necessary items to get out and fire it, and I'll bet he falls in love with the whole era. If not, you can always consign it later for a 45LC or something. But have him TRY it first. You might be surprised.

noelf2
December 6, 2009, 09:27 PM
I also think you should keep it. He probably didn't want a cartridge replica for self defense anyway. He wanted something fun and nostalgic. The first time he draws that Pietta, he'll fall in love in love with it.

ClemBert
December 7, 2009, 11:07 AM
jcowan: That is a great gift. Go to Cabelas.com and order the small presentation case, it is $30 and get a brass powder flask for 44 caliber, put it all in the presentation case and you will be all set. Let him get caps, powder etc. if he is interested in shooting it.

That is great advice. The presentation case sure will make it look special and a brass powder flash is a nice accent piece to put in there.

After your hubby signs up to this forum and get his questions answered he'll feel confident when he goes out and buys the power, bullets, and percussion caps.

grymster2007
December 7, 2009, 11:49 AM
Our distressed damsel will appreciate all this advice.... if she ever returns!

tpelle
December 7, 2009, 12:37 PM
I'm betting she was looking for commiseration over being taken advantage of by an unethical gunshop owner. She didn't expect all the positive comments about cap and ball revolvers!

Jbar4Ranch
December 8, 2009, 11:01 AM
<--- 18 C&B revolvers - Montana Cowboy Action Shooting Frontiersman category state champion three years running. Fun to shoot, easy to maintain, and more economical to shoot than most cartridge revolvers. I get black powder for about $12/pound in 25 pound lots and cast my own balls. Fer crissake, stay away from Pyrodex, it's corrosive as all hell. My only problem with the '51 Navy in .44 is no such revolver ever existed until modern times.

koolminx
December 8, 2009, 11:22 AM
Hahahaha, you guy's are sponges :D

I wonder if she's ever going to come back... LMAO :) I seriously doubt it...

Springfield Kid
December 8, 2009, 05:14 PM
No kiddin the Lady says she got screwed over by the sales guy because shes a woman and she wanted a cartridge fireing gun for hubby .
Now some are trying to make her life even harder to deal with with tales of what fun he and she will have with this cap & ball gun that will make her run and puke when they enjoy cleaning it . :barf::eek::mad:

Someone even mentioned she should buy a conversion cylinder for it . AND ITS A BRASS FRAME CONFEDERATE NAVY

koolminx
December 10, 2009, 09:34 PM
You guy's don't get it do you?


She is not real and this never happened.... Can you spell Troll? :D That's what I think.

arcticap
December 10, 2009, 09:43 PM
You guy's don't get it do you?


She is not real and this never happened.... Can you spell Troll? :D That's what I think.

Her email address doesn't seem to be made up since it's from an ISP and her name is part of it.
I don't doubt that the other name that's part of it is her husband Jamie.
Maybe after X-mas you'd like to email her husband and ask him how much he liked his present? :rolleyes:

poetgrey
December 12, 2009, 12:56 AM
I have trouble with this one when you mentioned your husband probably wouldn't know how to load it even if it took uh, bullets. Both blackpowder and cartridge guns use bullets. The difference being the latter uses an assembled package as opposed to installing the individual components, powder, ball , and cap. Is there any experience with firearms in the house? If not, it might be wise to do some investigating. Some ranges offer classes, rentals and the internet and forums yet another choice. If my wife got me a blackpowder pistol I would thank her for adding to my collection but I can't imagine her giving me something I know nothing about. So....

Yeah, you can get a conversion cylinder that requires knowledge of assembly/disassembly (not much, so as not to discourage) so the gun will shoot cartridges (uh, bullets) but ONLY STEEL FRAME REVOLVERS or learn the loading process (again, not complicated) and yeah, you're gonna need some stuff after deciding what method to use and if you don't use wads (look it up) then check for grease loss after two or three shots so you don't trigger a chain fire. Simple and not very expensive.....and I'm a sucker for responding as well. I apologize for the people who had to read this.

madcratebuilder
December 12, 2009, 10:11 AM
Maybe this thread should just die.:D

Fingers McGee
December 12, 2009, 11:48 AM
I second the motion

FM

poetgrey
December 12, 2009, 06:57 PM
third....couldn't resist

6kilo
December 12, 2009, 11:25 PM
Just give him the revolver, if he loves you he will love the gun and then he can explore the great fun of shooting it. It will be a fun trip down the learning path to getting it up and shooting. These can be a whole lot of fun to own and shoot. It may not be what you wanted, but it's still a great gift. My wife gave me one years ago and it took me a little while to get all the needed stuff to make it shoot but it was a wonderful gun and a world of fun, still have the gun, just don't shoot it much any more. Keep the gun, find another sporting goods store to shop at from now on. Good luck.

Lost Sheep
January 3, 2010, 06:50 PM
Jennipooh,

Store policy? Contact the owner. Policies are, by definition, flexible, therefore meant to be adjusted when needed, and this appears to be a classic case of that.

Whatever happens, short of a refund and an apology, I would suggest contacting the Better Business Bureau and local Chamber of Commerce and lodging a complaint.

The original post did suggest (reading between the lines) that her spouse hasn't a deep history with firearms, so a Cap and Ball revolver might not be the best choice as a gift.

Sorry I did not see this thread before Christmas. I was looking for another thread when I found this one and am incensed enough that I had to post.

Lastly, and as a last resort, the gun, unfired, new in box is still salable at not too much of a loss.

Lost Sheep

P.S. The CO2 unloader is not the only way to unload the gun without firing it. You can screw a lag bolt into the (soft) lead ball and pull it out. That's how they did it before bottled air.

Black powder is not so corrosive as hydrophilic. Of course, once the water combines with the sulphur, you get sulphuric acid, which does the metal no good at all.

Modern black powder substitutes (pyrodex, et al) are a lot less problematic than the original.

Some people run their (lightly pre-cleaned) gun parts through the dishwasher (not using regular dishwasher soap, however-there is something chemically inadvisable about that). If the dishwasher does not leave them warm enough to air-dry, you can put them in an oven at 250 degrees Fahrenheit for a while. If you have hard water in your area, be sure to rinse in distilled water. You don't want calcium built up on bearing surfaces.

Gatofeo
January 9, 2010, 01:48 PM
Anyone hear again from JennyPooh?

I keep watching the runner at the bottom of CNN for, "Italian pistol maker consults with surgeons on removal of black powder pistol from salesman's lower tract" but haven't seen such a thing.

Wonder what the resolution was?

Fingers McGee
January 9, 2010, 03:15 PM
I'd say Jennipooh was a troll. I sent an email & never received a reply

Rachen
January 14, 2010, 03:31 PM
ClemBurt I was going to say the same thing: Ask her husband to join TFL and THR. It is good to have new members to the community.

I would not call her a troll, though, because she might not have Internet at home and the only internet access is a public library. I myself don't have a home computer, so I know how hard it is to keep regular posts.

On a side note, she said she purchased an 1851 Pietta for him? Beautiful gun, steel frame or brass frame.