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View Full Version : Thanks to the hunter we have wild life


lt dan
October 31, 2009, 08:46 AM
we as hunters often get confronted by people that is anti hunting. i don't know about you guys but my experience about these people is that more often than not they are just misinformed.

i have adopted a policy of calm conversation with these people. i like to expose them to some facts that are kept from the general public. the result of such friendly conversations are rewarding to say the least.

here are some facts you can share when you meet one of the misinformed again.

today there still exist an animal by the name of a bat eared fox in africa because hunters on the hunt for jackal( a declared pest) noticed that the foxes numbers where decreasing. this was many years ago and at that time no African government had the means to cope with this problem. so it was left to the hunting community to help with this problem. thanks to the hunters self imposed responsibility today the bat eared fox is no longer a critically endangered animal. i went jackal hunting the other night and saw 19 foxes. some elderly farmers hasn't seen one fox since childhood. but recently they saw more in one night than in their lifetime. the hunters utilising their own funds knowledge and time, kept the local wardens up to speed with the mo of the remaining fox population.the hunters all so educated other hunters as well as the local population on fox conservation. today the hunters is seen as the bat eared fox's champion.

imho, the sheer existence of the sable antelope is thanks to the hunter willing to part with a lot of money, to be able to hunt the sable. to be more specific: the overseas hunter which in most cases would imply the American hunter. although more than 90% of hunts in s-africa are done by local hunters , the complete opposite is applicable to sable hunts. i will stand by my (this is also the belief amongst nature conservationists) belief that due to the fact that American hunters are willing to cover the costs of sable breeders to hunt a sable trophy, it became a financial option to breed sable. fyi the cost of hunting one sable is about $14 000. if someone wasn't prepared to pay that then someone wasn't going to go through the UGE hassle to breed them. and make no mistake it is a uge capital risk to breed sable due to the uniqueness that is the sable. i think you hunters would agree that the sable bull must be one of the Lords master pieces. i have clients that breed the sable and if you spend time in their presence you learn three things: there is a few more animals to breed with that is tougher to succeed with than the sable ,: they love their job/animals and they love the hunting fraternity.

one more thought: established more than 80 years ago the International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation (CIC) is the leading organisation in its field. at their last meeting in Paris they adopted (unanimously) a resolution, that states:"The CIC promotes, on global scale , sustainable hunting as a tool for conservation while building on valued traditions"

your average Joe can see the logic in this.

in short: there will be no conservation/wildlife without HUNTING as a sustainable utilisation.

THANKS TO THE HUNTER WE HAVE WILD LIFE. or as they say here in africa : " if doesnt pay it doesnt stay"

BIGR
October 31, 2009, 08:53 AM
Hunters support alot of the wlidlife conservation programs that help sustain wildlife. Hunting where allowed also helps control over population. You would think that the antis would realize that there is more suffering through animal starvation and disease.

langenc
October 31, 2009, 09:07 AM
More whitetail deer in the US than when the white man settled the country.
None of the increase can be clained by Friends of Animals or PETA. In fact, the hunters have been eating tasty whitetails by the thousands since.

BIGR
October 31, 2009, 09:25 AM
[QUOTE][More whitetail deer in the US than when the white man settled the country.
None of the increase can be clained by Friends of Animals or PETA. In fact, the hunters have been eating tasty whitetails by the thousands since. /QUOTE]

I agree 100 percent. I can recall the time years ago that to see a whitetail deer around my house was like a UFO sighting. It just did not happen. To find deer to hunt we had to drive miles away and at times on game lands. Even then I would hunt for weeks and not see the first buck. Now days I have deer in the area near my house and it is great to see. I have been told that a big buck has been spotted just across the creek from the house more than once. To harvest a nice buck near my house would be great. My normal hunting location is more than 240 miles from where I live. For years we have had to lease land in a more deer populated area. The buck ratio where we lease land is about 5 bucks per square mile. Where I live it is about 1 buck per 2 square miles, they list it as .5 bucks per square mile so i guess you could say 1 buck per 2 square miles. Also where I live it is buck only until the very last day of the season, which is only 3 weeks. Where I lease land its is either sex deer hunting for 4 months.

PETA and those groups are so radical and self centered that they can't see the benefit from hunting. Animals are going to die either by gun, car, disease, starvation or in some cases old age. The gun option is the most painless way and like I said before we must have population control.
Speaking of cars, people would be surprised to see how many human lives are lost in deer / car collisions a year plus the property damage aspect of it.
Well next week I am going to hit the woods and do my part, that deer tenderloin sure does tatse good.....:)

Art Eatman
October 31, 2009, 10:08 AM
Figure how it would be without Ducks Unlimited, the grand-daddy of restoration/preservation. Now we have the same sort of organizations for quail and elk. The desert bighorn sheep is also benefitting.

Were it not for the hunter's view of the monetary value of elephants, they'd be in short supply in many countries, as well.

No game animal is threatened or is in danger of extinction, just because of the efforts of hunters. A side benefit is the incidental protection of habitat for non-game species.

Anti-hunters worry about the fate of an individual animal. The hunter cares about the health of the entire species.

shortwave
October 31, 2009, 11:20 AM
Nothing`s FREE in this world. No government program, no 'free add' giveaways and surely no wildlife management programs. Somebody down the road pays for these programs. Problem is people don`t dig deep enough to see just who is paying for 'free' programs. Most anit-hunters I`ve ever talked to are animal lovers but don`t ever research who actually does the most to support, financially as well as population control, of the animals they so dearly love to go to the woods and photograph. Without the massive support of hunters/hunting organizations some of these animals just simply wouldn`t be there and many species would be alot less abundant. Also, there`s been some big strides in alot of rural area`s where harvested deer are feeding the needy. This helps out our 'free :rolleyes:' welfare system. Just another fact the anti`s don`t know or stop to consider.