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mp25ds4
October 29, 2009, 07:49 PM
hey guys, this is my ww2 (non guns) collection. All of this stuff was given to me by family and friends. I am curious to know what some of it is worth.
heres what is pictured: M1 Bayonet 10" blade, Nazi belt buckle, a marine pocket knife
(i saw one at a gunshow like it and was told it was SS), a hitler youth knife, my uncles map of the route he would travel across Europe, various nazi armbands, one says something like Deustrom? wulksturm wehrmact, one cloth and one nylon nemezetor armband, various medals possibly WWI?, and an
"I am a Doughboy handbook"

http://i705.photobucket.com/albums/ww53/assaultrecon28/ww2.jpg

http://i705.photobucket.com/albums/ww53/assaultrecon28/ww2-1.jpg

nolmsted
November 2, 2009, 08:16 PM
The best place to look is on eBay. Go to collectibles then world war II then military then German and you will find a lot of your items or comparable things. You should be pleasantly surprised

SigP6Carry
November 2, 2009, 10:09 PM
first off "I am a dough boy handbook?"
second off, am I the only one who gets ridiculously uncomfortable at the sight of swastikas?
third off: don't sell off that collection. It has value, sentimentally, to your family. It's an important piece of history. I'd hold onto it.
fourth off: take a look around for various collectors organizations and Ebay's "what is it worth?" feature.

SIGSHR
November 3, 2009, 02:56 PM
"Nemzetor" is Hungarian-Magyar-for militiaman. (Just looked that up on Google.) The red and white armband with the swastika in the diamond is Hitler Youth. The cover photo on the "I am a Doughboy" handbook clearly shows a soldier in an M-1 helmet. Here's a subject for inquiry-when did "GI" replace "doughboy" in common parlance.
"SS marine pocket knife"? There is such a cachet to "SS" that anything labeled SS is suppose to command a premium.

erwos
November 3, 2009, 03:01 PM
second off, am I the only one who gets ridiculously uncomfortable at the sight of swastikas?
I wouldn't say I get uncomfortable at the sight, but as someone who had a fair bit of his family eradicated by the Nazis, I have serious concerns about the gun community when I see "Nazi-marked!" merchandise go for huge sums...

I agree that eBay is the place to look for values, though - I've seen some stuff that I thought was about worthless go for large sums, and some stuff I've thought was valuable turn out to be worthless. Alas, given my little tirade in the previous paragraph, your stuff might turn out to be worth something. :)

SIGSHR
November 3, 2009, 03:07 PM
Swastikas are part of history, if you don't learn from it, then....
What was it "Roger Debris" said in "The Producers"-"Do you know I never knew the Third Reich meant Nazi Germany?"

impalacustom
November 4, 2009, 04:41 AM
If a swastika scares you that bad, you must almost **** yourself when you see a Hammer and Sickle.

The best thing to do is get a hold of a collector of WW2 items and try to talk to them and show them, ask for an estimation for insurance purposes as this will be the most accurate.

mp25ds4
November 4, 2009, 07:21 AM
i had a typo, i meant that someone told me the belt buckle was SS
also i appreciate all the help

F. Guffey
November 4, 2009, 10:29 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/45th_Infantry_Division_(United_States)

A set of Works by Rudyard Kipling, about 1917, was decorated with a swastika inside and out, his son was killed while fighting in WW1 with the Irish Guards in the Battle of Loos which he wrote about in The Irish Guards in the Great War (1923).

Then there was a very bad day, the swastika was blamed, it should make all aware of the responsibility of perception,

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/notorious_murders/mass/neptune/police_5.html

The article says he refused to move a refrigerator (with all that bulk? Does not add-up), and the request came from a lady, who does not want to display skill and strength for the ladies? No where in the article does it say he was in charge, the person in charge would refuse the request to move the refrigerator if the request was not on the work order*, then the complaint came to the office, when the crew returned to the warehouse Fred was suspended, to make the complaining company happy? Not a word from the complaining company but the decision to suspend 'the illustrated man' instead of the person in charge of the crew, in my opinion, screams as the FACTOR, not the collection.

*send a work order for 'X' amount of work, once the work is done we can get 'X' amount free, after all no extra travel time and the crew is already on the job. This works sometimes, but when the answer is 'no' no must be accepted when asking for something free. If Fred was as bad as they claim he should have been instructed not to answer questions but to refer all inquiries to the 'crew' boss. Did the crew boss say 'NO, I need a work order'.

The crew returns, Oh Yea! we dropped a refigerator down the stairs, lot a damage, rails, stairs, floor, desk and people, lots of people. Answer: Refigerator!!!? You moved a refigerator!!!!? Where on this work order does it say refigerator!!!!? You move a refigerator we want to get paid for moving a refigerator!

F. Guffey

MJ1
November 4, 2009, 11:03 AM
...........................:D..........................

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/00b18c12.jpg

SigP6Carry
November 4, 2009, 07:15 PM
A G41 and a G43? nice. Is that the Tok semi at the bottom?

edit: also, the Hammer and Sickle doesn't make me uncomfortable. But the Swastika does. I don't know why, I guess it's just some kind of John Wayne mentality that I picked up as a kid.

Neruda
November 4, 2009, 07:39 PM
Of the OPs medals, I recognise two.

The one with the "rainbow" coloured ribbon is the Inter-allied Victory medal awarded in 1919 to people who had served in the First World War. I think the name of the recipient and unit is usually inscribed on the rim.

The other with the green and red ribbon, is the French Croix de Guerre, often awarded to foreign allies in both the First and Second World Wars.

ronl
November 4, 2009, 08:38 PM
I am a WW2 collector and have been for years. I'd estimate the value of your collection to be worth $1100-$1200 dollars in total. Do the armbands still have the RZM tags? That adds to the value of them. The Garand bayo is from $75-$125 depending on maker and whether the tip of the scabbard is damaged. As to all the hoopla about the Nazi swastika, I guess they would fall over dead if I pulled out my original Nazi flag. That value I gave is just an estimate, as a true one could only be done after inspecting the actual items themselves. They could be worth more just from markings that cannot be seen in the pics.

mp25ds4
November 4, 2009, 10:02 PM
thank you ronl thats good to know, i was keeping this stuff in the garage, the door to which gets left open alot. i guess il move it to the attic. :D
except the medals. i still cant find what the red cross is though

Winchester_73
November 5, 2009, 01:03 AM
second off, am I the only one who gets ridiculously uncomfortable at the sight of swastikas?

I wouldn't say I get uncomfortable at the sight, but as someone who had a fair bit of his family eradicated by the Nazis, I have serious concerns about the gun community when I see "Nazi-marked!" merchandise go for huge sums...

I just don't understand how an inanimate object can cause someone such negative emotion. I understand what you mean, and that is tragic regarding your family, but isn't this the same philosophy of the PRO gun control people? That because their son was shot with a pistol, that no one should have a pistol or a gun? The gun itself never did anything wrong and the swastika has historical importance on firearms and other objects. Do you realize it was around before the nazis? So how do you feel about its use before the third reich? I really think that this is something that people need to get over, like being afraid of the dark. If people are that bothered by a symbol of a group of people who were DEFEATED and basically got what they deserved (in most ways) then there must be something bigger at play psychologically.

***If someone actually was there or FOUGHT against the nazi regime, I could understand the swastika phobia better but for everyday people, I just don't get it.

I agree that the hammer and sickle is a worse symbol btw. The nazis were neutralized but the hammer and sickle was much more powerful and for longer and was almost just as evil but thats a different story for a different day.

edit: also, the Hammer and Sickle doesn't make me uncomfortable. But the Swastika does. I don't know why, I guess it's just some kind of John Wayne mentality that I picked up as a kid.

Wow, do you know anything about John Wayne? John Wayne, just like Patton, and MacArthur all hated BOTH because BOTH were against what America stood for and BOTH can be a direct threat to this country. Any American who knows history has to dislike (perhaps hate) BOTH idealogies if they like America at all. Geez.....:rolleyes:

OP: Very nice collection, btw.

ROGER4314
November 5, 2009, 01:46 AM
That war messed up my Dad as he came back mentally goofed up and alcoholic. War is never a good thing but we need to learn from it and study the "how" and "why" or we are doomed to repeat it. Those artifacts are history......nothing more.

The Hammer & Sickle? That mighty nation has splintered and the components can hardly pay the light bill. Funny how things work!

Incidentally, that supposedly Nazi symbol was a Native American symbol long before Hitler and his buddies came around.

And finally, I hate to say this because I love this country and honor it above all others but as a nation, we also have episodes of shameful conduct.

In time and eternity, these things seem to even up. Those symbols are history and no longer mean what they once did.

Flash