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hogdogs
October 27, 2009, 07:40 PM
Any one able to explain the biologic differences in cervid bones versus bovine/porcine bones? It is strange that it is common acceptance that deer bone does not impart additional savory tasty flavor but these some folks nearly insist on having the bone in for a steak, ham or roast. Then we utilize pork and beef bone pieces in various recipes but I ain't never heard of adding deer neck bones to a bean soup.
Brent

bswiv
October 27, 2009, 07:50 PM
Don't be askin' hard questions!

hogdogs
October 27, 2009, 07:52 PM
Don't be askin' hard questions!
And I also hope it one of those subjects that make you think and can't get off your mind...:p
Brent

cornbush
October 27, 2009, 07:53 PM
I have omly had a couple steaks with the bone in, they were not the best. I think it has alot to do with the fats that cook out of the marrow, just taste alot stronger than domestic meats?

fisherman66
October 27, 2009, 07:54 PM
If I used them fer culinary devises I wouldn't have anything left to predict the stock market. Heaven ferbid I have to use entrails.

hogdogs
October 27, 2009, 07:56 PM
Lemme clarify... By steak, ham, and roast... I meant of beef and pork only...:o
Brent

cornbush
October 27, 2009, 07:59 PM
The steaks I was talkin about were deer steaks. I think the reson you dont hear about recipes using wild game bones is because of the strong taste out of the marrow. Just an educated guess.

bswiv
October 27, 2009, 08:06 PM
OK......so this does deserve a serious answer.

I too vote for the fat as the culprit.

In the past we've a time or two gone through the trouble to actually cook up the ribs off a deer. Not a whole lot of meat on them but we had the space on the grill and it was going anyway so we cooked them.

Truth is that they were fairly good, even though skimpy. What was odd was that when we took the leftovers to work the next day for luncn, and I must say that we went at them cold, they had to be heated back up to be good. The fat that had seeped out of them, when cold, was not good at all.

Never had that problem with cold hog ribs...........

hogdogs
October 27, 2009, 08:08 PM
Yes I intend to trim most all the fat off too before freezing.
Brent

Rembrandt
October 27, 2009, 08:32 PM
Try a taste test with your dog....

Place bones from beef, pork, deer, and whatever else in front of a dog....may not be a scientific explanation of "why" one is better than another, just have to trust the instincts of a dog in these matters. :) (they know!)

rantingredneck
October 27, 2009, 08:38 PM
I don't know Brent.

I always de-bone my roasts and such when I process my own and when my commercial processor does it he does too.

My wife loves to watch those cooking shows like "Top Chef" and "Hell's Kitchen". A few nights ago there was an episode where one of the chefs prepared a "rack of venison" which looked to be nothing more than deer rib bones with the backstraps still attached. When they were done they looked GOOD. That chef won the competition with that recipe too.

Makes me want to try something like that for the first time. I've done the deer ribs thing before but never leaving the backstrap meat intact attached to the ribs.

fisherman66
October 27, 2009, 08:42 PM
Was it the backstrap or tenderloin that was left attached? I think typical "rack of x" uses the tenderloin. Heck, now I'm not so sure.

zahnzieh
October 28, 2009, 12:20 AM
Whast's really nasty is when the butcher has taken a band-saw and made vertical cuts through the venison hams - you get toughness and the nasty taste from the bones. Then you over-cook it and i guarantee the dogs wont even touch it. BTW tried boiling deer leg bones and giving to the dogs for a treat - wasnt too popular, boy did i get dirty looks!!:D

CajunBass
October 28, 2009, 02:20 AM
My wife and I used to take all the venison ribs we could get at the club (we drew lots for the meat after a kill). Most people didn't want them so we got a lot. She'd cook them in a crock-pot with some Bar-b-que sauce and those things were good let me tell you.

roklok
October 28, 2009, 03:03 AM
I dont know what you all are talking about, deer bones are great. Back home in PA we would save every bone to make soup out of. Makes a nice rich broth. I never noticed any odd flavor from bandsawed steaks with the bone in.

DRice.72
October 28, 2009, 06:21 AM
Very interesting. I hope I have the chance to conduct my own test on deer bones this year! :D

94bluerat
October 28, 2009, 06:25 AM
We have been deboning all of our venison for the last couple years. I have noticed a difference in flavor vs bone in. It also takes up less space in the freezer. Brazed and slow cooked neck roast(pot roast style) was always a family favorite, but we just dont do that as much.
The concerns of CWD may be partly behind that. The virus that causes CWD(mad cow or in humans Crutchfeld-Jacobs disease) is usually founs in and around the brain and spinal cord. I'd prefer to keep away from that.

Boneless venison cut across the grain and done Asian stir fry style has gotten big smiles in this house!

2damnold4this
October 28, 2009, 06:34 AM
Sounds like we should experiment this season.

rantingredneck
October 28, 2009, 08:00 AM
Was it the backstrap or tenderloin that was left attached? I think typical "rack of x" uses the tenderloin. Heck, now I'm not so sure.

I think there's some crossover in what's considered tenderloin and backstrap. I know for a fact that what I saw on that program was the backstrap as it connected an entire rack of ribs. No way was that the inner loin or what I typically refer and hear referred to as the tenderloin.

Whatever it was, it looked GOOD......

.284
October 28, 2009, 08:25 AM
I always, ALWAYS, stew my whole neck roast in a stock pot. I fish out the tender meat and make barbeque sandwiches.........crock pot, liquid smoke(not too much), onions, quality barbeque sauce.....dang, now ya got me hungry.

Anyway, I use the stock to make venison veggie barley soup. I strain the bones and particles out, dump the stock back in the pot with a bit of cheap red wine. Then, I brown about 2 lbs. of venison stew meat that has been dusted in seasoned flour...in the pot that goes for about an hour. Next, the veggies....carrots, 15 minutes later, the onions, celery, and fresh mushrooms. Let that do its thing for another half an hour, Finally, add the barley and ten to fifteen minutes later soup's on.

Blasted man.......now I'm really hungry!!!!

Incidentally, the only strong taste in both of my recipes is the left over cheap red wine

Uncle Buck
October 28, 2009, 08:42 AM
I thought the back-straps in the deer were the tenderloins. Too lazy to pull out the reference books on meat cutting...
I usually give the bones to the dogs. We have extra room in the freezer and store the bones there. The dogs will follow me up to the pump house where the freezers are located and will each get a bone and then disappear for awhile.
A lot of the taste in wild animals depends on what they are eating. This year the farmers around me planted beans, so the meat will be a little more gamy and a little less fat on them.
Years when they plant corn, the deer are heavier, more fat on them and the meat seems to taste better.
Also, when we have a bumper crop of acorns, the meat seems a little more gamy. But it is still good.

fisherman66
October 28, 2009, 06:10 PM
I think there's some crossover in what's considered tenderloin and backstrap. I know for a fact that what I saw on that program was the backstrap as it connected an entire rack of ribs. No way was that the inner loin or what I typically refer and hear referred to as the tenderloin.


I was wrong. The backstrap is correct for rack of x.

Swampghost
October 28, 2009, 11:19 PM
Very good question, Brent. I never really thought about it, just did what everybody else did and boned it out.

Years ago a buddy told me about this: Take the whole hind-quarter, put on oil and a dry rub, slit and put in garlic, cook in a smoker to 140*-160*, about 4 hrs. (I like mine pink, more towards 140). Slice across the grain about 3/8" thick. You'll be walkin' in tall cotton.