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Trapshooterx
October 19, 2009, 09:10 PM
My duty rifle is a Ruger Mini 14 :barf: . I use Federal Gold Medal Match 69gr ammo. I use factory 20 round mags. Almost every round fails to extract. If I work the op handle the extractor grips the fired case and it comes out without issue. It has a forward Ultimak mout with an EOTech on it. Any ideas? It is well taken care of and clean. Thanks

olyinaz
October 19, 2009, 10:08 PM
Disregard

the rifleer
October 19, 2009, 10:22 PM
I would suggest a good cleaning and maybe try different ammo, if that doesn't work send it off to Ruger, they will most likely fix it for free.

I have a Ruger old army that i bought used and non-operational, sent it off and they fixed up like new and didn't charge me one cent, even paid return shipping.

trooper3385
October 20, 2009, 01:49 AM
The mini 14 use to be my duty rifle also until my dept switched over to the M4's. I would guess that it needs to be cleaned real good. The mini's are great as long as there clean, but as soon as they get dirty, forget it. Not exactly sure what it's called, but the nipple part that fits into the gas port was usually the problem when mine would start acting up. It needs to be cleaned with a brush and solvent and then put a light coat of oil on it.

MosinM38
October 20, 2009, 07:15 AM
I had the exact same problem with my Mini-14.

COuldn't figure it out. The gas port,etc. was all clean, it was lubed, 3 types of good ammo and quality magazine.

So I ended up piece by piece swapping parts out with dad's Mini-14.

I swapped out the recoil spring. Works like a dream now (And his does too).

I'd say the recoil spring is too strong. That was my gun's problem. As I don't know if you can get them? You'll probably have to send it to Ruger.

KMO
October 20, 2009, 07:29 AM
If the Mini-14 is not completely cycling, you might check a couple of things:

1. The guide rod has a "tongue" that must be facing upward in the rifle. It will fit just as well when inverted, but this will cause a condition like you describe.

2. Also, some popular buffers are too thick to permit the rifle to cycle properly. See if there is a buffer pad installed (also on the guide rod). Remove it and see if this cures the problem. If so, sand it down so it isn't so thick, and retry it.

Skans
October 20, 2009, 08:01 AM
but the nipple part that fits into the gas port was usually the problem when mine would start acting up.

That would be my guess too. I have an AC556 and put a good number or rounds through it and tend to know where it fowls up. It takes a lot, but the gas port tends to get fowled up with soot and copper (looks green) over time. You need to take it apart, make sure that you thoroughly clean the gas port AND where it inserts into the op rod (bolt carrier). That's usually where the op-rod mysteriously sticks. Obviously, clean the chamber while you are at it.

The only other thing it could be is a weak extractor/extractor spring assuming that it is assembled correctly.

On another note - I usually use 55 grain ammo - I believe that's what's recomended for the Mini-14. I've heard of some using 62 grain ammo, but never 69 grain. What do you think about the 69 grain ammo?


One other thing I thought of - Did you take apart the gas block? If not, then don't do it. If so, there is a tiny gas bushing that can get out of place, or lost. This will screw up the gas system. Also, the gas block screws are usually staked - you don't want to mess with this unless you really know what you are doing.

KMO
October 20, 2009, 08:30 PM
One other thing I thought of - Did you take apart the gas block? If not, then don't do it. If so, there is a tiny gas bushing that can get out of place, or lost. This will screw up the gas system. Also, the gas block screws are usually staked - you don't want to mess with this unless you really know what you are doing.

Really, Skans, it's not that big of a deal to take apart that gas block. Ruger, like other manufacturers, is going to throw out all kinds of warnings to cover their liability, but any guy who has some decent mechanical skills shouldn't be daunted by the process. It's just 4 screws and 4 parts. As long as a guy is careful about seating the bushing in the barrel cavity, and the screws are tightened in an even sequence, keeping the block gaps even, this is not major surgery.

Trapshooterx
October 20, 2009, 09:04 PM
Thanks for all the good ideas. I will try them when I get home this weekend.

OHW
October 20, 2009, 09:13 PM
When you installed the rail, you could have gotten the gas block slightly off line. The op-rod/slide part could be rubbing the underside of the rail due to this. That would slow down the ejection stroke enough to cause this. It has happend to quite a few persons who install the scout rails. Check to see if any contact has been made there.

This thread details the experience.
http://www.perfectunion.com/vb/showthread.php?t=73707

trooper3385
October 21, 2009, 01:07 AM
All I've ever shot through my mini is the 64 gr winchester ranger ammo. We would have to qualify at 100 yds and with the peep sights, I would get 4 to 5 in. 20 shot groups. I've never tried 55 gr so I could be better. Last time we had in-service, I managed to pick of a couple of cases for practice, so I'll be sticking to the ranger ammo for a while. When we switched out to the M4's, I was able to buy my mini. I've been meaning to put a 4 power scope on it for awhile, I've just never got around to buying a scope mount for it. The mini that I have has the permanent peep sight on the top, so I have to go with the mount that mounts on the side. Anyone know of a good brand for the side mount?

blume357
October 21, 2009, 06:09 AM
I'll throw out a small spark of a flame... what kind of duty dude?

I'd never carry a gun that didn't work perfectly. find another rifle at least for temporary duty and send the thing to Ruger.

Skans
October 21, 2009, 08:02 AM
Really, Skans, it's not that big of a deal to take apart that gas block. Ruger, like other manufacturers, is going to throw out all kinds of warnings to cover their liability, but any guy who has some decent mechanical skills shouldn't be daunted by the process. It's just 4 screws and 4 parts. As long as a guy is careful about seating the bushing in the barrel cavity, and the screws are tightened in an even sequence, keeping the block gaps even, this is not major surgery.

From what I understand, you're right. I've never had to take the gas block apart. My main concern was that since I was told that the screws are staked that after dissasembly I'd have to use some kind of lock tight to make sure the screws don't come loose. Getting the gap right shouldn't be a problem, but from what I understand you need to torque it to factory specs. If I had to remove the gas block for some reason, I'm sure I could do it - but it takes a little more thought and prep than a simple breakdown of the rifle. And, you will read accounts of people who didn't know what they were doing losing the gas bushing or not knowing it was even there.

KMO
October 21, 2009, 10:50 AM
And, you will read accounts of people who didn't know what they were doing losing the gas bushing or not knowing it was even there.

Yes, you sure will...like ME a few years back with my first Mini-14! I never heard that gas port bushing hit the floor, and never saw it again after that either. At least it wasn't an expensive lesson...Midway sells the stock size bushings pretty cheap. It wasn't until later that I learned that a reduced size bushing would help performance. I've been in and out of gas blocks many times now on various Mini-14's, and I've never used a torque spec. I would not, however, discourage anyone from torquing the 4 screws, though. I just use a careful rotating sequence so they tighten up evenly. As for staking, I've only known for the factory to do that...

Trapshooterx
October 22, 2009, 10:19 PM
I carry what they give me. I would be violating policy if I put something else in the car. I am a road patrol deputy and a K-9 handler. If I do my part I should only need one shot anyway :D