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Major Dave (retired)
October 6, 2009, 09:26 PM
Going to Colorado, 2nd gun season, Oct 17-24, at 9,000 to 11,000 feet elevation. Current weather this week is lows in teens and 20's, highs in 40's and 50's. Must be prepared for 0's and 20's. Could have sudden temp drop and/or snow to 12 inches or more.

So, I think I need to load my day pack mostly with survival gear (tarp, tent pegs, parachute cord, matches, fire starting materials, etc.) and equipment needed to dress and drag out the carcass.(Knives, bone saw, small hatchet, etc.)

What am I forgetting? This is my first such trip, so I'm a "newbbie", at age 68.

Need advice, please. Thanks. :o

IDAHO83501
October 6, 2009, 09:34 PM
Don't forget a candle

elkman06
October 6, 2009, 09:38 PM
Going to Colorado, 2nd gun season, Oct 17-24, at 9,000 to 11,000 feet elevation
What's necessary?? About 10 more weeks of excercize... Seriously, if you are in good shape you will get by.. If not,,dooooo noooot push it. People in good shape completely underestimate the effects of altitude sickness. I live at 6700 ft, trim for a 50yr old who climbs stairs every day and I still have a nagging headache for about 3 days at 10K.

Beyond that, don't put 30lbs in your pack. By the time you pack your rifle, cold weather clothing, boots, etc you will be hauling about 30lbs of gear. Pack the basic survival gear w/ a good water bladder, survival blanket of some type, knife, saw, matches and lighter, Plenty of solid energy food.
Ditch the tent pegs, etc. If you have to spend the night out, you will do best in your blanket w/ a fire close.
Good luck,
elkman06

plainsman456
October 6, 2009, 10:05 PM
Keep the load light.You should not need the tent,but take water,jerky or something like that and compass,matches and a space blanket.You will need to drink even when you aren't thirsty.And don't forget the map.Good Luck

Gbro
October 6, 2009, 11:00 PM
Extra wool socks!,
How far are you going to range from your vehicle? Are you staying in a camp setting?
My 1st year hunting in Colorado we hunted the 3rd rifle season. Cold wet feet was the biggest headache. I carried a mini expresso maker in my pack.
Water jugs need to be tipped over at night. Canteen had to be in sleeping bag with me so I could make Gorilla milk in morn. Good FRS 2-way radio's w/weather are a must.
Are you in a limited area or State wide?
Any cow tags?
Make sure you understand Co's. No party hunting reg's.

Good luck.
Elkman, Your high altitude cation is excellent. I am amazed with your own sensitivity, I thought that was just for us low-landers to get hit with it. I live @ 800ft.:rolleyes:

FrankenMauser
October 6, 2009, 11:29 PM
Altitude sickness is a real pain. I live at 4,620 ft/asl, and hit the mountains every chance I get. Like Elkman, even I get the headache, and sleeplessness. Even 8,000 ft can do it. The times I hit 9,000+ or camp at 10,000+, it really affects you... just resting. Once there is work to be done, you really get hammered by the lower oxygen level. It's amazing what that tiny percentage of difference in O2 concentration can do.


Other than taking it easy... I can only suggest the following:

2-3 emergency blankets.
1-2 emergency ponchos. (They're corny as hell, but come in handy for many things.)
A minimum of 250 feet of parachute cord. If you have to haul out a quartered Elk, you'll be using 20-30 feet just to secure each quarter to your pack. At the end of the long hike; you'll be greatful to cut it, rather than untying the tight, bloody, crusty knots.

bullspotter
October 6, 2009, 11:31 PM
Depends on how you hunt?? Leaving on foot early in the morn and returning after dark??? Hunting by your self or in a party close to others?? I dont see a flash light on the list might want a small amount of tp also. Might think about a small gps of some sort. Also hope you have a good set of water proof boots, (that you have been wearing to break them in) A pair of gators would be a must if the snow is deep. Look at the small gerber light weight saws, they would aid in work on an animal, as well as cut wood limbs and such if a fire was needed. NEVER EVER under estamate the weather, MT, WY,CO weather can turn real ugly real fast this time of year. Always have your gear and warm clothes with you, even if your just taking a short hike thinking you will only be gone for a few hours. Also a good pack frame may be nice to get an animal out, Im a pretty avid elk hunter and been in areas with a down animal where your not going to just drag it out like a deer, they are pretty big and can be alot more work then you think getting them out.... Might want to have a camera also!!! IS this in grizly country?? May want to think about pepper spray or a side arm. Might want lots of extra cord to hang meat up high of you need to return to get the rest of the animal out the next day, a big bear will make quick work of a downed elk if left overnight. Might want some of the water purification tablets, and a small first aid kit with you, maybee a few extra shells for the rifle. And ofcourse the already listed items, for starting fires, ext.....

HiBC
October 7, 2009, 01:29 AM
Expect a storm.There is some chance you won't get one,but I expect one.

In a surprisingly short time,the ceiling will drop,your GPS won't work,and it will start snowing.Soon.it will be whiteout blizzard,sharp blue lightning followed by immediate thunder all night long,and snow 4 inches above the kneees at morning.At least,that was the weather I got 2 years ago.
But,I did expect it.We are older guys,too.And we had backpacked into the Flattops wilderness,about 9000 ft.

As our resources,like dry clothes ,were in limited supply,we decided it had stopped being an elk hunt,and our mission was to stay warm and dry ,enjoy the trip.Packing an elk out was frankly beyond our capability at that point.

The summer decision to cache some extra stove fuel and a machete for firewood was a good one.

Now,I am assuming you are talking about your day pack,not your camp gear.

Have a map and compass.Your handle indicates you are a vet.Do you recall grid co-ordinates? draw in the 1K lines.Its good to be able to give co-ordinates on the radio.Have a radio.Hydration pack hoses freeze.So do water filtration pump checkvalves..I'm thinkin MIOX,next time.Cascade makes a small fabric bucket.Trying to squat and balance edge of muddy stream is a good way to get wet feet or worse.(this is camp gear)

A walking staff can be a very good thing.

You need something to keep your butt dry.A piece of closed cell sleeping pad in your pack can be good.A gi poncho can be good.

Nitrile gloves for field dressing. Aspirin.

I had some problems with thigh cramps,talk to your Dr.I had vicadin,muscle relaxants with me,but hydration,elecrolytes,potassium,magnesium,etc might be better.

No offense,but sometimes nothing is better than some oxygen in camp.

Daryl
October 7, 2009, 05:44 AM
Someone above said to keep to the basics in order to keep your pack light. That's good advice.

Things I won't leave behind:

Fire starter of some kind, preferably more than one source. A lighter and a magnesium type firestarter are the norm for me. I've had the magnesium starter for years and it still works great.

A candle that can burn for 12 hours or more.

A compass and a map of the area. These can get you into good hunting areas and also save your life by showing you the quickest way out in an emergency. Know how to use 'em.

A good poncho (military type can be used for shelter as well as a garment)

A good knife and a small sharpener.

"Quick-energy" type snacks.

Water.

Bino's.

A few rounds of spare ammo.

A small first aid kit including pain relievers. Mole skin is good to have in it too, in case of blisters.

An extra day's worth of any prescription med's you may be taking. 35mm film canisters are great to keep an extra morning and evening dose in. Mark the lid for which one is which.

A roll of survey tape for marking a blood trail.

Twine or cord.

Paper towels (general purpose paper, and can also be used for marking blood trails if survey tape gets left behind).

ZeroJunk
October 7, 2009, 06:48 AM
I run out of water first it seems like.Takes a lot climbing hard in dry air. I have eaten snow several times trying to stay hydrated and it's not very satisfying.It's not good to have to change your hunt to drop down and find some running water.

roy reali
October 7, 2009, 06:51 AM
Oxygen!

Seriously, here is neat experiment to try.

Eyesight is one of the first senses to be affected by low oxygen. Sometimes you don't realize how much. So grab an 0-2 bottle and find a spot at least 8,000 feet up and one that you can see lights or stars. Look at the light source for a few minutes. Take out the oxygen and take several good, deep whiffs of it. Look at the lights again. You literaly won't believe your eyes.

Edward429451
October 7, 2009, 07:34 AM
I never carried a big day pack for the elk hunts. Carry snacks, a coat in case the weather rolls in bad fast, water, and map/compass/gps unless you have a good sense of direction.

Travel light as possible.

Generally speaking, if you're not used to the altitude, it takes 1 day per 1000 feet of elevation to get acclimated.

Good Luck!!

hogdogs
October 7, 2009, 08:26 AM
An excellent fire starter is to dip strips of corrugated cardboard into molten wax and let cool. pack into a gallon ziplock.
Strips of 8-9 inch 1/4 inch wide is ideal. Pack as many as you want but short of a deluge, only 2 are needed to start the fire if you used good kindling fuel.
Brent

Daryl
October 7, 2009, 09:35 AM
An excellent fire starter is to dip strips of corrugated cardboard into molten wax and let cool. pack into a gallon ziplock.
Strips of 8-9 inch 1/4 inch wide is ideal. Pack as many as you want but short of a deluge, only 2 are needed to start the fire if you used good kindling fuel.
Brent


I've used the cardboard stuck in a "frozen orange juice" canister, and filled with parafin wax for a candle. I'd imagine the strips would work well for starting a fire.

On that subject, one road flare, available at your local auto-parts store, will light a fire anywhere, any time, under any circumstances. It even burns hot enough and long enough to dry out wet wood enough to make it burn.

But if you need that, your hunt has now turned into a survival situation.

Yep, I've carried one at times; used it once.

Daryl

GeauxTide
October 7, 2009, 11:18 AM
One mentioned wool socks. I'd go a step further. I used to duck hunt and fish in the rainy LA marsh, so I invested in a pair of Filson Merino Wool underwear. Best warmth investment I've ever made. For your hunt, I'd acquire some wool pants and a wool coat, which will be lighter and warm while wet. Add a spare wool watch cap to your pack or jacket pocket.

Scorch
October 7, 2009, 12:47 PM
Your day pack has to provide the materials you need to process game as well as survive if needed. What I carry in my day pack:
Dry socks
Dry clothes (a pair of thermals and a windsuit)
Small metal drinking cup (Sierra cup)
Small lightweight mess kit
2 MREs
Soap
Matches/lighter in a waterproof container
Firestarter
Moleskin
First aid kit
Knife/fork/spoon set
Lightweight line (parachute cord)
Tube tent
Knife with 4" blade
Sharpening stone
Trail mix/GORP
Water bottle
Shop rag or towel
Paper towels
and most importantly
TOILET PAPER!! (it can be very useful)

kraigwy
October 7, 2009, 01:28 PM
A big friggin horse

http://photos.imageevent.com/kraigwy/huntinghorses/websize/Pete.JPG

Major Dave (retired)
October 7, 2009, 01:59 PM
Thanks a lot.

To answer some of your questions -
The Field Artillery lives and dies by topo maps, so, yes I use them. As a service school instructor, I taught land navigation (compass/topo map) classes on a quarterly basis for 8 years. Already marked my hunting topos at each 1 K interval. Have plotting aids (GI issue) to measure UTM grid and grid azimuths, conversion of magnetic (compass) azimuths to grid (topo map) azimuths, etc. Squared away on that.

Base camp will be at 9 K, using wall tents with cots and heaters. Will have a cook tent and 2 sleeping tents, 7 hunters. "Guide" will provide/set up tents, bring cooking pots/pans/utensils, and cook whatever food we buy and bring. "Guide" will not go hunting with any of us. Free to hunt individually, or buddy up in groups of 2 or 3, whatever you feel like.

I will probably start hunting within 2 or 3 (1,000 yard) grid squares of base camp, the first few days, before I get too brave and go out further.

I will have 4 days prior to the hunt to acclimate a little:
Leave home (500 ft elev), and travel to 3,500 elevation first night.
Second day travel from 3.5 K to 7.5 K, and spend 3 days there. Leisure time, visit w/BIL, maybe shoot some of his coyotes!
Fifth day travel from 7.5 K to 9 K (base camp).

I have been walking laps (half an hour), climbing stairs (another half hour), and walking either 2 miles or 4 miles around the (hilly) neighborhood, with a 15 lb weight in my day pack for 3 weeks, now.

What else can/should I do?

comn-cents
October 7, 2009, 02:04 PM
I didn't see anyone mention GPS! If you get an ELK it can take you back to that exact spot, not to mention get you out. Have fun and good luck.

plainsman456
October 7, 2009, 02:08 PM
OH,HAVE FUN.Good Luck

taylorce1
October 7, 2009, 04:08 PM
I don't carry much as I don't want to pack in too much. My day pack consists of:

Hydration Bladder
Rain Gear
Survival Blanket
Plastic Painters drop (takes up a lot less room than a small tarp)
MRE
Lighter
Mini Mag Flashlight
LED light that clips on bill of cap
Small First Aid Kit (band aids, antiseptic wipes, mole skin, asprin & crevat)
550 cord 25-50'
Mesh game bags
2 knives
Knife Sharpener
Wyoming Saw
Binoculars
Compass and map plus GPS
Surgical gloves
Baby Wipes
Extra AA batteries
Extra Socks
Water proof bag Small
10 rounds of Ammo

HiBC
October 8, 2009, 02:27 AM
OK,I did think of one more thing.I used this last weekend on a buck antelope and it worked perfectly!!

Carry a few nylon wire ties;zipties.

I tend to get surgical when I field dress.I prefer the contents of the bladder and colon do not contact the meat.The wireties,appropriately placed,work very well to tie off what is necessary.I was able to deliver an intact bladder with no dribbles.A little careful cutting around the prostate and some tissue separation and the colon and penis came up through the pelvis intact.

If you are partial to liver,include a ziplock appropriately sized.Be advised elk carry fluke,cook it.No raw liver rituals.And,whether it is a cardboard disposable or a small.light digital,some form of camera is a good thing.

Remember ,even though it might be cold,the sun can work on you.Lips!!Oh,and your hands might start drying and cracking.There is a tiny tin of Nivea works good,about 1 1/2 in by 3/8 in.

Oh,yeah,I carry a little 3/4 oz or so bottle of betadyne and a Carlisle dressing.

kraiwy has it right about the horse,but it is good to have a wrangler sort around who knows many things about horses.
Just getting a horse and going to where you are going is akin to just getting a raft and running the Grand Canyon.

Rangefinder
October 8, 2009, 03:08 AM
What else can/should I do? Relax! It's a hunt, not a job interview!

Spacific location might help a little, because you might be coming to my neighborhood (Pagosa). How about some specifics on the hunt plan? It all comes into play. I just stepped outside a minute ago and it was raining---cold, but still just rain at 7200 feet and only a light dust of white visible in the high peaks. The snow isn't hitting yet. BUT, it's getting pretty cold at the 9000-foot elevations, so I'd honestly be looking from that altitute to a bit lower--not higher as much unless you find a well-sheltered park. The bulls are pretty stirred up now, so I'd work on calling. They're herding up to move to the winter grazing grounds pretty soon. Bulls are getting stupid, and cows are looking for company.

For gear? Just like any other big-game hunt, but with the provisions in mind that it's gonna be cold. Leave your cotton at home, and invest in wool everything.

wyobohunter
October 8, 2009, 08:24 AM
Beyond that, don't put 30lbs in your pack. By the time you pack your rifle, cold weather clothing, boots, etc you will be hauling about 30lbs of gear. Pack the basic survival gear w/ a good water bladder, survival blanket of some type, knife, saw, matches and lighter, Plenty of solid energy food.
Ditch the tent pegs, etc. If you have to spend the night out, you will do best in your blanket w/ a fire close.
What he said.
A mountaineering friend of mine observed me stuffing a bivvy sack into my summit pack. He informed me that bringing the bivvy sack along would just make me more likely to need it. Take the basics and go light. If you ffind yourself venturing too far from camp you should consider moving camp.

Gbro
October 8, 2009, 08:42 AM
Good for you!
You have a butler, not a guide. You are going "hunting":).
I also use the UTM grid. It is amazing how rusty one gets at working map from season to season.
Hunt the saddles, plan you hunt to work your way to the saddle gradually.
Enjoy, and know that us that didn't plan an Elk hunt this year will be keeping you in our Prayers and thoughts.
And be awaiting your post hunt report.

ZeroJunk
October 8, 2009, 08:53 AM
I don't carry a day pack. I can put what I want to take in my coat. Sandwich, water, Advil, matches, and a sharp knife. I'm bad about forgetting toilet paper and having to cut my underwear off.


It's hard to get lost in the mountains if you pay attention to where you are in relation to the peaks. If you go down you will come to a trail, and if you keep going down you will come to a bigger trail. I suspect many of these go back to the Indians.

Biggest threat is if you crossover in to another drainage and don't notice the transition. Where I hunt that could get you on the other side of the divide.:eek:

The mountains are not a place to hunt alone. i don't mean sitting with your back to each other, but you need to know about where somebody is all the time, for both of you.

Little bull last year.

That orange pack my partner has weighs about 40 pounds. I thought he was moving up here.:)

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn259/ZeroJunk1953/IMG_0343.jpg

wyobohunter
October 8, 2009, 09:50 AM
Leave your cotton at home, and invest in wool everything.

This is very important. Synthetics will also work fine (fleece) for less $ and weight. I have both. Synthetic longs johns, some military wool pants I got at Salvation army and two synthetic layers (not counting the long johns) for my upper body (also from Salvation Army). Consider a thick vest and a light sweater. Top all that off with a warm hat (very important) and you are set for the cold. You'll also need good boots, synthetic/wool blend socks and a wind/rain jacket.

Cotton can kill you... This may sound crazy but it's true. Next to your brain the clothes you have are the #1 most important survival gear you've got.

Waterengineer
October 8, 2009, 09:54 AM
Go light, go quiet.

Carrying too much increases the chance of stuff rattling, making noise, the last thing you want.

ZeroJunk
October 8, 2009, 10:42 AM
Go light, go quiet.

Lot to be said for that. But, if you can keep it quiet there is not much downside to taking a lot of stuff IF you can climb toting it.

stonedog406
October 8, 2009, 12:09 PM
Don't know if you get into the Northern rockies much (if that is where you are going) but it has the capacity of being a lot colder than you might think on a nice fall Oct hunt. I am in Cooke City, MT right now and the highs have been around the freezing temp. But forecast lows for next few days are below zero and this at about 7500 ft elevation...just sayin'. Also, water can be critical if you have to get off your daily course. Let's say you have been out most of the day, and it starts to get overcast and snow very lightly, and you think it would be a good time to head back to camp. It is at this point, you cut some big fresh elk tracks and you KNOW it had to be in the last 15 min. Are you going to go straight back to camp? I know I couldn't! And I haven't. I ran out of water on this trek and I swore I would never let it happen again. I purchased a portable water purifier (about $75) and make sure I have room for it -even a short day packer. (Oh good fire starter even wet: transistor battery and steel wool) Have a great hunt!

Rangefinder
October 8, 2009, 03:11 PM
I just stepped outside a minute ago and it was raining---cold, but still just rain at 7200 feet and only a light dust of white visible in the high peaks.

I take it back. It's raining this afternoon and shifting to sleet off and on. So the snow may very well be hitting pretty hard in higher elevations as soon as tonight.

Major Dave (retired)
October 9, 2009, 09:13 AM
Rangefinder, Specific hunt location is just south of Kremmling, CO. Weather there this week has been lows from 14 to 24, and highs in the 40's and 50's. But we won't hunt until Oct 17 thru 24th.Weather forecast for 16th and 17th is "snow showers". But that is for the city, and we will be about 2K to 3 K above the city - heavier snow, I guess?

Hogdog ( I think), where do you buy wax to melt and dip strips of corrugated cardboard in for fire starters?

What's with the candles (several have suggested them)? The tents at base camp will have lanterns, so the candles are used for what?

No cotton? Not even over a pair of light thermals, with heavy thermals, i.e., as the third and fourth layer? I do have one pair of Army wool "field pants, and a military wool sweater, and a civilian wool sweater with hood. Have wool socks, plus a pair of those "space socks" (white, thin fabric with conspicuous silver threads - works like the silver emergency blankets, I suppose. Put them next to the skin, or layered over wool socks, or don't use them at all?

You guys are really helping my learning curve, here. AND I'll bet others are reading this thread and learning a lot, too. I need to print out this entire thread and save it for future reference

wyobohunter
October 9, 2009, 10:48 AM
Rangefinder, Specific hunt location is just south of Kremmling, CO. Awesome area, when I lived in Wyo I'd hunt the border area (Wyoming side) just north of there.
where do you buy wax to melt and dip strips of corrugated cardboard in for fire starters?
Hobby store, dryer lint works even better than cardboard IMO

What's with the candles (several have suggested them)? The tents at base camp will have lanterns, so the candles are used for what?


If you end up having to bivouac or siwash (unplanned night on the mountain) you can wrap the space blanket (the one you should carry along with the one quality emergency type candle) around you in a sort of seated huddle and light the candle. You'd be surprised at how warm this can keep you for very little weight. I spent a night at over 12,000' (Grand Teton) during a late August blizzard using this trick. It weren't fun but I still gots all my parts;)

No cotton? Not even over a pair of light thermals, with heavy thermals, i.e., as the third and fourth layer?
Nope, and here is why. Cotton soaks up water (and sweat), takes forever to dry and draws lots of heat away from your body. That's why cotton is so good in hot envitonments and you prolly wear it in the summer. Although Poly-Cotton blends (heavy on the poly, light on the cotton) make good long underwear. I'm not sure why the cotton is OK when blended with Polyester, but it is. I wear it while out & about during the winter.
Speaking of sweat, try not to. You should hike "comfortably cool" and save the extra layers for when you stop to glass. It's well worth the little bit of time it takes to adjust your layers as your activity level changes. Also, you lose mose of your body heat through the top of your head. Keep a nice stocking cap handy, it's the first thing you should put on to warm up and the first thing you take off to cool down.

I do have one pair of Army wool "field pants, and a military wool sweater, and a civilian wool sweater with hood. Have wool socks,
Perfect! Wool retains about 80% of its insulating qualities if it gets soaking wet. Fleece (polyester pile) is about the same, it is lighterweight but not as durable as wool.

plus a pair of those "space socks" (white, thin fabric with conspicuous silver threads - works like the silver emergency blankets, I suppose. Put them next to the skin, or layered over wool socks, or don't use them at all? Next to the skin, they wick moisture away and help prevent blisters.
Don't forget a wing breaker.
Have fun, I really miss Elk hunting.

oneounceload
October 9, 2009, 11:44 AM
and equipment needed to dress and drag out the carcass.

By yourself? THAT ain't happening - not on an elk.......As mentioned above - altitude sickness will kill you if not careful - you need to get there a few days before you hunt just to let your lungs get used to it. I lived in CO and NV - average ASL about 5000......going to 8 or 9 will make your lungs feel like they are going to burst,.

You'll need survival gear - flame source, food, water, emergency sleeping bag/tarp/space blanket....rope, spare gun parts - scope, bolt, ammunition, extra socks - (dressing in layers) goretex everything helps.....toilet paper - besides the obvious, helps with starting a fire - GPS, maybe a sat phone or similar if you're hunting alone

If oit hasn't been mentioned - moleskin and a water purifier (looks like a straw), and a firestarter brick with striker, a whet stone to resharpen your knife - (amazing how fast an elk can dull the best knife)

As mentioned, NO cotton - silk or alternative to wick moisture and wool

don't forget GOOD glass, and sight your rifle in AFTER you get to your elevation

good luck

HiBC
October 9, 2009, 11:57 AM
This i't day pack,but it seems input on clothing is useful.The GI wool pants are a great piece.I use the German ones.I fitted the Carhart rivet type suspender buttons to them and added Carhart suspenders.

In a slightly different direction,two forces that will beat you down are wet and wind.An outer shell garment,like a parka with pants or bibs of a breathable Gore-tex like fabric are very good.Most of them are horribly noisy.
Cabelas and Browning and a few other outfits offer a quiet finished hunting breathable shell garments.I like Cabelas rainsuede.It is considered packable.It will stuff in its own pocket.I suggest uninsulated.

For undergarments,study the REI catalogue,and Cabela's REI will educate you .Look at 'Base Layers" Underarmour makes some good stuff.Merino wool sox work for me.

The synthetic underwears can be layered.THen,if needed,a layer of fleece is good.Polartec,etc.It is light,warm,and dries fast.

Then,I like a GI field jacket liner,the thinsulate one,as an aditional layer over the pile.You may want to have a synthetic fill(rather than down) vest with some loft to the fill,but a thin,light shell.

Have with you the knit wool gloves with no fingers,like Belker wore on "Hill Street Blues" Get the ones with the rubber polka dots on the palm.
These aren't enough for real cold but they camo your hands and are often enough.For cold,I use GI Artic mitten shells with the trigger finger over the fingerless gloves.

Those teabag type chemical handwarmers are good sometimes .Ice fishing,I put one in each glove.


If you are using a down bag,here is a tip.They have steamy air in them when you are nice and warm.When you get up,it freezes to ice crystals in the down.So,as soon as you get up,while the bag is warm,have a mesh stuff sack andstuff it to drive the damp air out.,then pull it back out,fluff it a bit,and lay it on your cot.If you get some sun,sun your bag.

Have a great trip!!

Major Dave (retired)
October 9, 2009, 01:41 PM
Only one person mentioned them. Anybody else use them?

I bought a bulk package containing 24 of them. Says they will heat up for up to 10 hours.

Comments, please.

By the way, I really appreciate all of the input. Thanks to all of you.

JD 500
October 9, 2009, 04:07 PM
I think the single best thing you can do, is once you get to the BIL's, drink a lot of water. When at high elevation, you can get dehydrated quickly. It's very low humidity, and your sweat can eveaporate without you knowing you're sweating. Drink lots of water. (And continue while you're here)

Also, as you noticed from the weather forcast, there will be a serious temperature swing between when you leave at O dark thirty, and the middle of the day. dress in layers. Someone already mentioned leaving the cotton at home, good advice.

I'm not sure it will be cold enough for you to want the handwarmers, but they're light, I'd go ahead and throw a couple in your pack.

If you will be hiking to a stand/sit down point, I'd reccomend not overdressing in the morning. The hike will warm you up. The last thing you want is to sweat heavily into all your layers and then sit down in the cold.
Put a couple layers in the pack, and dress up when you arrive at where you're sitting.

You are headed to a great area.

Another great firestarter, is cotton balls with vaseline on them. Nice and light and you can put them in a medicine bottle or small tin, even a ziplock.

Good luck. I'm hunting same season, differrent area.

stonedog406
October 9, 2009, 04:14 PM
By yourself? THAT ain't happening - not on an elk

It depends on where you shoot your elk and how the snowpack is!! Sometimes you can ride the carcass down the mountain (provided you cut the rack off first:rolleyes:)

oneounceload
October 9, 2009, 04:31 PM
It depends on where you shoot your elk and how the snowpack is!! Sometimes you can ride the carcass down the mountain (provided you cut the rack off first

UNLESS you have to drag it UP hill first!...BTDT, ain't fun

OP - don't forget your blaze orange. When I lived in CO years ago, it was mandatory.

I would bring a second pair of boots to the base camp so you can let one pair dry whole you're hunting the next day

wyobohunter
October 9, 2009, 04:40 PM
I would bring a second pair of boots to the base camp so you can let one pair dry whole you're hunting the next day +1, so long as you aren't backpacking into base camp. Putting on cold wet boots every morning:barf:

I'd also bring at least one change of socks per day. What works really well, if you have a super posh base camp and a generator is a Peet boot dryer http://www.peetshoedryer.com/ I have learned to love mine.

JD 500
October 9, 2009, 06:52 PM
QUOTE by oneounceload:

OP - don't forget your blaze orange. When I lived in CO years ago, it was mandatory.


Still is mandatory. Solid Blaze orange (No patterns) Vest and a Solid Blaze orange Hat/Cap.

greensteelforge
October 9, 2009, 07:05 PM
If you need to ask this question (no shame in it), you should hire a competent guide. Novice expeditions into the back country, especially in mountains, can turn lethal in a hurry. You're not going camping, and your military training won't do you a whole lot of good. If you're going alone, stay close to your truck, and consider where that elk is in relation to your truck before you drop him.

comn-cents
October 9, 2009, 07:44 PM
greensteelforge "If you need to ask this question (no shame in it), you should hire a competent guide".

WOW the guys just asking for opinions. That's what we do here.:eek:

wyobohunter
October 9, 2009, 07:53 PM
Everybody starts somewhere. If the OP has common sense he should be fine. No need to hire a guide unless you are after a huge trophy bull and not a meat/thrill of the hunt Elk. Hunting the mountains isn't rocket science and it doesn't need to be made out like it is.

You're not going camping uhh, yes he is, hunting is camping/hiking with a gun. Most of the replies (including mine) would be no different if somebody were asking about camping and hiking in the Rockies. Save for one fact, he needs to have a quality pack frame (with a shelf) and be ready to use it. I'd keep the frame with me while out & about, it really sucks to down an animal and have to hike all the way to camp to get the frame that you could have been using to haul the essential survival gear.

your military training won't do you a whole lot of good. Pretty general statement dont you think? If he said he went to "Advanced Logistical Administrative Scool", yeah, you'd probably be right. I went USMC mountain warfare school and I'd say it would be helpfull in mountain hunting. Funny thing is, his handle just says that he is retired military (likely Artillary). This means he could have served a fair amount of time as a forward observer and has had some pretty good training that would apply. Try not to make assumptions. He is just asking for a little inside advice from people who have hunted similar terrain/weather.

oneounceload
October 9, 2009, 08:51 PM
Hunting the mountains isn't rocket science and it doesn't need to be made out like it is.

If someone has never been in that back country, and at those altitudes, it can damn sure be deadly. When I lived in Rifle there were always reports of out-of-state hunters getting lost, some perishing from exposure due to an unexpected storm, etc.......

I wound up buying the US Armed Forces Survival Guide back then - always took it, even if just 4-wheeling for fun

Keeping an awareness of what is happening around you - weather-wise, terrain, etc. is important

ZeroJunk
October 10, 2009, 12:10 PM
I'd also bring at least one change of socks per day


Yep. Last year in seven days I changed clothes once, underwear twice, and socks every day.

And it was 20 below the first night. Take a very good bed roll.

30-30remchester
October 10, 2009, 07:58 PM
After hearing all the horror stories from the above respondants, about the hazards of 8-9-10,000' elevations Im stupdified. Apparently those altitudes cause sleeplessness, headaches, nausea, impotence, and pre mature tire wear. This is quite a relief to finally know its not actually me but the altitude that is causing all my problems. I live at over 9000' elevation and regularly work at up to 12,000'. All these years my wife and kids thought it was just me being wierd. Having lived and worked here all my 50 + years and being on local rescue teams I can suggest the following. A good spacebag and a mini 6oz wind and waterproof tent, plenty of water and high energy snacks. And most of all one of the new personal distress locator devices. These help rescuer find you in minutes instead of days if hurt or ill.

hogdogs
October 10, 2009, 08:05 PM
30-, For a lowlander like me, 9K elevation is like doing drugs that make me lightheaded and goofy... BTW, The highest elevation is near me... 300 and some odd feet above sea level and I have to climb 250+ feet to the "summit":o
Brent

30-30remchester
October 10, 2009, 10:23 PM
HOTDOGS you ever get to these mountains I will DRIVE you up to the top of some 13,000' mountains while you suck on your oxygen bottle.

SOTJD
October 26, 2009, 06:13 AM
just a quick suggestion...

ziploc bags...put at least your undershirts and underwear in ziploc bags, prior to movement, so if you run into inclement weather, at least your balls'll be dry...i can be either cold, wet, tired, or hungry...but once i'm all four, it's a bad day

Rangefinder
October 26, 2009, 08:08 AM
All right, so it's after the 24th. How about a trip report? Don't leave out the details either! :D