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Moloch
October 3, 2009, 06:04 AM
Hi!

I am planning to get my a Ruger m77, I just wanted to ask if the parts of this rifles are really made from cast steel? Is it strong enough to withstand .308?

I am not too fond of cast steel and I want a rifle which withstands thousands of rounds and decades of use.

Thanks!

Horseman
October 3, 2009, 06:23 AM
This is a topic that is known to evolve into fierce debate that lasts for pages. You will be able to find a LOT of reading using the search function.

Ruger's cast steel IMO makes a very strong gun. The Rockwell hardness of a Ruger receiver is in the 50's. Other conventional steels will give a hardness in the 30's. That's how Ruger is able to get away with the integral mount recess that's sharp as a knife blade. Conventional steel would mush the edge when the rings are tightened. The Ruger 77 is an underrated gun sometimes. They are one of the most true copies of the Mauser 98/Pre 64 M70. The new Hawkeye's are great handling guns. If there's anything you need to worry about with ANY Ruger....it's not strength. If I needed a gun to survive with the Ruger would be the one I pluck from the cabinet.

orsogato
October 3, 2009, 06:34 AM
Definitely strong enough to handle .308. Ditto prior post's comments. It's a different manufacturing process. If you don't want cast, buy a Remington or a Winchester, etc. I'm not a brand loyalist, I've owned all three versions of the big three's bolt gun platforms. I like them all. My Ruger m77 is in 7mm Rem Mag. I've had it for about 12 years or so. No problems at all. Be prepared to pay a lot more for a comparable model 70 these days if you go with one of the other makers.

garryc
October 3, 2009, 07:54 AM
I seem to remember reading somewhere that Alaskan guides preferred Ruger rilfes as dangerous game guns. It said they are built like tanks and just never fail. I remember it was 416 rigby and 458 lott that was preferred.

Dr. Strangelove
October 3, 2009, 08:17 AM
I've owned and been loading for a Ruger 77 in .308 since 1988 or so, with no problems. It's a great gun.

ligonierbill
October 3, 2009, 08:22 AM
When I made an honest living, I was a metallurgist. If you are not fond of cast steel, you will be developing a strong dislike to many of the things you use on a regular basis--automobiles come to mind. Your Ruger will withstand a .308.

fisherman66
October 3, 2009, 09:47 AM
You may vote your dislike with your wallet, but Ruger's cast manufacturing gets special ammo from manufacturers with the label "Ruger Only". Unless you handload, it's doubtful you could destroy any modern made factory rifle in new condition. Ruger makes one of the two strongest factory actions. 1885might be the strongest and the #1 gives it one heck of a run for it's money.

Moloch
October 3, 2009, 01:29 PM
Thanks for the replies.

What really worries me is headspace, I can imagine that the locking lugs will move faster than the ones which are forged. (I am not a metallurgist, just using some common sense!)
I'have seen excessive headspace issues on original pre-war K98k's which use incredible strong forged steel so I expect cast steel to be not so strong.

But Ruger has indeed a quiet good reputation, I have a ruger super redhawk in .454 and no complaints on my side.
The new Hawkeye's are great handling guns.
I have a hawkeye ''compact'' .308 stainless steel in mind, great gun, but a few people suggested me to buy a Howa 1500 instead because its made of forged steel.

Horseman
October 3, 2009, 01:35 PM
What really worries me is headspace, I can imagine that the locking lugs will move faster than the ones which are forged.

I would think the opposite being 20pts higher on the Rockwell hardness scale. Some of those great Mausers and even my pre 64 M70 you'll find some dents in the receivers. You won't find a Ruger receiver with dents. Nor can you drill and tap them easily. My 10 year old 77mk II doesn't even have the bluing worn off the raceways of the receiver it's so hard. That gun has around 2,000 rounds fired so it hasn't been a closet queen either.

Moloch
October 3, 2009, 01:44 PM
That sounds really good to me, maybe I should give it a try. I am looking for a rifle which can take the hardest beating and works under the worst imagineable conditions. Of course longevity is a very important factor too, thats why I am asking about its material strength.

By the way, does Ruger offer ss scope mount rings for 30mm scopes too?

rugerfreak
October 3, 2009, 01:57 PM
I got rid of a Browning A-bolt once I shot my Ruger Hawkeye---mine is a sub-moa shooter-------there is nothing more rugged and reliable than the Ruger.

Yes --they make 30mm rings----just remember the front isn't as tall as the back. Buy them from Midway a la carte.

http://www.midwayusa.com/browse/BrowseProducts.aspx?pageNum=1&tabId=10&categoryId=20229&categoryString=657***8705***11686***

j.chappell
October 3, 2009, 01:58 PM
I have a hawkeye ''compact'' .308 stainless steel in mind, great gun, but a few people suggested me to buy a Howa 1500 instead because its made of forged steel.

Why?

I do have and have had many Rugers over the years, 223 REM, 22-250 REM, 243 WIN, 7x57mm Mauser, 7mm REM MAG, 308 WIN, 30-06 SPRG, and 338 WIN MAG.

I have never had a single issue with any and most were some of my more accurate rifles. I have carried a 77 into the woods and afield more than any other make of rifle. They are accurate, durable, and downright reliable.

I would never hesitate to buy a Ruger product. They only way I would buy a Howa over a Ruger would be if I had to have a rifle for a particular hunt and didn’t have the money for the Ruger. Howa makes a great rifle but they are very heavy, bulky, and come in less than desirable stocks.

J.

garryc
October 3, 2009, 02:10 PM
I'have seen excessive headspace issues on original pre-war K98k's

I've seen maybe 4 mausers with that condition. All came out to be late war production or slave guns.

Old Grump
October 3, 2009, 02:38 PM
2 Ruger M77's in the house, 7MM Rem Magnum and 30-06 and plan on shooting the 30-06 today or tomorrow if the rain holds off. I know a guy with a .350 Remington Magnum M77R which he doesn't shoot much because a little scar on his forehead made him gun shy and I know they make them in 375 H&H, .458 Lott, and .416 Rigby cartridges so I would have to say you have no problems shooting a 308. The only thing I dislike about the M77 is the trigger, other than that it's a great gun.

Moloch
October 3, 2009, 03:04 PM
I've seen maybe 4 mausers with that condition. All came out to be late war production or slave guns.
As far as I know the steel quality of all war equipment degraded a LOT at the end of the war, mainly because the steel main source was norway until the seaway was cut by the allies. Even the tanks werent that safe anymore. :eek:

garryc
October 3, 2009, 03:49 PM
As far as I know the steel quality of all war equipment degraded a LOT at the end of the war, mainly because the steel main source was norway until the seaway was cut by the allies. Even the tanks werent that safe anymore.

Hey, you give a rifle to a young kid or old man and he wades into a hoard of Russians, that rifle doesn't need to last that long.

Moloch
October 4, 2009, 06:20 AM
Any further comments?

garryc
October 4, 2009, 06:41 AM
Any further comments?


Yes, buy that M77, you will not be sorry.

dahermit
October 4, 2009, 06:42 AM
I have studied metallurgy in college and have followed Ruger's development of investment cast process since they started making guns in 1956.

Ruger uses mostly 4140 and 4130 chrome-moly steels. Which are known for their strength. Ruger not only produces some of the strongest firearms in the world but, also is a leader in producing investment cast items such as titanium parts for prosthetic limbs (Ossur Co.). Ruger is the leader in investment casting and continues to refine their process.

People who say that the investment cast process produces a product that has less strength than either forging or turning from bar stock do not know of what they speak. Not only does Ruger produce a strong product, but investment casting can produce more intricate shapes ie., the backward slanting recoil lug, and the integral scope mounts.

With any modern firearm, you can expect the barrel throat to erode effecting accuracy long before there are likely to be any strength issues with the action. A person can expect that any modern action from the major makers will last through several re-barrel jobs.

Moloch
October 4, 2009, 08:10 AM
I feel convinced. :D

30-30remchester
October 4, 2009, 07:25 PM
I am not a fan of cast steel and dont own a Ruger 77 any longer, I am also a student of firearm design. That being said while I wouldnt buy one you cant go wrong with a Ruger 77. Thet are very stout and well built rifles in spite of being cast.

Oilburner350
October 4, 2009, 08:54 PM
The only down side to the Ruger is they weight. They are depandabe and a good value.

Crankylove
October 4, 2009, 10:23 PM
I prefer Ruger rifles to almost all others. We have several in the family now, from .22 Hornet up to .458 Winchester Mag, and all of they have have had zero issues. The cast parts have never worried me, put in a little research on it and you will see Ruger knows what they are doing.