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View Full Version : Okay, so I want to get involved in competition shooting...


Skyyr
September 15, 2009, 09:15 PM
Hello! =)

First off, I'm from Tennessee, Murfreesboro to be exact. I've always considered myself a decent marksman - whether or not that's true, I'd like to find out. After getting my Noveske recently, I have a rifle that can shoot better than I can. I'd like to get involved into competition shooting to have goals to compete against and to simply have fun.

I have no idea where to start whatsoever, what rules are involved, etc. That being said, can anyone point me in the right direction?

zoomie
September 15, 2009, 09:21 PM
Here's a start.

http://www.nra.org/nralocal.aspx
http://www.uspsa.org/
http://www.nrahq.org/compete/
http://www.3gunmatch.com/matches.htm

Skyyr
September 15, 2009, 09:41 PM
Thanks for the links. However, this is where I get lost (I did look through them).

I'm probably THE most technical person you can find and I'm the last person to ask for help before I'd read a manual and the fine print 10x, but I'm not sure what I'm looking for, exactly. There seems to be 20 different competition types, all with different rules and qualifications.

I'm simply looking for a breakdown of the different competitions (in layman's terms) and to be pointed in the direction where someone who's new to marksmanship as a sport might want to start. For example, I'm assuming 3-gun might not be the best place to start, as it requires proficiency in multiple areas, whereas I've not even been to a single competition for single-gun events, let alone been in one. In addition, I've only done simple target shooting, no silhouettes, timed-shooting, etc, so even knowing if I could be competitive in those areas/competitions is foreign to me.

I hope I'm making sense.

zoomie
September 15, 2009, 09:48 PM
Tell ya what - explain what you're interested in, and we'll point you in the right direction.

I'll assume you want a rifle competition because you mentioned Noveske. Do you think you'd enjoy run-and-gun combat simulations? Do you want to shoot little groups in paper at 300 yards? Do you want to shoot steel waaaaay out there at 900+ yards? Do you want to get dressed up and call your buddies "Sixgun Steve" and "Stagecoach Stacy?"

Go on youtube and type in things like 3 gun, practical rifle, sniper competition, steel safari, cowboy action, bullseye, high power, and the like. Watch and see what looks good to you.

Skyyr
September 15, 2009, 10:10 PM
I think I'd be most interested in both short/medium range target shooting and something similar to timed rifle precision. Maybe such a thing doesn't exist, but something similar to "hit 10 targets in 20 seconds," while weighing in on the accuracy. I'm not opposed to benchrest type shooting, but I like the idea of weighted precision combined with speed. I'd prefer to stay mainly in the rifle realm (as opposed to handgun/shotgun) if at all possible.

zoomie
September 15, 2009, 10:11 PM
Sounds like this is your thing then.

http://www.nrahq.org/compete/highpower.asp

Also look into Silhouette shooting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfeBfHbzTI4

Skyyr
September 16, 2009, 03:20 AM
Alright, so I've spent the last several hours reading info, rules, and regs on High Power Rifle competitions.

I have a few questions: It appears that Service Rifle competitions have pre-specified configurations that must be used, whereas Match Rifle competitions are an anything goes event. Is this correct?

Secondly, aside from the rifles used, are there any differences in the competitions themselves as far as skill goes? Meaning, are they simply different versions of the same event? Or is Match Rifle a "dumbed-down" version of the Service Rifle competition for beginners?

Jim Watson
September 16, 2009, 07:03 AM
I am not a big time rifle competitor, but hang out with one so to get you started:

I have a few questions: It appears that Service Rifle competitions have pre-specified configurations that must be used, whereas Match Rifle competitions are an anything goes event. Is this correct?

The Service Rifle must look like a USGI M14 or M16 although the ones used in serious target shooting are extensively accurized internally.
The Match Rifle can be a lot different. I had to look up what a Noveske is and it looks to me like it would pass as a Match Rifle. Sights matter, there are iron sight only matches and "any-any" events, that is any rifle, any sight, where you may use a scope.

Secondly, aside from the rifles used, are there any differences in the competitions themselves as far as skill goes? Meaning, are they simply different versions of the same event? Or is Match Rifle a "dumbed-down" version of the Service Rifle competition for beginners?

The courses of fire are the same. The Match Rifle is not dumbed down, the Match Rifle is normally highly refined and higher scores are to be expected.



I don't know what is available around Murfreesboro, I have shot F-class at Arnold Air Force base in Tullahoma and at the Memphis club, and know they do rifle shooting in Chattanooga.
http://www.memphisrifle.com/
http://www.chattanoogarifleclub.org/
http://www.usrifleteams.com/forums/
http://forums.delphiforums.com/tnhighpower/start

Also Oak Ridge
http://orsa.nxs.net/index.htm

lmccrock
September 16, 2009, 09:48 AM
The M1 Rifle (Garand) is also a service rifle. Bolt action rifles are always match rifles, so the 1903 and 03a3 and 1917, although issued by the US, are "match" rifles.

Your Noveske is probably a match rifle, so you compete against space guns and bolt rifles and the occasional old milsurp. If you like highpower, then look at upgrades most competitive for the division (although, that is probably a new rifle).

Lee

Skyyr
September 16, 2009, 10:02 AM
My rifle is a flattop. Here's a link to what it looks like:
http://noveskerifleworks.com/cgi-bin/imcart/bigpic.cgi?i=r-16-556_1d.jpg

What category, if any, would that fall under, and what restrictions would be placed on it?

I was planning on purchasing my next rifle relatively soon, and I was planning on it being either a Springfield Armory M1 or M1A, but I can always get a Service Rifle 20" AR instead if need-be.

Scorch
September 16, 2009, 12:51 PM
You won't be shooting Service Rifle Match with that, it would be a Match Rifle.

There are several different types of rifle matches, the most common of which are Service Rifle, Target/Match Rifle, NRA High Power, Smallbore, and Silhouette shooting. They are all very different.

In response to your original question, find your local shooting club and get in touch with the person that runs the CMP, Service Rifle, or High Power Rifle matches. That person will have lots of information for you, the most valuable of which is the date for the next match. Go, pay your entry fee (typically $10 or so), meet some people, learn a bit about shooting match, and learn the ropes. There is more to match shooting than just shooting, it is like any sport in that it requires training, discipline, and a willingness to learn. I hope you will find it to be both educational and entertaining.

Ken O
September 16, 2009, 09:00 PM
If you are looking at NRA XTC (cross the course) matches the above have commented on, it is shot at 200 yards standing and rapid sitting, 300 yards rapid prone, and 600 yard slow prone.

Both the Service and Match Rifle are shot with iron sights only.

There are High Power prone only matches that are shot at 600 though 1000 yards and are typically three matches of 20 rounds. Two are shot with irons, and one is shot with any sights. There are also prone matches that are shot any/any (any rifle/any sights), which means exactly what it says, all rifle types with any sights are thown together.

The prone matches the shooter uses a the sling for support. Same for the XTC matches except for standing where no sling is allowed to be used, but must be atached to the rifle if shooing in the service rifle catagory.

For prone matches there is now a class that allows you to put a scope on and use a rifle rest, its called F-Class, and it is shot right with all the prone matches in NRA Mid-Range (600 yards) and Long range (1000 yards).

This all sounds harder than it is. Best if you have someone in the area to help you get started. Most are more than willing to help a newcomer.

Casimer
September 16, 2009, 09:04 PM
+1 on Scorch's advice. Check-out what's available in your area, and the local CMP is probably the best place to start. Their matches tend to be very friendly to new competitors, they have a well developed program, and you'll have an opportunity to meet other competitive shooters in your region.

4EVERM-14
September 17, 2009, 02:50 PM
There are alot of small clubs that shoot XTC Highpower but don't have the 200/300 and 600 yards distances. They use targets that are reduced to simulate those distances. These matches are a good place to learn position and technique with only a small concern for the wind. The short courses are not any easier then the full distance but allow the shooter a real challenge at 100 or 200yards.