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7jinxed7
September 9, 2009, 09:05 PM
Not sure what it is.No readable names just a couple of numbers you can half way read. http://i1016.photobucket.com/albums/af285/7jinxed7/DSC01576.jpg http://i1016.photobucket.com/albums/af285/7jinxed7/DSC01578.jpg http://i1016.photobucket.com/albums/af285/7jinxed7/DSC01579.jpg http://i1016.photobucket.com/albums/af285/7jinxed7/DSC01575.jpg

the rifleer
September 9, 2009, 09:14 PM
Looks to me like a swiss bayonet. not sure what model, but it looks like it would fit my k31...

7jinxed7
September 9, 2009, 09:20 PM
Huh. It's rough whatever it is. It's pretty long too,it could be used as sword instead of a knife.I haven't measured but it's easily over 12" probably getting closer to 18" or so.

7jinxed7
September 9, 2009, 09:22 PM
Here's another photo.http://i1016.photobucket.com/albums/af285/7jinxed7/DSC01580.jpg

2amencw
September 9, 2009, 10:24 PM
I believe it is an early mauser model. not sure for which rifle. An uncle of mine brought one back from WW1 that he grabbed off of a dead German. Do a search for Mauser bayonets of WW1 and something is bound to pop up.

Buzzcook
September 10, 2009, 12:46 AM
This could be one of several bayonets, pre-WWII

Maybe a British 1907 but I'm not sure.

At any rate get some bass wool or fine steel wool and machine oil to clean the rust off. Don't sharpen it.

armsmaster270
September 10, 2009, 12:51 AM
The slot looks like it would even fit a garand Might be for a Springfield bolt action.

Homer2
September 10, 2009, 07:28 AM
100% certain that is a British Model 1907 Enfield Bayo for the No1 MkIII. Poor condition, $15-20. Hard to read the date, the '31' would indicate some sort of rework in 1931. Generally they are dated with the month and year, (9 17) and have the maker name on the other side.

http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/brit_bayo.html

7jinxed7
September 10, 2009, 11:31 AM
Thanks for the info Homer2.You are absolutely right.I found some matching photos. http://arms2armor.com/Bayonets/brit1907.htm

BillCA
September 10, 2009, 01:18 PM
Enfield was my guess based on the latch mechanism. The U.S. used a somewhat different latching system. That bayonet is probably between 18-20 inches long.

The bayonet was likely made before 1925. After WW-II most of the Generals were convinced that long bayonets were outdated, unwieldly in forest or jungle applications (especially when attached to long field rifles) and hard for soliders to carry. Around 1928 many military units went to shorter 8"-10" bayonets.¹

Long bayonets like these are hard to come by and often collectable if they are clean and in good shape. Do not sharpen and carefully remove the rust from the blade. Kroil® might help loosen much of the rust.


¹ IIRC, a study by the Brits around 1921/22 found that a soldier's typical thrust range was about 10-12". Longer bayonets risked full penetration on a charging enemy and it could be difficult to remove from an opponent falling down. 8 inches would penetrate great coats and uniform with enough length for a fatal wound but also allow a solider to withdraw it easily.

7jinxed7
September 10, 2009, 05:05 PM
I looked at this bayonet closer. It's 17"blade and 213/4" long. If you look real close just to the right of the 5 31 their is a very faint 6927 with a faint 7 directly under the 6.Does anybody know if that is a serial number?I'm going to see if I can get some of the rust off maybe their will be a few more readable markings.

BillCA,you mentioned using Kroil to remove the rust.I'm not familiar with that.Can I buy it a my local hardware store?Or is this a gun store product?

mp25ds4
September 10, 2009, 06:51 PM
no. 1 mkIII enfield bayonet, 35-40$

bamacisa
September 12, 2009, 11:20 AM
It is a Lee Enfield No1 Mk3 bayonet.

Chris_B
September 12, 2009, 12:20 PM
I hereby name that bayonet "Howard" :D

James K
September 12, 2009, 09:02 PM
It is a British Pattern 1907 bayonet, but it has been rebuilt, maybe more than once. The scale screws are reversed; the slot heads should be on the right.

It may have been made in England, or about anywhere else where the rifles were made (India, Pakistan, Australia) and could have seen use about anywhere in the British Empire. As the old saying goes, "if it could talk", but without speech it is not worth much in dollar terms.

(Edited to change "M1907" to "Pattern 1907". I do know better, but it was late at night.)

Jim