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bababooey32
August 26, 2009, 04:10 PM
How do you all practice with your HD shotgun? My HD shotgun is my only shotgun - I am not a hunter, so I have no other reason to ever fire a shotgun. I haven't asked, but I'm not really sure where at my local range I could effectively practice in the 7 - 25 yd area. Will they let me do it on the pistol range? An 18inch bbl seems inadequate for clays/skeet/trap, though at least it would give me a chance to pull the trigger some.

Just looking to see what others do. Please don't make me feel worse by telling me about your private range on your acreage! ;):rolleyes:

inSight-NEO
August 26, 2009, 06:11 PM
First off, even though Im not much a skeet shooter, I have considered just buying the necessary equipment in order to get in a bit of "following" practice whenever I get the chance. While I do not have any land myself, I have several friends who I regularly shoot with who have access to such land. This would be ideal for the skeet setup.

However, to answer your question more specifically, I currently shoot at either paper targets or "plinkers." But, again, this is mainly done while on my friends land. I dont do much shooting at the range (with a shotgun) anymore. Now, paper targets and plinkers are static and certainly not as much fun as shooting skeet, but when set up at varying distances, they can be useful...particularly if such practice includes moving + shooting "drills."

Now, if you can only fire at the local range (for now), this is still good enough in order to become familiar with the weapon and its patterning characteristics. When I went to my local range, using either the rifle bay or handgun bay (depending on the status), I was able to accomplish the beforementioned goals. For me, this was a good start. After that, I started making some calls in order to find a more "realistic" shooting environment. To expand on this, you could also spend a bit of time working on loading/unloading drills at home while using high quality dummy ammo. Of course, you could also add "mounting" or "shouldering" practice to the list. After a while, you can try doing some of these "drills" in the dark...concentrating on safety and the accurate use of speed/readiness. Of course, it should go without saying, make absolutely sure your gun contains no live ammo when practicing at home.

One more thing: consider "training as you fight." For example, if you tend to only keep 4 or 5 rounds in the tube for HD use, load no more than this while at the range. Also, while at the range, practice such things as loading/unloading, safety engagement/disengagement, trigger control, etc. (all within the safety mandates of your local range, of course); all of these mimicking what you would do during an HD encounter. This kind of stuff helps develop certain habits...hopefully good/safe ones. After all, if you should ever encounter a violent HD situation, Im thinking that you would "automatically" resort to techniques/habits most used in the past.

Whether shooting at paper, skeet, plinkers, whatever...practice, practice and practice some more. Just keep in mind, there is more to HD than merely firing a weapon! ;)

zippy13
August 26, 2009, 11:52 PM
I'm a lifelong Skeet shooter. Hundreds of thousand of practice and tournament rounds have done nothing to prepare me for what to do when something goes bump in the night beyond making me very familiar with my gun of choice. But, my gun of choice for Skeet is a far cry from your typical HD gun.

There's no reason you can't shoot Skeet with an 18-inch barrel beyond a prohibition by your local club. Usually they say excess noise from a short barrel is the reason. Although a 18-inch pump is not the ideal gun for Skeet, it's better than no gun. We have a few members who break-out their HD guns from time-to-time and shoot some respectable Skeet scores. Try a different club, or ask to shoot alone (or with sympathetic buddies) on one of their remote fields during a slow time.

Shooting range short-barrel prohibitions have been discussed at length in previous threads.

Mossy500
August 27, 2009, 12:05 AM
I have a pistol grip mossberg with a 18.75" barrel, ive never been to a actual range so i couldnt tell you anything about that stuff, but my buddies and i usually go out to some old power line service roads or unknown wheelin spots. we just bring a bag of cans and bottles and have someone wing em' we try and get as many shots as possible out on the cans before they hit the ground. thats helped my reflexes and i know where my guns gonna shoot every time, even without a "proper" stock.

Dave McC
August 27, 2009, 07:32 AM
Shoot some clays.

If you can hit a 4" disc moving fast on an unknown vector or better yet a true pair of them, larger, slower,closer targets will be much easier,even under adrenaline boost.

And there's nothing like clays with its high round counts to make you KNOW your shotgun the way your tongue knows your teeth.

And it's fun.

My HD shotguns are 870s. My hunting guns are 870s and until I got the Beretta O/U I used them for clay slaying also.

Commonality of controls, similar triggers and feel, etc.

HTH....

Evyl Robot
August 27, 2009, 10:49 AM
Remember to practice your breach-loads! It takes muscle memory to get those things smooth, fast, and reliable - which demands practice. My house-gun holds seven in the mag, but I keep it ready with only five. Even if I had the opportunity to chamber one and top off the mag before a goblin encounter, those eight will be gone in no time flat. I don't want to be caught for long with an empty gun in the middle of a firefight!

I've shot a lot of paper. I've shot the torso targets at the range, and been to a defensive shotgun class twice where we did some high-volume shooting at multiple targets. I won't tell you about the acreage, but I've shot at multiple targets on my own as well. Last weekend, my brother and I went out with our wives and shot clays for the first time, and that is FUN! Our pump guns range between 18 and 20.5-inches in barrel length, and it was interesting to see how a vent rib helps with fast, accurate target acquisition on a moving target(s).

I've been through countless shells of bird shot. I've shot different sizes of buck in 2-3/4 and 3-in varieties, and done slug plinking at different distances. When you know the machine, it's amazing how tight you can plant rifled slugs at distance! Once, I shot at a phone book after dark to see how the tritium bead I installed works for night targeting, and to see how muzzle flash affected my night vision. Sight acquisition was still quick and accurate, and the flash amounted to no more than an orange halo at the muzzle from the mounted position. It was very interesting.

I only wish I could CCW my 12-gauge!

Old Grump
August 27, 2009, 11:27 AM
Fartlek: Speed play in Swedish. Used it in training when I was in highschool for long distance running. We would jog along while the man in back had to sprint to the front of the line then holler HO! and the next guy would come up. or jog between telephone poles, sprint the next one walk the next one do the next one backwards and on and on. It broke up the monotony.

When I was doing competitive pistol shooting I ended my practices by bouncing a hunk of 2x4 or ammo box or a golf ball with one of my pistols trying to get it into a specific spot like inside a cardboard box or over the berm. Helped with my handgun hunting and made the 1 1/2 hours every night not so painful a chore.

Now I do the same with my shotguns with water or ice filled liter bottles. on the ground, suspended from cord and on top of posts at varying distances. No 2 practices are the same and except for the post height all shots vary in angle traverse and elevation. It helps that I have 12 acres to do this in but I do it with every shotgun I have not just my designated HD gun so it doesn't matter what I have to use. It's a fun exercise but it has a serious application. Surprising how hard a balloon on a string dangling from a tree on a windy day can be to hit. At least for me, I'm not a skeet or trap shooter.

Russ5924
August 27, 2009, 05:52 PM
I don't think most pistol ranges will allow a shotgun. I know where I shoot You would be asked to leave very quickly. Please try to find someone to help you learn to shoot the gun safely and accurately:)

oneounceload
August 27, 2009, 05:58 PM
those eight will be gone in no time flat. I don't want to be caught for long with an empty gun in the middle of a firefight!


And if this a reality for you, maybe you need to move......this sounds just a tad much...if you can't defend yourself with that many rounds rounds from a shotgun, something else would appear to be wrong......or folks are playing way too many video games.......

Mossy500
August 27, 2009, 06:09 PM
Quote:
those eight will be gone in no time flat. I don't want to be caught for long with an empty gun in the middle of a firefight!
And if this a reality for you, maybe you need to move......this sounds just a tad much...if you can't defend yourself with that many rounds rounds from a shotgun, something else would appear to be wrong......or folks are playing way too many video games.......

there could be 9 robbers, he would defiantly be screwed.. lol :p

inSight-NEO
August 27, 2009, 06:43 PM
those eight will be gone in no time flat. I don't want to be caught for long with an empty gun in the middle of a firefight!

If eight rounds out of a SG isnt enough to deal with the matter at hand, then something is wrong. ;) As has been mentioned before, using the noodle upstairs (brain) would hopefully help in avoiding such a dire situation.

Outside of that, I would strongly consider using a "New York reload."

Evyl Robot
August 27, 2009, 07:26 PM
And if this a reality for you, maybe you need to move......this sounds just a tad much...if you can't defend yourself with that many rounds rounds from a shotgun, something else would appear to be wrong......or folks are playing way too many video games.......

If eight rounds out of a SG isnt enough to deal with the matter at hand, then something is wrong. As has been mentioned before, using the noodle upstairs (brain) would hopefully help in avoiding such a dire situation.

Alright, fair enough. Ideally, I want to live my entire life, firing exactly zero rounds at an attacker. I'm not much of a video game fan either, and I like my guns to wear wood furniture and to be devoid of extra gizmos, so don't even try to spin me as some kind of mall-ninja. But, we live in a fallen world. It is unlikely that I will ever fire on one person, much less many. However, have you ever heard of a little country called South Africa? Gangs will invade farm houses and rape, pillage, and murder. Do a couple Google image searches, and you'll have nightmares. The fact of the matter is that where I currently live is stable and safe, but our fallen world is not static. Nobody ever expects the Spanish Inquisition, Hurricane Katrina, or bombs from North Korea. Maybe you guys would like to gamble a little looser on such things, but I have fun honing the valuable skills. And, I am using my noodle to learn these skills. Why then should you criticize me for it?

inSight-NEO
August 27, 2009, 07:53 PM
However, have you ever heard of a little country called South Africa? Gangs will invade farm houses and rape, pillage, and murder.

Yes...violence of the utmost is certainly rampant there. However, Id wager you are far more likely to encounter such atrocities (on a semi-regular to regular basis) living in South Africa than Oklahoma. ;)

Why then should you criticize me for it?

I personally did not mean to criticize you and I apologize if my comments came off as a bit harsh. My comments were actually meant to be more broad in scope.

Frankly, I say do what you want and feel is necessary. After all, its your life you may be defending one day, not mine. Carry on brother...:)

Evyl Robot
August 27, 2009, 09:32 PM
I personally did not mean to criticize you and I apologize if my comments came off as a bit harsh. My comments were actually meant to be more broad in scope.

Frankly, I say do what you want and feel is necessary. After all, its your life you may be defending one day, not mine. Carry on brother...

More than reasonable, and more than fair. Maybe I was a little on the sensitive side. I really hope that I never have to use what I've trained and practiced for, but I'm having a lot of fun in the process, and I'd hate to be caught without.

bababooey32
August 28, 2009, 08:32 AM
If eight rounds out of a SG isnt enough to deal with the matter at hand, then something is wrong.

Incorrect. Something is wrong the second you feel you need a firearm in your hands. At that point, why limit your ability to respond by some preconceived notion about how these encounters "should" go down? Carrying a full mag or a couple extra rounds takes exactly zero effort but, if needed, may save your life.

The chances of ever needing to use your HD shotgun are already infinitesimally small. Trying to predict how many BGs will be there when it happens is silly. Erring on the low side is even more silly.

Thanks for the info guys...I think I need to make friends with someone that has a lease, or talk to the range where I shoot about their thoughts on the matter.

Scattergun Bob
August 28, 2009, 09:25 AM
This is one of the questions on the forum that I try to respond to each time asked. My thoughts on training for personal defense with a fighting scattergun are here buried in the archives.

In my opinion, practicing with a fighting scattergun has more to do with how well we wrap our bodies around the gun, than how well the gun shoots! Another-words, how well do we understand the effectiveness of our scattergun, how efficiently do we operate the working parts of our scattergun, how well do we "manage recoil", how quickly can we sweep onto the next threat becomes the important focus of consistent training.

With absolute certainty, patterning at appropriate HD distances is critical to understanding the effective use of our fighting scatterguns, shooting enough rounds to accomplish this is important. Understanding the recoil cycle of our particular flavor of fighting scatterguns is very important, shoot enough rounds to accomplish this. However, I have found that most of the hard work necessary to truly become accomplished at defensive shotgun shooting is with dummy rounds and the sweat equity of Dry Fire exercises. No amount of money or "cool" add on stuff will make up for the lack of correct operation of your Fighting Scattergun.

I have had a long relationship with Fighting Scatterguns, since 1967. Still today two or three times a month I drag out the 870 and action proving rounds and "sweat" through the same drills that have kept me alive for this long.

I would love to give you all the do's and don't, not enough time or space. Instead i direct you to two titans in the field.

The Defensive Shotgun by Louis Awerbuck ISBN 0-07947-412-2

and

StressFire II by Massad F. Ayoob ISBN 0-936279-11-7

I know both these gentlemen and their books will do much better than I at giving you the skills.

As far as the above discussions on muti-threat incidents, The World Is a Target Rich Enviroment, we still have to fight it ONE shot at a time, learn well how how to do that.

Good Luck in your endeavor, and Be Safe.

greyson97
August 28, 2009, 09:55 AM
bababooey32

HEY! I LIVE IN AUSTIN TOO!

in austin, there are 3 ranges, 2 Red's indoor ranges and eagle peak.
At the reds, you can bring your shotgun and shoot at paper at whatever yardage you want with whatever load you want.

I like eagle peak better though. Between their rifle range and shotgun range, they have a small mound of dirt where you can shoot slugs from about 10 feet. all you need to do is toss out some clay pigeons on the mound of dirt and shoot them

but i have an 18" benelli m4. with the proper choke, you can shoot clay at 20-40 yards

Old Grump
August 28, 2009, 10:53 AM
there could be 9 robbers, he would defiantly be screwed.. lol

I thought about that for a minute then decided he would be alright. If there were 9 boogermen and he took 8 down the defiant last man would most likely be groveling in the dirt, reaching for the sky or running at a high rate of speed back to his hovel with tears in his eyes and momma feebly whispered between gasps of breath.

Practice and attitude make all the difference in the world, more so than what weapon they are using.

bababooey32
August 28, 2009, 01:22 PM
Greyson,

Red's south is slugs only...And frankly I find shooting in there to be creepy. i shoot at Eagle Peak regularly with my pistols...never ventured over by the mound you are talking about. I'll have to ask them next time I am there...Thanks!

rc
August 28, 2009, 08:02 PM
A home defense shotgun is perfectly fine on the skeet range. I have used an 18" 20 guage and it's actually easier than with a longer barreled tighter choked gun. It's the most practical because it will teach you about loading and handling safety and shotgun principles like lead and follow through. Any idiot can point a shotgun and pull the trigger. It doesn't take practice to hit a stationary target with a shotgun. It is not practical practice to shoot at a human target that is 7 yards away. It's a complete waste of ammo. Pick up some 7.5 or 8 shot at Wally world. 1oz blue box ammo is cheapest and will work fine on the skeet range. You don't need heavy 1 1/8 oz field/trap loads and you certainly would not fire buckshot on a skeet range as it is dangerous to a much greater distance beyond which the range is designed to protect the public. You can also do some trap shooting with a 12 guage cylinder bore but don't expect to hit much as ranges are much longer and it gets harder to hit with thin patterns. If you have a friend with some country property get a hand trap or spring loaded trap that attached to the reciever hitch of a truck. Works great and you can see how fast you can load and shoot and reload and shoot your shotgun. Chances are after your first magazine full you won't be able to keep up with the person throwing targets. You should be able to shoot and reload with your eyes closed by touch. Then you'll know your shotgun skills are good enough for a defense situation likely to happen after dark.

oneounceload
August 28, 2009, 09:28 PM
The main issue with 18" barrels on the skeet field, RC, is the stopping of the swing due to the short barrels. Most folks whip those things and then stop - resulting in a miss. Most folks think they need an 18" barrel for HD. If your idea is trying to "sweep" your house, then so be it. Most folks would do better to hunker down in their bedroom while calling 911 and protecting that room from invasion. For THAT purpose, ANY barrel length positioned over the bed you're barricaded behind will work.....

Mossy500
August 29, 2009, 12:24 AM
i have a friend who went to prison for 10 years because he waited in his bedroom for the robber to come and killed him. he was mainly found guilty of murder because he was there waiting with out making his presence known and trying to scare off the intruder. the man had what my friend thought was a pistol (ended up being fake) and he took the shot, and spent 10 years because he didnt say get the F*** out of my house. "hunker down and wait".. not in western Washington

it may be different now, but im not taking the chance

mike72712
August 29, 2009, 07:27 AM
I'd move...

olddrum1
August 29, 2009, 08:29 AM
Why did you not buy a shotgun that you could actually use with a 26 or 28 inch barrel? Unless your locked in a closet, that 18 inch barrel has no advantage. At least a 26 to 28 inch barrel can be taken to a local range with out drawing alot of akward stares.

Willie Lowman
August 29, 2009, 09:01 AM
To heck with 'em if they want to give you weird stares!

My friends and I like to shoot trap with our cylinder bore defensive shotguns because it teaches you to get on the target FAST. A valuable skill when shooting because you have to.

And the looks you get at a sporting clays range when you show up with a M590 is priceless.:p The feeling of accomplishment is greater when you break clays with one of those guns than a Superposed.:D

greyson97
August 29, 2009, 10:00 AM
yeah. dont let old timers brow beat you about bringing an 18" to the skeet range. I bring my benelli m4 to the range and people dont care, or theyre like, hey, thats the m4, the usmc shotgun. and i see other people bring their defensive shotguns as well. I saw someone bring a short PGO maverick. they couldnt hit anything but to each their own

Lee Lapin
August 29, 2009, 10:40 AM
OK, I won't tell you about our range in the pasture. 8^)

Practice doesn't make perfect- practice makes PERMANENT. You need to practice the right things, unless you want to 'groove' bad habits into muscle memory. Learn the right things to do with a defensive shotgun, and practice those things.

SAFETY FIRST. SAFETY LAST. SAFETY ALWAYS. Be safe. Stay safe. Safety has to be reflex. Or you are not safe to be around when you have a gun in your hands. Not safe for yourself. Not safe for your family, or neighbors, or innocent passersby. Learn the Four Rules. Live the Four Rules. Do that FIRST. Take a Hunter Safety Course or whatever equivalent your state offers. Doesn't matter how old you are. Do it. Then live it.

Almost anything you do that gets you trigger time with the shotgun you use for HD is good for familiarization. Once you know how to administratively load, prepare to fire, fire, fire again, make safe and unload the gun safely, you've done what you need to do as far as that set of lessons is concerned. That's the beginning. That's the early part of the journey to knowing your gun as if it were a body part. You can spend weeks or months doing these things, it doesn't hurt, You need not rush things. It takes time.

A lot of us learned these things over a period of years while we were growing up, at the hands of eagle-eyed fathers, uncles, grandfathers, or other various assorted Old Men. They never let us make a mistake and get away with it. They kept us in line and taught us well.

If you didn't ever have any Old Men of your own, the best substitute I can offer you in the here and now is Robert Ruark's book The Old Man And The Boy. Buy yourself a copy and read it several times. It's still in print, in paperback, and doesn't cost a whole lot. It's worth it, I guarantee you. It won't teach you one thing about home defense directly, but you'll learn a lot you need to know. And if you ever get over towards eastern NC where Ruark grew up, PM me and I'll take you and show you that little yellow house. It's still there. And still yellow.

You need to learn to shoot the shotgun first. Stationary targets, clays, doesn't matter what. Learn to shoot, by learning to safely perform the steps I listed above (load, make ready to fire, fire, fire again, make safe, unload). If you want help with that, the NRA has a lot of instructors across the nation teaching basic classes. Give them a look at http://www.nrainstructors.org/CourseCatalog.aspx and see if there is an instructor near you.

Once you learn to shoot, THEN you need to start learning to fight with a shotgun. Clays, plastic jugs of water, paper targets etc. don't shoot back. They don't attack you with guns or knives or clubs and adrenaline or drug-fueled rage.

The best way to learn to fight with a shotgun is to get training from someone who's very good at it. But before you go for training, you need the basics- you need to be absolutely, reliably, dependably safe in all aspects of your gunhandling. And you need to know how to shoot your shotgun safely. You can learn those things on your own and if you ever get to a serious gunfighting class with a professional instructor, you can concentrate on learning what that person has to teach you. If you are not safe on the firing line, you WILL get kicked out of a class, with no refund. If you go in not knowing the basics, you won't get what you should have gotten out of the class, and you'll slow down everyone else's learning too.

Everyone always complains that classes from 'known' professionals are too expensive. Except for people who have taken them... . Professional instruction cuts the time spent on your learning curve way down. A pro will catch stuff you're doing wrong that you didn't even know about, and set you straight. A pro will teach you things you'd never know you needed to learn if all you did was go out by yourself and blast targets.

And best of all, a pro will build your skills over time, all the while adding more and more and more pressure on you to perform. Gunfights = performance under pressure. No, nothing that happens on a flat range can equal the stress of a gunfight. But good training is as close as you can get without someone bleeding. I'm convinced most shooters let their egos get in the way of going to classes taught by professional trainers. They say it's too far to travel, it costs too much, it isn't worth it. I think that's nonsense. I think most people are scared of looking bad in front of a class of other shooters and a respected professional trainer.

I'd rather look like a ten-thumbed idiot on a flat range in front of a class and learn something (and I have done just that), than to have my life on the line and make that same dumb mistake for the first time. THAT is what good training is for. They call it "stress inoculation" in some places, like law enforcement and the military ( http://www.frontrangetraining.com/pages/killology/stress-inoculation/ ).

If you want to get an idea of what professionals do in class, watch their videos. Louis Awerbuck has a good one, though what he teaches has changed a bit since that one was made. As he says- "The state of the art is a moving target." I've heard Clint Smith's shotgun video is good, though I haven't seen it yet. The Second Amendment Foundation just sent out Rob Pincus' Fundamentals of Defensive Long Guns, and it's very good, though not exclusively focused on shotguns.

But most of all, give yourself time. It takes time to learn this stuff. Don't rush it. Learn the right things in the right order, and learn them well. The secret of the real professionals is that there are no advanced techniques- just a mastery of the basics. Learn the basics well and they will serve you well.

Stay Safe,

lpl
---------------------------------------
Robert Ruark book - http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?r=1&ISBN=9780805026696&ourl=The%2DOld%2DMan%2Dand%2Dthe%2DBoy%2FRobert%2DRuark

Louis Awerbuck video - http://shop.paladin-press.com/product/40/25

Clint Smith video - http://fmgstore.stores.yahoo.net/thradeshdvd.html

Rob Pincus video - http://www.imakenews.com/eletra/mod_print_view.cfm?this_id=1500775&u=valhalla&show_issue_date=F&issue_id=000381423&lid=b11&uid=0

inSight-NEO
August 29, 2009, 04:39 PM
"If eight rounds out of a SG isnt enough to deal with the matter at hand, then something is wrong."

Incorrect. Something is wrong the second you feel you need a firearm in your hands. At that point, why limit your ability to respond by some preconceived notion about how these encounters "should" go down? Carrying a full mag or a couple extra rounds takes exactly zero effort but, if needed, may save your life.

True enough. Personally, I believe (military notwithstanding), the genesis of greater capacity was due to many violent LE encounters which, in the end, would have benefitted from higher capacity weaponry. This is, of course, understandable by any means.

But....in regards to "civilian" HD encounters:

I believe its best to learn how do become effective with less ammo than relying on more ammo as a saving grace. I mean, c'mon, unless you are involved in a massive/extensive firefight, are more than say 5 rounds (out of a shotgun) really necessary to end an HD conflict occuring within 15 to 20 feet? In addition, I personally dont think loading a shotgun "to the hilt" is such a great idea if the gun is to be left "as is" for many, many months at a time (no thanks to Mr. Murphy and his proverbial law). Some may agree with me here...Im sure others wont; doesnt matter though because if it ever comes down to it, I may be forced to defend my life one day...not theirs.

Besides, I honestly enjoy practicing with less than max capacity as it "forces" me to become more adept at using minimal resources, so to speak. For some reason, when I load up all the way, I tend to become a bit more sloppy. But, this is a personal preference/situation....each to his/her own.

Nothing wrong with keeping extra ammo nearby, but practice/familiarity are going to go a heck of a lot further than what type of gun you have and how many rounds are contained within.




The chances of ever needing to use your HD shotgun are already infinitesimally small. Trying to predict how many BGs will be there when it happens is silly. Erring on the low side is even more silly.

True and true. But, if ones training relies on more and more ammo, then I fear one may become reliant on such a crutch. To me, its best to train on the lighter side of capacity...when it comes to HD duty anyway. After all, if you havent trained/acquired the ability to do what needs to be done within 5 or 6 rounds (for HD purposes), then chances are you either wont have the time or ability to make the other rounds count. See what Im getting at?

However, after all is said and done, its not truly my place to say "do this or dont do that." Its all up to what one feels is necessary in order to be comfortably prepared for an event such as a violent HD experience (as rare as it is purported to be). I just do not want to rely on strapping various ammo carriers on my SG (or feeling inclined to always keep it loaded at max capacity) in order to feel justifiably "prepared." Rather, I have tried to develop habits centered around, again, maximizing the use of minimal resources. Now, I do keep extra ammo nearby, but (in contrast to what I used to do) I now keep it off the gun. This works for me...if it does not work for someone else, so be it.

hogdogs
August 29, 2009, 05:03 PM
A lot of us learned these things over a period of years while we were growing up, at the hands of eagle-eyed fathers, uncles, grandfathers, or other various assorted Old Men. They never let us make a mistake and get away with it. They kept us in line and taught us well.
All of lee's post is spot on... But this paragraph is 100% a reflection of my youth. I was 10 and fully trusted to take my .410 or bow or pellet rifle out for the day... No cell phones for momma to keep tabs with me either. She would jokingly just kiss me and tell me not to come running home to her if I shoot myself as I left... Pocket full of shells as I leave and a game bag of supper on return... But I am a decent "critter gitter" for it and cherish those training days even if I got frustrated with all the grown up instruction at the time.
Brent

bababooey32
September 22, 2009, 03:57 PM
Thanks all...Especially Lee and Scattergun for your detailed answers. I think I will try to find some courses on basic shotgunning as well as fighting with long guns...Sounds useful and FUN!

oneounceload
September 22, 2009, 04:08 PM
I am not a hunter, so I have no other reason to ever fire a shotgun

There are millions of folks who shoot a variety of clay games that would whole-heartedly disagree with that statement. Try it, you might just find a reason for Saturday mornings besides yard work.......:D


Practice doesn't make perfect- practice makes PERMANENT.

Quite true - PERFECT practice makes perfect....IMPERFECT practice makes imperfect results, develops bad habits, flinches, etc......

bababooey32
September 22, 2009, 04:19 PM
One ounce...My Saturday mornings are already filled with another vice: golf.!!:D

I'd really like to try skeet/trap/clays. I'm thinking of buying an O/U just for that purpose!

oneounceload
September 22, 2009, 06:01 PM
One ounce...My Saturday mornings are already filled with another vice: golf.!!

WHAT?!?!?! You're not a doctor who plays on Wednesdays?!?!?!?!

Seriously, play golf on another day - go shoot sporting....once you get hooked, you'll think nicotine, alcohol, and heroin are easy to quit............


"Come to the dark side, we have cookies"

I can't believe they allow golf in TX - not with all you gun owners........

zombieslayer
September 22, 2009, 06:06 PM
Ive got a Mossber with the PG only and a 20" heat shrouded barrel and I amaze guys at the range by actually hitting clays!!! The funniest range day was when the scout master and some boyscouts set up a life size hannah montana and we took turns with my PG and some 00 buck!!:D
Ive got over 2000 rounds out of a PG and I've grown to love it

oneounceload
September 22, 2009, 06:39 PM
yeah. dont let old timers brow beat you about bringing an 18" to the skeet range.

nothing about brow beating - at many clubs, short barrels aren't allowed for a variety of reasons....noise being one of them

zombieslayer
September 22, 2009, 06:44 PM
Out at the range On SR40 east of ocala, its free, and shooting am 18 or 20'' barreled scattergun doesnt bother anyone. In fact, as many people shoot HD guns out there as skeet guns. :cool:
I'm really not a mall ninja, i just love my PG shotty. Ive got others with stocks, but the PG rides with me in a pool cue case everywhere!

oneounceload
September 22, 2009, 06:56 PM
been there - no thanks - WAY too many unsafe practices....want to seriously shoot some clays? go to Dunnellon - 5.5 miles east is Robinson Ranch Trap and Skeet

got_the_itch
September 22, 2009, 07:40 PM
i have a friend who went to prison for 10 years because he waited in his bedroom for the robber to come and killed him. he was mainly found guilty of murder because he was there waiting with out making his presence known and trying to scare off the intruder. the man had what my friend thought was a pistol (ended up being fake) and he took the shot, and spent 10 years because he didnt say get the F*** out of my house. "hunker down and wait".. not in western Washington

it may be different now, but im not taking the chance

I'd move...

I'd get a new lawyer.

rc
September 22, 2009, 11:56 PM
While an 18" barel is not ideal as oneonce pointed out and may not "swing" like a good field gun, the skeet range is a perfect place to practice loading and shooting repeatedly using cheap #8 birdshot as Lee indicated to contribute to muscle memory. I'm sure an experienced shooter will be wary around you because you don't have muzzle discipline and loading/handling down if you have simply bought a shotgun and a box of buck for the closet "just in case". You want to have absolute confidence you can handle and cycle your gun safely and competently. Missing a few clays is really no big deal if you learn how to safely handle your gun. You can always buy a longer vent rib sporting barrel if you enjoy clay shooting. Just learn to load and shoot, load and shoot, load and shoot. You could even shoot trap if you want but the ranges are longer and cylinder barrels throw patterns so large you can miss targets in the pattern at longer distances. If you have the ability to shoot on the skeet range "informally" just start with the high house and the low house stations so you can practice incoming and outgoing shooting. The side shooting is great practice but if someone is running away or to the side they are probably not a "threat" to you. Personally I think some of the best home defense shotguns have vent ribs and short 22 to 24 inch barrels with screw in chokes like turkey guns. However there is nothing wrong with a cylinder bore for home defense. rc

zombieslayer
September 23, 2009, 07:09 AM
I'll agree, there are unsafe people out at that range off 40, but I've been there alone before too. I'll try Dunnellon. At 40, they dont even know what COLD RANGE and HOT RANGE mean!! But yeah, yall, clays are good training with any scattergun

bababooey32
September 23, 2009, 10:03 AM
I can't believe they allow golf in TX - not with all you gun owners........

Sorry...I live in Austin. As many Texans have told me, "that's not TEXAS".

Golf is huge in TX. Our mild climate in the winter allows year-round play. It's long been a passion of mine, so I won't be giving it up anytime soon.

zombieslayer
September 23, 2009, 10:07 AM
golf balls are fun to shoot at

oneounceload
September 23, 2009, 10:26 AM
Dunnellon is shotgun only Trap, Skeet, 5-stand and FITASC - if you want slugs or rifle and pistol, head to Hernando Sportsmen in the Chassahowitzka WMA off 19

http://www.hernandosportsmansclub.com/

oneounceload
September 23, 2009, 10:31 AM
Sorry...I live in Austin. As many Texans have told me, "that's not TEXAS".

Golf is huge in TX. Our mild climate in the winter allows year-round play. It's long been a passion of mine, so I won't be giving it up anytime soon.
bababooey32 is online now Report Post

Used to live in Tyler and the Houston area - both have grown up a lot since I was there......

( if you like golf, come play the bazillion courses in this state, especially near Naples)

Back to topic - practicing for me means making sure I can load, reload, and unload without thinking - I'm NOT going to be clearing the house - I'm going to be in the bedroom calling 911 and pointing at the door

If you want to practice loading, get the AZOOM aluminum practice rounds - (many call them snap caps, but they really ARE practice rounds) - you can practice reloading, working the action, etc. safely

bababooey32
September 25, 2009, 08:59 AM
golf balls are fun to shoot at

My foursome might frown on that....Our head pro would definitely frown on it!!!

Snakum
September 25, 2009, 07:03 PM
Yes...violence of the utmost is certainly rampant there. However, Id wager you are far more likely to encounter such atrocities (on a semi-regular to regular basis) living in South Africa than Oklahoma.

I see you've never been to Lawton. :p:D