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ninjatoth
August 12, 2009, 10:30 AM
I am new to hunting,I went my first time last season.I am 29,and had no idea whatsoever that a person had to take hunters safety class unless they are 49+ years old this year.How would I know unless I had taken hunters safety class when I was 12 years old like my peers.Well,I was shocked to find out that adults had to take the class.I had to go with an "adult"lol this last season until I get my certificate.Well,I took the online exam without studying more than 5 minutes and got a 87% on the 75 questions,so I passed and printed out a field day pass.My main question is,what does a field day entail?

davlandrum
August 12, 2009, 10:51 AM
I can't speak to Michigan, but what we usually cover in field day are some hands on exercises so we instructors can evaluate understanding of firearms safety.

We do fence crossings (safe handling), we set up a 3 person "pheasant hunt" (zone of fire), we do some land navigation, some fire-starting/survival stuff. If we have time and facilities, we add to this basic list.

How would I know

It should be pretty clearly stated in the regs.

There are a lot of adults that have no experience with guns or hunting, so I am not sure why you are shocked adults have to take the class. I am actually appalled that Oregon does not require it for adults who have never had a hunting license before.

Pahoo
August 12, 2009, 10:55 AM
Basically the field day will cover safe gun handling and situations that you could encounter, in the field. Also a review of sorts on your exam. Depending on the class, you may have live-fire and then again, perhaps not. When you schedule your Field day, you will be given a contact and he or she will answer your question in details. Most of the folks I have seen at these classes, are adults and pretty savy. Once you get your certification, you will be in the system and set for life.



Be Safe !!!

ninjatoth
August 12, 2009, 11:09 AM
I guess it just seems weird to me since I been shooting rifles for 15 years with thousands of rounds and hundreds of hours of safety knowledge and all kinds of firearms use.shotguns,rifles,handguns,compund bows,I just never felt the need to hunt when I was a kid,I was into other things,so how would I know the rules,and was very shocked.I don't want some instructor my age telling me i'm shooting wrong or something when I've been developing my skills for years.

Doodlebugger45
August 12, 2009, 11:12 AM
I did my hunter safety course in 1973 I think when I was 14. Hunter safety was a pretty novel concept back then in TX. My certificate was number 7. LOL :D But I had to get it to hunt in Kansas.

As I recall, my field day was similar to the above. Seems like the main item he stressed was crossing fences. We just kind of wandered around the prairie for awhile and the main thing was to keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction all the time. We ended up at a gravel pit where we shot a .22 rifle at a paper plate half a dozen times. He wasn't interested in how tight a group my buddy or I could shoot. Just if we could fire it safely. Pretty basic stuff really. Don't ever have a live round in the chamber until you have your target in sight and are ready to fire. Don't lean your rifle against the fence or hold it in your hand when you're crossing. Always be aware of the locations of your hunting companions. Pay attention to surroundings that might be behind your target. And always always point the muzzle in a safe direction. No big deal if you've had a mentor that stressed these things to you from an early age.

davlandrum
August 12, 2009, 11:34 AM
The problem is not you. The problem is how does the state tell the difference between you and the guy who has never so much as shot a slingshot, but dropped by and bought a 7 mm Mag and now wants a hunting license.

We have a few adults that take the class, and I think that is great. I have had single moms in class, who are there for thier kids. I have had guys who have hunted for years, but now need an actual card to go to another state. Surprising some of the bad habits we pick up over time.

They should not tell you that you are shooting "wrong" unless it is unsafe. They are not teaching marksmanship.

ninjatoth
August 12, 2009, 11:55 AM
I guess i'm just nervouse about showing up to a class and towering above a bunch of kids and feeling akward.But in michigan anyone born after jan 1st 1960(49) has to take the class.And that is alot older than me.Now my next question:I got a .444,but i'm thinking of getting a revolver in 6" for hunting whitetail.Should I go with a .357 so I can practice alot with .38s,or get a .44 mag to be sure I can drop it,yet with less practice?

Pahoo
August 12, 2009, 01:42 PM
ninjatoth
To a certain degree, you feel your ego is taking a hit. It's neither just or fair and not suppose to be. You have to put it in the right perspective. Had a simular complaint from an Army Veteran that claimed he had shot everything from handguns to tanks. Before he could hunt in Colorado, he had two choices, take it in his state for free of take it when he got to Colorado and pay for it. Well, that is not what this is about. How would you expect your DNR to document your knowledge or experience and make an exception for folks like you? How do you want them to address your problem? As far as being intimidated by any kids, you will find that there probably won't be many of them there, if anyone is going to be intimidated, it's going to be them. You can be there to help them with your knowledge. This field day is a state requirement and the program is intended to present what indicates that you can demonstrate a reasonable amount responsibility. I do know that it is a painless process and most folks, including kids, have to attend the full class.


Be Safe !!!

Paul B.
August 12, 2009, 03:07 PM
"I guess i'm just nervouse about showing up to a class and towering above a bunch of kids and feeling akward.But in michigan anyone born after jan 1st 1960(49) has to take the class.And that is alot older than me.Now my next question:I got a .444,but i'm thinking of getting a revolver in 6" for hunting whitetail.Should I go with a .357 so I can practice alot with .38s,or get a .44 mag to be sure I can drop it,yet with less practice?
__________________
Sam T "

I think you will be in for a pleasant surprise. :D I've been teaching Hunter Ed classes for about 6 years now, and it will not only be a bunch of kids taking the class. The one we just started up is about 1/3 adults, the rest teens and kids down to 10 years old. The classes are a hell of a lot of fun and I'm sure you will enjoy it.
I believe all states use the same instruction manual with the only difference being the state will have it's name on the book. Ours is something like 26 hours long for an in class set of lessons or onecan take it on line which many are opting for. I do not like the on line course as there is no interaction between teacher and student.

Chapters in our book are:
1. Conservation and wildlife magagement
2. Firearms (This one takes two two hour classes covering long guns and handguns.
3. Bowhunting
4. Specialty hunting
5. Wildlife identification
6.Game recovery and are
7 Hunter resposibility
8. Survival and first aid
9 Special concerns

We have two range days, one at an archery place (PSE's range) whee the students get to shoot bows and arrows and the final range day where they get a feel for hunting on simulated hunts, simulated blood trail, map and compass work, and they shoot 15 rounds each in sitting, kneeling and prone positions under my watchful eye. (I run the rifle range portion.) You might feel a bit cramp with those kid size .22's ;) They also get hands on with shooting muzzle loaders as well on a different range. All in all a good program that is fun not only for those taking the class but for us insructors as well. :cool:
Granted, you classes may or may not be exactly like ours but I'd be willing to bet it'll be fairly close.
Paul B.

Gbro
August 13, 2009, 11:26 PM
I guess i'm just nervouse about showing up to a class and towering above a bunch of kids and feeling akward.But in michigan anyone born after jan 1st 1960(49) has to take the class.And that is alot older than me.Now my next
I do a bunch of 18 and older field tests every year. MN has both a home study packet or the online course through the IHEA (http://homestudy.ihea.com/) We have parents sit through the class with their children many times also. The standard FAS class is designed for youngsters and the adults are asked to not hijack the youth class. I will only look to the adults when the youngsters are stumped;). So if your experience is less than wonderful for you I would be surprised!

question:I got a .444,but i'm thinking of getting a revolver in 6" for hunting whitetail.Should I go with a .357 so I can practice alot with .38s,or get a .44 mag to be sure I can drop it,yet with less practice?
.357 is in my opinion a light one for taking whitetails.
Handgun hunting in itself(IMO) is for those that have the self control to pass many shots while looking for that perfect situation.
You are right that a 357 is a good versatile caliber, but with reloading equipment you could do the same thing with a 44mag, again just MHO!

Good Luck and be safe!

davlandrum
August 17, 2009, 10:07 AM
Get a .460. Lets you practice a lot with .45 Colt.

treg
August 17, 2009, 09:16 PM
Ninja - this is as close as I could find on the DNR websight. http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10363_39267-143673--,00.html
Contact anyone who does hunter safety near you. I'm sure they'll be very helpfull.
Good luck with your hunting.

Pahoo
August 18, 2009, 10:34 AM
Good reply treg and this format is pretty much shared by other midwest states. In this site, you can look up the schedule for your county and as stated, given a phone number for your contact. http://www.dnr.state.mi.us/recnsearch/

I also note that the states are using the IHEA website for their testing. It's pretty basic but their documented standard. I know some folks that choose not to take the course and just go to the test and most pass that where younger students would struggle. The only thing I see different is that the field day part for us, is four hours and total obligation is 12 hours. Michigan is showing total obligation is 10 hours. Also, our field day cost is higher than Michigan.



Be Safe !!!

Gbro
August 18, 2009, 10:41 AM
Also, our field day cost is higher than Michigan.

We do not charge for field day in MN.
The class fee is $7.50 for anyone, young or old. We may collect an additional $7.50 for expenses but have to account for every cent on the roster and our pocket isn't on the list. (I never collect any additional money, ever!).
I do not see why the State isn't charging adults more than a youth??

Gbro
August 18, 2009, 10:50 AM
I see that its not much different than our state. I just didn't look far enough.
*Field day costs cover the cost of supplies the instructor incurs for teaching the class. This fee is paid directly to the volunteer instructor.

The volunteer instructor only collects expense moneys like in our state:)