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View Full Version : Who knows of a great waterproof glue.....


Te Anau
July 23, 2009, 01:49 PM
that could be used for minor gun repairs (like my Turk Mauser handguard) and doesn't dry out while sitting in the tube/bottle waiting to be used? Gorilla glue drys out,polyurethane glue drys out,I got some "E6000" at Hobby Lobby & it dried out.I don't know what to try next. :confused:

johnbt
July 23, 2009, 02:38 PM
I've had an open bottle of Gorilla Glue for over a year. Squeeze out as much air as you can make certain the top is on tight. I glue it on. :)

The other way is to take the entire top off and not use the little spout part of it.

Either way, I have to wrestle it off with channel locks and heavy equipment.

Gorilla Glue makes a real mess when it expands, but it works, works, works.

John

goodspeed(TPF)
July 23, 2009, 02:46 PM
Underwater Marine epoxy. Love the stuff. Got mine from the local Farm&Fleet. LMK if it works for ya. -Goodspeed

ZeSpectre
July 23, 2009, 03:24 PM
Just a side note. Gorilla glue also seems to solidify if frozen and doesn't thaw out afterwards, just stays solid.

But Gorilla glue is AMAZING stuff!

For the OP.
If your glue keeps drying out I would recommend buying small tubes since it seems you go a long time without using the glue after opening.

DWARREN123
July 23, 2009, 03:47 PM
Try a marine/boat repair store.

Scorch
July 23, 2009, 03:55 PM
AcraGlas. It's just simply the best.

And Gorilla Glue, although amazing, leaves a white line wherever you have repaired anything. Not for guns, IMO.

MemphisJim
July 23, 2009, 04:04 PM
I own a cabinet shop and our preferred glue is Titebond II (Waterproof). Home Depot and Lowes sell it in 12 oz. squeeze bottles. I haven't used it on firearms furniture yet but I intend to when/if the need arises. Properly clamped and cured, it just doesn't let go.

Vanya
July 24, 2009, 02:58 PM
Titebond and the like are great for new work, but don't always adhere well in repair work, and they're very poor at filling gaps, which are hard to eliminate when repairing an old piece, especially if the damage itself is old.

For old wood... an epoxy that's made to adhere to it is the best bet. If you can find it, G2, made by a Canadian company called Industrial Formulators, is excellent, and not finicky about the exact mixing ratio (in fact, it's designed so you can vary it depending on how hard you want the epoxy to cure). Otherwise, get System Three, available at most woodworking specialty stores -- Woodcraft and the like. It's good to mix in some wood flour or sanding dust (if you only ever use your shop vac for sawdust, just scrape some of the fine stuff off the filter) -- mixing in some wood flour lets you control the viscosity, fills gaps better, and seems to make the repair stronger.

And epoxies don't dry out. Sometimes the resin turns white and semi-solid, but that's just reversible crystallization; set the bottle in warm water for a while, and it'll go right back to being a clear liquid, good as new.

Gorilla Glue is vile stuff, IMHO. I'd never use it on anything I cared about... :barf:

TailGator
July 24, 2009, 03:08 PM
. . . also seems to be quite attractive to dogs. There have been numerous reports (including a case I handled) of dogs chewing the bottle open and ingesting the glue. It then foams, expands, and hardens into a solid mass that has to be surgically removed from the stomach.

Vanya
July 24, 2009, 05:32 PM
Gorilla Glue . . .
. . . also seems to be quite attractive to dogs. There have been numerous reports (including a case I handled) of dogs chewing the bottle open and ingesting the glue. It then foams, expands, and hardens into a solid mass that has to be surgically removed from the stomach.

Yeah, I've read about that -- thanks for mentioning it. My dog adores hide glue, licks it off the floor and sneaks off to her bin with old dowels... but that's not gonna hurt her -- it says on the MSDS, "Not recommended for human consumption." :p

RobertRogers
July 24, 2009, 05:55 PM
I've had good luck with Gorilla Glue for a variety of projects that are are in heat, cold, dry, and wet conditions. Never failed me yet.

gunfighter48
July 24, 2009, 11:57 PM
Shoe Goop or Goo (it's marketed under both names), it's a water proof clear glue, like rubber cement but much much stronger. I used it to glue felt soles on my fishing wader boots. The boots would fall apart before the felt soles would come off!! You can usually find in it the hardware stores with the other glues.

SAIGAFISH
July 25, 2009, 12:03 AM
+ 1 for 2 part marine epoxy it will never ever ever let go
im a wood worker by trade,pattern maker.

Te Anau
July 26, 2009, 12:49 PM
Thanks for all the replies so far.Ideally,this would be a glue that is suitable for wood,ceramics,plastic etc. Just suitable for wood won't work.Yesterday,a friend let me use his "3M 5200 Marine adhesive sealant" and even though it works great,it too dries out (about 6 months after opening he said).Maybe these magic epoxies are the ticket.

Slopemeno
July 26, 2009, 07:16 PM
Shoe Goo, Goop, and E-6000 are all manufactured by Ecclectic Corp, and have small differences in their solvents depending on where they are marketed.

Here's the cool part. If you get some toluene, you can dillute the E-6000, Goop, ShoeGoo and reconstitute it. You can store it in an glass jar until youre ready to use it. You can also use an eyedropper and soften up the glue you used to glue something with, and remove or reposition it.

My friends and I fly a lot of R/C sailplanes here on the coast, and use E-6000 to glue servos and other components in. A friend of mine lost his plane in the brush below Hwy 1 for four years, and there it sat through four winters and summers. Another flyer went down and found a missing plane, plus the one that had been down there for four years. The survivor wasn't even fliable, but every glue joint done with E-6000 was solid, flexible, and ready to use.

I just go to my local Tap Plastics and buy myself a new tube every year or so. E-6000 is so handy I can't go without it.

As far as epoxy, buy quality. West Systems is good, so is MGS. You can buy things like Cabosil to thicken it, and dyes to make it match your existing stock wood.

langenc
July 28, 2009, 04:23 PM
I always liked Weldwood. It was apowder that required mixing with a little water prior to use. Have not had any in years-still available??

Vanya
July 28, 2009, 07:04 PM
I always liked Weldwood. It was apowder that required mixing with a little water prior to use. Have not had any in years-still available??
Yep... Ace Hardware. It's pretty good stuff as long as you don't mind that ugly red glue line. :)

Trust
August 12, 2009, 06:01 PM
Try the Gorilla Glue it's great stuff and they are making a version that does not give you the expanding mess anymore.

Hkmp5sd
August 12, 2009, 06:07 PM
J-B WELD (http://www.jbweld.net/products/jbweld.php) Use it at work all the time.

http://www.jbweld.net/img/jbweld_lrg.jpg

illinoisbrassman
August 13, 2009, 03:51 PM
I have used titebond and gorilla glue both for aquite a while, and never had a problem with it drying out. Maybe I am just lucky.