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Granger
July 19, 2009, 04:16 PM
It was made in 1895= with a 13 3/4 inch barrel, how do you go about registering it?

PetahW
July 19, 2009, 07:29 PM
Proceed carefully - There's a chance it could get seized, although I hope not.

AFAIK, all short-barreled rifles (shorter than Fed Law allows) were supposed to be registered during a now-lapsed amnesty period, and any subsequent sales of registered shorties need a transfer application/tax.

If it's already been registered by someone, the prior registrant needs to transfer it to the new owner.

If it's never before been registered, despite the amnesty period - I'm not sure what the outcome for the new owner might be.

IIRC, further info is available at http://www.nraila.org/federalfirearms.htm#Sec.%20922 or directly on the Federal ATF website.

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30-30remchester
July 19, 2009, 07:43 PM
The one thing to watch out for is if the barrel has been shortened to that length. If it was originally longer and shortened then you are in violation of federal law. You can not simply register it and get permission to own it. The only way you can register it and keep it is if it was originally manufactured with this length prior to 1932.

Malamute
July 19, 2009, 10:39 PM
People are still building short barrel rifles. I would guess, but am not sure, that if it was shortened after leaving the factory, it could till be registered.
As a precaution, you could pull the barrel off of it until you get it sorted out. Pulling a barrel isnt rocket science, tho decent tools is best. It's a 10 minute job for a 'smith. Last one I had swapped by a 'smith cost $15

You could also get an original standard length barrel from the time period and screw it in. Without a letter from the Cody Museum, it's hard to say if its orginal, tho the length is odd. Are you measuring from the back end of the chamber, or the front end of the receiver?

It would be more valuable than a standard gun if that was the original length from the factory. If it was done after leaving the factory, the value is decreased from a standard gun, and probably wouldnt be worth registering. It would be worth more rebarreled with a standard barrel.

PetahW
July 20, 2009, 07:50 AM
If you already haven't, measure the barrel length the same way the Feds do - close the bolt, drop a rod downbore and mark it at the muzzle crown, withdraw the rod and measure the length of the rod that was inside the barrel, to the mark.

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30-30remchester
July 20, 2009, 07:38 PM
I have to disagree with another opinion posted above. As I understand it you can not alter a rifle that was originally legal. There are manufacturers that produce shorter barreled firearms, but they must have a class 3 manufactures license. With this license they must serial number the gun seperately. And to own a rifle or shotgun with a shorter than legal length that was not manufactured that way is illegal unless you hold a class 3 license. The only way you can legally own a shorter than legal gun, is if the gun was originally manufactuered that short prior to 1932 and can be proven by company records, then get it registered with the ATF. However if it was manufactured after 1932 and shortened to illegal lenght then it must be surrendered.

Jdomin
July 21, 2009, 06:19 AM
if you winchester is original it is very vasluable with the barrel intact. i would get a letter from the cody museum to see if it was shipped in that configuration. atf has allowed original short barrel trappers.

mordecai
July 22, 2009, 01:48 PM
The ATF has removed many of these type of C&R guns from the NFA registry.
Check below to see if your rifle qualifies.

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/curios/2001index.htm

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/curios/1972-2007/section3.pdf
http://www.atf.gov/firearms/curios/1972-2007/section3a.pdf
http://www.atf.gov/firearms/curios/1972-2007/section4.pdf

Winchester_73
July 23, 2009, 09:30 AM
I have to disagree with another opinion posted above. As I understand it you can not alter a rifle that was originally legal.

This is actually not true AFAIK. The problem arises when and ONLY when the barrel is shortened from a legal length to an illegal length. Recently I was on the ATF website, the legal length for a rifle is 16 in and for a shotgun its 18 in. I was researching this because I found a guy who has a Marbles Game getter, with what I believe to be a shorter than 18 in barrel length. I asked him to measure it to verify. Many many people take say a 28 in shotgun barrel for example, and shorten to say 26 in. This is NOT illegal despite not coming from the factory in that exact configuration.

The posts regarding the amnesty period are spot on. If the gun was not registered at that time, now the gun will most likely be taken by the ATF unless its destroyed. I also don't believe a gun that was altered post manufacture could even be registered. The guns registered would have to be factory original I would think. It would most likely be a felony to sell the gun due to its illegal status if it was never regestered. Its a shame the game getter does not fall under the C&R umbrella that covers the old Frank Wesson single shot pocket rifles and the like. The Marbles Game getter was too recent manufacture, post 1898, to be under the C&R umbrella. Just another reason to despise the ATF.

johnwilliamson062
July 23, 2009, 10:37 AM
that if it was shortened after leaving the factory, it could till be registered.
I believe not if it was shortened after the amnesty, at least not legally.
You can SBR the rifle yourself, but you have to get the license before you do it. If it is already illegally shortened you can not get a retroactive license to make it legal. I do not believe the ATFE inspects the rifle you want to shorten, so I guess you could get the license and pretend like you shortened it after you received the license. I would demill it if that is the case though, talking about a pretty big felony ad a video on the news of your entire collection being manhandled into a swat van with a caption to the effect of "This Vet with associations with right wing groups such s the NRA had over a dozen firearms in his possession, one of which was illegally shortened..."

Scorch
July 23, 2009, 02:31 PM
Having just gone through this with a Win 1892 with a 14" barrel, you first need a letter as to how the rifle was shipped from the factory. If it was shipped with that barrel, you can get a waiver under C&R rules (I don't know the details of this, see a lawyer). If it was shipped with a longer barrel, you had better find a way to unscrew that tube and get a new barrel installed.

You can call the NRA for details or assistance in finding a lawyer to advise you, since I am not a lawyer.