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lizziedog1
July 6, 2009, 09:10 PM
I drew an anterless deer tag for this season. The area of this hunt will be such that the shot should not be much more then one hundred yards. There is a slight chance that a longer shot might be required.

I have two rifles that I shoot quite well. One is chambered in .45-70 and the other is a .280 Remington. I want to start working up a good load and start practicing.

Which caliber would you use?

taylorce1
July 6, 2009, 09:12 PM
Where are you hunting deer at? Is it from a stand or spot and stalk? What is the maximum range you might have to shoot? What do I really want to hunt with this year?

Ask yourself these questions and you will know what rifle to use.

lizziedog1
July 6, 2009, 09:24 PM
It will be a spot and stalk hunt. It will be in area that my cousin is very familiar with. It is semi-forested there. There are trees, but they are not very thick. He claims that my shot should be under 100, if not under 50 yards. However, a longer shot could be possible.

I also wonder which caliber, the .280 or .45-70, would cause less meat damage. This obviously will not be a trophy hunt.

liberty1
July 6, 2009, 09:43 PM
As it is not a trophy hunt I would go for the fun factor and use the 45-70.

taylorce1
July 7, 2009, 06:36 AM
As long as you are able to keep the long shots to 200 or less I would use the .45-70 if it is a quick handling rifle like a Marlin for spot and stalk hunting. If you are trying to shoot in any kind of trees even ones that aren't thick it will make long shots difficult for either rifle. Don't worry about meat damage with either rifle as long as you put the bullet behind the shoulder and through the lungs you will minimize your meat damgae.

Doyle
July 7, 2009, 07:11 AM
I'm going the opposite direction. I'll take flat-shooting over large mass.

Bolosniper
July 7, 2009, 11:17 AM
I agree with Doyle. Take the 280 Remington.

Big Ugly Tall Texan
July 7, 2009, 11:32 AM
Flatter shooting. Inherently more accurate. It gives a better chance of a clean kill. Besides, I'm a big 7mm fan.

gun nut
July 7, 2009, 11:32 AM
While either gun would be more than capable; between the short range and brush the 45-70 would be my choice.

Buzzcook
July 7, 2009, 11:50 AM
Which gun is more fun to shoot? Take that one.

Either will do fine for what you describe.

pilothunter
July 7, 2009, 12:08 PM
Quote:Which caliber would you use? .280 or 45-70

They are both excellent calibers. I'd suppose the .280 to be a bolt gun and the 45-70 to be a lever rifle:confused:. That being the case, and along with your statement about spot and stalk (stillhunting?) I'd choose the 45-70 as a faster handling rifle, capable of a quicker 2nd shot, if needed. I'd want a low-powered scope of 1-3 or 1-4 (or similar) on top, giving you 200yd possiblities and I'd recommend the LE ammo which would easily give you a 150-200 yd MPBR. I'd not be overly concerned with meat damage with either caliber. Better to have some meat damage than a lost animal. :D

Doodlebugger45
July 7, 2009, 10:58 PM
Well, sure the 280 is the modern whizz bang do-it-all cartridge and is the obvious choice to shoot a deer. But... there is just something so special about bringing home game with a cartridge that Custer was using at the Little Bighorn. And the thing is, IT WORKS! My most memorable antelope that I shot was with a 45-70 just because it isn't always easy to sneak up to 45-70 range on an antelope. If you think the shots will be in the 150 yard range, then for sure go with the 45-70. It is just fun!

trooper3385
July 8, 2009, 12:23 AM
+ 4 for the 280.

Skan21
July 8, 2009, 12:33 AM
Well, sure the 280 is the modern whizz bang do-it-all cartridge and is the obvious choice to shoot a deer. But... there is just something so special about bringing home game with a cartridge that Custer was using at the Little Bighorn.

Custer lost. Go with the .280.

jmr40
July 8, 2009, 06:40 AM
If you want to use an historical cartridge and are willing to go home empty handed take the 45-70. If you want to increase your chances of success take the 280. Both are good rounds, but are on opposite ends of the spectrum, and fill vastly different hunting roles.

roy reali
July 8, 2009, 07:07 AM
There is also a safety consideration. The .45-70 might also bounce off the deer. This could cause a dangerous ricochet. You should limit your .45-70 to close range gophers and chipmunks. Even then, consider head shots for humane kills.

taylorce1
July 8, 2009, 08:29 AM
If you want to use an historical cartridge and are willing to go home empty handed take the 45-70. If you want to increase your chances of success take the 280. Both are good rounds, but are on opposite ends of the spectrum, and fill vastly different hunting roles.

Thanks for the laugh! By how much will his chances be increased? You should always be willing to go home empty handed if you go hunting, it isn't called shooting now is it. I've made 50 yard shots with a side lock muzzle loader using patched round ball, on the open plains on mule deer it is all in how hard you are willing to work at it. There is more to hunting than using the most modern round.

It will be a spot and stalk hunt. It will be in area that my cousin is very familiar with. It is semi-forested there. There are trees, but they are not very thick. He claims that my shot should be under 100, if not under 50 yards. However, a longer shot could be possible.


Even lightly forested a .280 or .45-70 bullet isn't going to make it 100 yards unless you are just lucky. More than likely a 50 yard shot is going to be difficult without hitting something that will deflect a bullet since there is no such thing as a brush buster. Most game is still shot inside of 200 yards and the .280 has very little advantage over the .45-70 at that range.

There is also a safety consideration. The .45-70 might also bounce off the deer. This could cause a dangerous ricochet. You should limit your .45-70 to close range gophers and chipmunks. Even then, consider head shots for humane kills.

Thanks Roy LMAO! Still cleaning my coffee off of the monitor and keyboard!:D

jaguarxk120
July 8, 2009, 09:25 AM
At this point I do not think it is the cartridge you will be using. The main consideration is the rifles you have. How old are they, a old rifle could fail at any time, just when you have the deer in your sights and nothing happens when you pull the trigger!:barf: Now is the time to look at new rifles that will work properly and not fail in the field.:D

Always use a new rifle when hunting.:D At least that excuse worked for a while for the wife!:p

Art Eatman
July 8, 2009, 09:52 AM
With which rifle are you more comfortable? More accurate?

IMO, for shots around 100 yards or so, trajectory is of no concern. Kind of a case of which rifle seems like more fun for you to shoot.

If it's likely that you'll be sitting and watching at first light or late evening, the need for a scope might make a difference.

davlandrum
July 8, 2009, 09:53 AM
Neither.....

This sounds like a reason to go buy another rifle!!!!!:D

Catfish25p2000
July 8, 2009, 09:57 AM
Go with the .45-70. That is about the closest thing to shooting a deer with a slug. I doubt you will have to trail it very far, plus that is a cool round. I consider the .280 more of a 150yds+ rifle.