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View Full Version : Practicing round counts and mag swaps w/ one in the chamber


w_houle
June 28, 2009, 07:43 PM
I practice at my own private range even though I maintain muzzle discipline like at a public range... with that said:
I have a few guns that don't hold open after the last round and rather them always slamming shut I start off with a mag full +1 then run mags until target check/ change then I drop the mag and take the round in the chamber to make it look like a stovepipe. Now, how many would not like or feel comfortable with this?

csmsss
June 28, 2009, 07:51 PM
Not sure I understand why you would want to use a loaded cartridge as a holdopen tool, when other options are readily available, but that aside, you're not violating any of the essential principles of firearm safety and I'm not sure I understand why you might think you would be.

w_houle
June 28, 2009, 07:53 PM
It isn't a preferred method, but would rater use something than nothing for those times that I forget to bring my little delrin blocks.

Rich Miranda
June 28, 2009, 08:18 PM
Doesn't sound like a problem, W. If it works for you, I say do it.

orionengnr
June 28, 2009, 08:25 PM
Honestly, not sure what you are trying to say...

I always count rounds. if you are trying to train yourself to count rounds and stop one round from slide lock, fine. No problem.

But either you are not expressing yourself clearly or I am having a senior moment. And the latter is not likely. :)

armsmaster270
June 29, 2009, 08:24 AM
1. Nothing wrong with using a round to hold open but a pen would work just as good if your worried.

2. Counting rounds is something I prefer to do, as well as change mags while there is still one in the pipe. It's a good practice for a real scenario.

easyG
June 29, 2009, 08:35 AM
I start off with a mag full +1 then run mags until target check/ change then I drop the mag and take the round in the chamber to make it look like a stovepipe. Now, how many would not like or feel comfortable with this?
Maybe the confusion is on my end, but I really don't see why you would do this. :confused:

Is there some reason that you simply MUST have the slide open?

I would just fire off all the bullets in the magazine (always counting), then remove the magazine, work the slide one more time just in case I forgot how to count to 16 (for my Glock G22), and then leave the action closed.
No problem.

A_McDougal
June 29, 2009, 11:25 AM
Is this building good muscle memory, for when you need it?

Shadi Khalil
June 29, 2009, 11:47 AM
I'm having a tough time understanding the question/scenario..

armsmaster270
June 29, 2009, 02:14 PM
Some ranges require the slide be back when firing is over.

easyG
June 29, 2009, 11:25 PM
Some ranges require the slide be back when firing is over.
The OP stated that he practices at his own private range.

A_McDougal
June 30, 2009, 11:18 AM
A live round set as a stove-pipe, rather than in the chamber proper? I'd get a range flag instead, anything besides a live round to stick in there. Only because
1) you might forget to stovepipe it once, and that one time will catch you
2) somebody might somehow walk up to your gun while you are downrange, and if they are stupid/evil you've given them an easy way to shoot you.

Beauhooligan
July 9, 2009, 01:56 AM
If what you are talking about is what is known as a "tactical reload", counting rounds fired until there is a pause in the action, then swapping magazines so that if the dance begins again, I have a full magazine and one in the pipe; I've been practicing that process for years. I do not, if given the chance, want to fire the weapon dry. This is also why I do not favor magazine disconnect safeties. In a fight, I would prefer to count and make my magazine change with a round in the chamber, that I can fire if surprised, than shoot dry and have my life decided by my ability to make a speed load.

Using loaded rounds, spent cases, or other objects to prop actions open is unsafe silliness that should be avoided even in practice.:confused:

rusherbob
July 9, 2009, 02:07 AM
or, just keep some old wooden clothes pins, or pencils , or anything. Why possible dent or damage a good round?

buzz_knox
July 9, 2009, 08:33 AM
Practicing round counts is fine, but only with the understanding that no one counts in the street. You may not shoot to slidelock but you won't have a clue how many rounds are in your weapon if you have to fire it.

As for tactical reloads for pistols, there's apparently been one case in which a tac load was performed in a fight and that was done after the shooting was done and the officer had no clue he'd done it. Everyone else tends to drop their mag on the deck or forget to reload at all. Things are different for rifles after Mogadishu. Mags are retained but there are also far more mechanisms for facilitating this (550 cord, Ranger plates, dump pouches) than for pistols.