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skydiver3346
June 27, 2009, 09:37 PM
I need some help from anyone out there who has experience with the Remington Managed Recoil ammo, (especially in .308 if possible).

Got my daugter a Remington model 7 rifle and she is a little recoil shy at this time so thought about getting some mangaged care ammo in .308 to match this rifle. Do you think it is still good enough and adequate to take whitetails? I know they say it does, but would be interested in any real life experience with this ammo. Thanks

attila787
June 27, 2009, 09:51 PM
In my opinion you should be fine. Why didn't you get her something like a 243 or 7mm 08?

skydiver3346
June 27, 2009, 10:06 PM
Already had the Remington Model 7 in .308 with Zeiss scope on it. Very nice and lightweight set up.

Buzzcook
June 28, 2009, 01:28 AM
Very nice and lightweight set up.

That's part of the problem, light weight makes for heavy recoil.

Managed recoil rounds are fine. Just take into account the different ballistic characteristics and there's no problem. If you reload it's possible to bring the .308 down to 2200fps and still have a pretty good deer rifle. It changes the .308 into a .30-30

treg
June 28, 2009, 10:02 AM
My daughter shot her first deer at age 13 with the Remington .30-06 MR load (velocity and bullet are the same as .308) and performance was outstanding. Heart / lung shot at 80 yards. She liked shooting those loads and it was an easy transition from the .22 to the .30-06. A memorable time. No milk jug was safe!

banditt007
June 28, 2009, 03:10 PM
If you look at the bullet weight and velocity you can just look at a lesser power cartridge that has the same specs. and if that gun is considered good enough for white tail there you go. No personal expereince but everything i've heard of/read about them, shows they are just fine, just keep it within 200 yards preferably less.

langenc
June 29, 2009, 07:41 PM
If you reload make your own 'reduced recoil' ammo. Check Hornadys website for instructions on loding reduced for any caliber.

If cant find it-pm me.

Doodlebugger45
June 30, 2009, 01:14 AM
I've shot the managed recoil loads in 308 just for fun. I thought they were pretty accurate and I would have no problem using them for hunting whitetails at all. Sure you can reload the equivalent, but if she's only going to shoot 30-40 each year it's easier to just buy a couple boxes and be done with it.

Doyle
June 30, 2009, 07:25 AM
My Remshoot program doesn't show a listing for Managed Recoil in .308. Are you sure there is one in that caliber?

Jack O'Conner
June 30, 2009, 04:20 PM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/Remingtonmanagedrecoil.jpg

MIDWAY Shooter's Supply can deliver to your door if local shop is not willing to stock this ammo for you. But I'd ask the local shop first.

Before this amazing ammo was developed, it WAS COMMON to buy a smaller caliber for a youngster. Then as he (she) grew up, the rifle was sold and a bigger caliber was purchased. In my opinion, those days ended when Remington and FEDERAL developed low recoil ammo.

MIDWAY's site has un-biased reviews by actual buyers of this product. These reviews speak for themselves.

125 grain core-lockt will not bounce off a 300 lb mountain muley. Anyone who says this ammo is less lethal than other Remington products does not comprehend bullet jacket thickness + design related to forecast impact velocity. I highly recommend this amazing ammo for new hunters or for that matter any hunter who appreciates accurate low recoil ammo.

Good hunting to you.

Jack

Greybeard
July 4, 2009, 12:16 AM
I've not used the low recoil loads yet on any critters, but have used it in 30/06 for training new shooters. Point of impact at 100 yards has very little difference from that of the Hornady Light Magnum loads for which my Model 700 is normall zeroed. Low recoil loads from the major mfgrs. are a great innovation - and have plenty of "ump" to take deer cleanly at normal distances.

Dannyl
July 6, 2009, 03:58 PM
Hi,
On thursday I am taking the family to Namibia, where I will be hunting Oryx, Kudu and springbuk with my Rem 700 60-06.
My preferred load is a 180Gr BTSP hornady interlock at 2550 FPS.
Grouping is 3/4" at 100M.

My wife, who weighs 44 Kg asked me to let her hunt a springbuk this time, and I ended up tailoring a load for her, I load for her a 150 Gr' Hornady SST, at 2450 FPS. it groups 1/2" at 100M.
We also added a small pad made out of bakpackers mat, which she holds under her bra, to improve recoli absorbtion. when practicing she has been able to shoot up to 25 shots in a single session without any ill effects.

With 3 practice sessions she is now able to hit consistenly within a 6" circle at 300M, from a sitting position with the rifle resting on a portable tripod, which is a practical position for hunting.

I have the rifle zeroed at 200M, and at 100M the 180 Gr impacts 2.5" high whereas the 150Gr hits 2.8" high, at 300M the 180Gr impacts 10.5" low, while the 150 Gr hits 9.5" low.

This means that for hunting purposes the trajectory is pretty much the same and there is no need to re-adjust the scope when switching bullets.

For those who wonder why I don't just go ad buy a more gentle calber rifle for her, my answer is that here in South Africa it can take up to 18 MONTHS to get a license approved, so for now this is a good solution.

Rgds,
Danny

Bolosniper
July 7, 2009, 11:42 AM
The addition of an Edwards Recoil Reducer into the buttstock and a Pachmayr Decel Pad will tame down the recoil, even on large capacity magnums and African dangerous game cartridges. The Edwards design utilizes a spring and weight to slow down the kinetic energy so that the shooter experiences a "push" instead of a "punch". The the Decel Pad adds even more kinetic energy absorption. The last and final step we use in recoil management, and it is standard on all magnums is a muzzle brake with a thread protector for use with the brake removed (primarily while hunting). That would preclude the need for underpowered managed recoil ammunition.

Extreme recoil is subjective, and recoil is an accuracy killer, period. A well designed field rifle should be lightweight as someone has to hump it in the bush, but lightweight rifles do hit the shooter much harder (or more accurately much faster).

pilothunter
July 7, 2009, 12:16 PM
Quote:
Before this amazing ammo was developed, it WAS COMMON to buy a smaller caliber for a youngster. Then as he (she) grew up, the rifle was sold and a bigger caliber was purchased. In my opinion, those days ended when Remington and FEDERAL developed low recoil ammo.

MIDWAY's site has un-biased reviews by actual buyers of this product. These reviews speak for themselves.

125 grain core-lockt will not bounce off a 300 lb mountain muley. Anyone who says this ammo is less lethal than other Remington products does not comprehend bullet jacket thickness + design related to forecast impact velocity. I highly recommend this amazing ammo for new hunters or for that matter any hunter who appreciates accurate low recoil ammo.end quote

I totally agree. This ammo makes it simple for the non-handloader to purchase a larger than marginal caliber for small-framed shooters, which can be then be updated with standard fare when the shooter is large enough. I found an alternate use with a .270 using MR ammo for my 78 yr old Father. He wouldn't even consider a shot over 150yds at this point and this allows him to use a familiar rifle, with much lighter recoil.

Jack O'Conner
July 7, 2009, 06:23 PM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/30-06Lite.jpg

Don't kid yourself. This 30-06 ammo is accurate and deadly on deer sized game to 200 yards or so. Why purchase a .243, 250 Savage, or other low recoil rifles when this terrific ammo solves the problem with ease?

Jack

tandom
July 9, 2009, 02:22 PM
I have a half a box of Federal .308 170gr low recoil power-shock ammo, not Fusion. They worked out fine for deer hunting a couple of yrs ago. I don't see them any longer, only the Fusion. Anyone have any info?

skydiver3346
July 9, 2009, 04:08 PM
Thanks bud for the helpful info on the managed recoil loads by Remington. I just bought two boxes for my daugter's model 7 and we will be heading out to the range this weekend. Appreciate everyone's help.

Hunley
July 9, 2009, 08:25 PM
It's all I've used (with the exception of some standard ammo when I first bought the gun) in my Ruger M77 MkII in 7mm Rem Mag. It's got a stainless barrel and synthetic stock. Very light, and the recoil was sharp. I was hard to shoot standing up, even after installing a Limbsaver. 75% of my lumbar is fused and the harsh recoil rattles the titanium something fierce.

Bought the managed recoil round and loved them. In 7mm Mag, it is still a bit much for me to do anything more than a few rounds at a time.

As for stopping power, it drops deer quick with a well placed shot. They didn't even kick or run.

sc928porsche
July 10, 2009, 07:00 PM
I think your choice of 308 for your daughter is just fine. The MR's should work fine for now and later, when she grows accustomed to it, you can get her into full loads. With the full loads, she will become comfortable hunting just about anything she wishes. Here's to many many years of delightful hunting for you and your daughter.

keano44
July 11, 2009, 04:12 PM
I wish I had found this thread sooner...
I can give you answers based on firsthand experience with Remington managed recoil ammo in 308 Win. My deer rifle is a Ruger M77 II in .308. My handload for it uses 150 gr. Hornady BTSP bullets. My nephew (9 yrs. at the time) killed his first deer, a 110# doe, at about 70 yds., with my rifle and the managed recoil ammo. The following year, he killed a six-point buck at 150 yds.
The (125 gr., .308)MR ammo is engineered to shoot to the same point of impact as standard loaded 150 gr. hunting ammo. It does! There was no need to change the scope settings for the MR ammo when letting him practice at 100 yds., and then hunt with the rifle. Then after youth hunt weekend, I was able to use my rifle and ammo without having to change the scope back again.
My hunting partner has a son the same age as my nephew. He bought his son, who is smaller than average for his age, a Remington .308 rifle and the kid has been killing two or three deer/yr. with it and the MR ammo for four years now.
I think it is great that you can give a young man (or lady) a rifle that they can grow into and let them use the MR ammo as long as they need to.
I would recommend keeping the shots under 200 yds., and only clean, responsible, supervised shots be taken.
I have noticed a number of the deer shot with the MR ammo were not pass-through shots, that, IMO, would have been pass-through's with full-load hunting ammo.

banditt007
July 11, 2009, 11:04 PM
as for pass through shots, perhaps this is where the federal/fusion low recoil ammo will shine. Instead of the Remington's fast/light bullet they went slow/heavy. I think the slow and heavy would be better if you are a hunter that needs that lower recoil but also wants the highest chance for pass through shots. Also (obviously) your best chance for a pass through is going to be a broad side in the ribs out the ribs shot.

T. O'Heir
July 12, 2009, 12:33 AM
"...lightweight..." Yep. That's the issue. 6.5 pounds is really light for a .308. The muzzle blast and noise from the 20" barrel doesn't help either. Add a recoil pad to a stock that fits her(if it doesn't fit her, it'll hurt to shoot) and one of the 'in stock' recoil reducers. A muzzle brake will lessen the felt recoil, but it'll increase the noise.

freakshow10mm
July 12, 2009, 12:50 AM
We load a lot of reduced recoil loads for youngsters in the fall. We use Barnes bullets exclusively as they don't give up penetration in light weights like the big name loads. We load the 270, 308, 7mm-08, and 30-06 to match the recoil of the .243 Winchester, about 10lbs of recoil energy. Our loads are 2700-2900fps and will kill as efficiently as the standard loads.

Vanya
July 14, 2009, 11:53 AM
I like the Remington RR loads a lot, in my .270... There's no appreciable difference in the POI at 100 yards, so I can practice with it as much as I want and be very comfortable -- and then I have the choice of either hunting with it, when I'm not going to be shooting out beyond 200 yards or so, or hunting with the "full-strength" stuff, when, for a few shots, I'm really not going to be bothered by the recoil.

big26john
July 15, 2009, 08:49 PM
The recommended minimum energy to take a whitetail is 900 foot pounds. You can go onto remingtons website and go to the ballistics section. You can put the caliber and load in and it will give you the velocities, bullet drop and energies. You can stay over 1000 ft-lbs to be safe. However with the 125 grain bullet you are good to around 250 yards (300 would be pushing it). If you keep to that distance you should be fine.

As with anyshot placement is the most important thing.

freakshow10mm
July 15, 2009, 11:40 PM
Yet the .357 Mag with a mere 500 ft lbs of muzzle energy, which is the point where 0% of game is actually shot, kills well beyond 100y. KE figures are for bean counters.

Dannyl
July 16, 2009, 01:34 AM
Hi All,
we are back from our hunting trip.
I am glad to say that with proper practice with reduced charges reloads (150 Gr hornady SST, loaded for 2400 FPS from a REM 700 30-06) my wife became very proficient with this rifle.

because of the long distance shots that are the norm for springboks in the area where we were hunting ( grassland plains with no cover for a closer stalk) I convinced her to use a slightly higher load for the hunt ( same bullet loaded for 2650 FPS) and I zeroed the rifle for 300 M.

She took her first buck ever, a nice sprinbok, with a well placed shot to the base of the neck from a distance in excess of 350M. as I expected, the adrenaline (and a recoil pad made of backpackers foam matt and placed under her T-shirt) helped her not to notice the heavier recoil.

IMO, the practice with lower loads, helped her get to the point where she can concentrate on aiming, breath and trigger control without worrying about the recoil.

I would have used the load of 2400 FPS for ranges up to 250M ( for animals of Springbuk - Whitetail size; for larger animals I stick to 180 Gr' bullets), but at longer distances, the bullet drop is excessive to be of practical use.

I shot a large Oryx from 250M , this one was taken with a 180Gr Hornady SST fired at 2550 FPS (30-06). in both cases bullet accuracy an expansion was optimal, we took two animals and fired one shot each.


I hope this is helpful to someone.

Regards,

Danny