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View Full Version : ACKKK RUST in my barrel.


MuscleGarunt
June 9, 2009, 12:54 AM
Lesson learned from this. After you clean your rifle, even if your going to shoot it next week, FOR THE LOVE OF GOD PUT OIL IN YOUR BARREL!

I went out to the shop and glanced at my Mosin, I saw some red dust in the crown of the muzzle. I figured it was copper fouling, no biggie. Upon closer inspection it was RUST!!!!!:eek:

Just surface rust mind you, but I shot this rifle 3 days ago and cleaned it thoroughly with Hoppes #9 and figured I was going to shoot it next week so I would skip the oil in the barrel part, one less thing to do before shooting. Well in 3 days it started to RUST!!!!:barf:

So no matter what, even if I am going to shoot it the next day, I am oiling my barrel, it's worth the extra minute it takes to remove it before shooting. :o

liberty1
June 9, 2009, 12:57 AM
You either live in a very humid climate or have been shooting very corrosive ammo. I have never had that happen and rarely oil the barrel.

TheNev
June 9, 2009, 07:09 AM
:confused: I've never oiled any barrel, and I live in super-humid St. Louis. No rusting issues here.

simonkenton
June 9, 2009, 11:30 AM
I have a beautiful M39 SkY.
I cleaned it with the ammonia and water patches.
A week later I ran a patch down the bore, it was covered with red rust!
Took a half dozen patches to get one to come out clean.

Now I use a different cleaning technique.

MuscleGarunt
June 9, 2009, 12:22 PM
Could you share your technique? I clean vigorously and thoroughly with Hoppes #9, bottle says it cleans corrosive deposits.

jsmaye
June 9, 2009, 02:57 PM
...cleaned it thoroughly with Hoppes #9...

...cleaned it with the ammonia and water patches. A week later I ran a patch down the bore, it was covered with red rust...

The corrosion is caused by the metallic salts from the primers. Oils and solvents do not dissolve the salts - the scrubbing may physically remove some of them, but will just re-distribute the rest. Regular clean water will dissolve and remove the salts. Anything more (ammonia, soap, etc.) is either ineffective or overkill.

MuscleGarunt
June 9, 2009, 03:37 PM
Well Hoppes says it removes corrosive salts?

simonkenton
June 9, 2009, 04:40 PM
I get a sauce pan and put a couple of quarts of hot water in it.
Squirt some liquid dish soap in it and put it on the floor.
Remove the bolt.
Put a patch on the cleaning rod.
Stick the muzzle into the water, and run the patch from the breech all the way to the muzzle.
Draw back, all the way to the chamber.
Repeat a dozen times.
Bye bye to all corrosive salts, and a bunch of other nasty gunk.
Use a couple of dry patches, then clean as normal.

US ammo in WW2 was corrosive, this is how the Marines cleaned their rifles in WW2.

Dr. Mauser
June 9, 2009, 05:27 PM
little confusing, but I think I can manage...should I use the same method to clean my K98s after using the Turkish surplus crap?

Drachenstein
June 9, 2009, 09:35 PM
We use to come in from the field and clean the weapons in the shower, Hot soapy water and then LSA or later breakfree

jsmaye
June 10, 2009, 07:20 AM
Well Hoppes says it removes corrosive salts?

...cleaned it thoroughly with Hoppes #9 ...Well in 3 days it started to RUST!!!!

Well, you decide - does it or doesn't it? ;)

simonkenton
June 10, 2009, 09:44 AM
Supposedly the ammonia/water patches work also.
I know guys who swear by it.
I swear at it.
Not only did it leave me with a rusty bore, but, it will eat the finish right off of the wood.

Ammonia didn't work for me but the hot soapy water will not fail to clean out all corrosive salts.

jsmaye
June 10, 2009, 09:53 AM
The water in the ammonia/water solution removes the salts. The ammonia in the ammonia/water solution removes the finish.

At best, ammonia is overkill. At worst, it's a stripper.

johnwilliamson062
June 10, 2009, 10:28 AM
I grease a patch and send it through. No joking. I have started using grease for EVERYTHING.

Alright, there is one exception, my "GOTO" guns. Sometimes I go a long time without shooting them. I worry the grease will gum up while they are stored, so I use lighter oils on them. It isn't as good, and if I was more dedicated to cleaning and relubing guns I had not fired I would use grease.

jhenry
June 10, 2009, 06:12 PM
As has been pointed out, the issue is the corrosive salts left as residue from the priming compound in almost all surplus ammo (Swiss excepted), and even some new manufactured eastern european stuff. I have never had a single issue with rust in my Mosins. This is what I do. I use Windex and run maybe 3 or 4 patches through, then one to dry. I then clean with Hoppe's #9 with a brush, then a couple of patches as usual. I use Sweet's 7.62 when I need to get the copper ot. I lube with Break Free. Easy, cheap, and no rust.

MuscleGarunt
June 10, 2009, 06:14 PM
I'll have to try that windex out.

rantingredneck
June 10, 2009, 08:45 PM
I get a sauce pan and put a couple of quarts of hot water in it.
Squirt some liquid dish soap in it and put it on the floor.
Remove the bolt.
Put a patch on the cleaning rod.
Stick the muzzle into the water, and run the patch from the breech all the way to the muzzle.
Draw back, all the way to the chamber.
Repeat a dozen times.
Bye bye to all corrosive salts, and a bunch of other nasty gunk.
Use a couple of dry patches, then clean as normal.

EXACTLY!!!!

This works well for cleaning corrosive deposits from any gun that you can do a complete pass through with a rod. Works well with inline muzzleloaders, surplus bolt guns, etc.

The cleaning patch forms a vaccuum and draws water up into the barrel flushing everything out. A few passes and you are good. Then just dry and apply a light coat of oil.

MagnumWill
June 11, 2009, 12:25 AM
+1 on the Windex. I hose the bore and action down with it, then run through it with S&W cleaner, then oil with either Hoppe's #9 or a fair amount of Jig-A-Loo. That Jig-A-Loo is good stuff, i tell ya. :)

Dr. Mauser
June 11, 2009, 02:48 AM
any advise for cleaning a K98? I dont want to ruin the one I shoot (My Grandfather brought it home after the war)

MuscleGarunt
June 11, 2009, 03:08 AM
If you shoot handloads or factory modern stuff just clean as usual. If it's surplus berdan primed corrosive stuff use the windex and hoppes method and oil the barrel after cleaning. Remember to remove the oil before shooting.

B. Lahey
June 11, 2009, 03:24 AM
HOPPE'S DOES NOTHING FOR CORROSIVE RESIDUE

Your own experience should tell you that, but I guess not everyone believes their own eyes.

Hot water with a little dishsoap in it works as well or better than Windex, and it's cheaper. Almost free, in fact. If you are saving pennies by shooting corrosive milsurp, why blow it on blue liquid when water works great?

Hot soapy water, brush, hot soapy water, dry, clean and oil as usual. It works. Hoppe's and oil do not work.

simonkenton
June 11, 2009, 10:23 AM
Are you serious about the K98?
Pull the bolt, get the saucepan with the hot soapy water on the floor, get to work!

gotguns?
June 11, 2009, 10:35 AM
If you use water what is the best way to dry the gun out completely? I ask in reference to a AK-47.

Chipperman
June 11, 2009, 03:33 PM
Wait...... You want to CLEAN an AK?!?!? :confused:


;)

If I use water or any water-based products like MPro7, I will hand-dry as much as possible, then use CLP afterward to displace any water left.

rantingredneck
June 11, 2009, 04:19 PM
If I use water or any water-based products like MPro7, I will hand-dry as much as possible, then use CLP afterward to displace any water left.

Yep, and the hotter the water you use the more will evaporate. Meaning less you have to swab out afterward.

Dr. Mauser
June 11, 2009, 08:18 PM
Should I the stock off and just clean the barrel or leave the stock on and put the barrel in and wash it that way?

MuscleGarunt
June 12, 2009, 01:20 AM
Leave it in the stock but keep the stock out of the water.

Joat
June 12, 2009, 09:06 AM
I use the pot of soapy water method. To remove the water from all the nooks and crannies, I use my compressor and a blow gun. 60 psi doesn't leave much water behind.:D

Joat

P5 Guy
June 12, 2009, 03:04 PM
In my M44s (now at their new home), K98/48s, #4mk1, M1903A3s and M1 Garands.
If the SRO will let me I run some water soaked patches thru the bores right after shooting, and then dry the bore and lightly oil. If it's against the ranges rules and I have to wait until I get back home I'll heavily oil the bore. Spray cans of Kroil for this.
Once back home I boil a pot of water and put the muzzle into the water and run the cleaning rod with a tight fitting patch up and down in the bore several times. Dry the bore and inspect for other fouling. Then I'll clean that out with Butch's or Hoppes Benchrest. Oil lightly and inspect the bores over the next few days and repeat if I see(which I never have had to do)any thing amiss.
Also wipe the bolts and the gas system of semi-autos out with hot water, dry and oil as appropriate.

spacemanspiff
June 12, 2009, 03:43 PM
My shooting days are far and few between now, but back when I shot every weekend, I'd always have my K98 and pump some rounds through it, old surplus corrosive ammo, but I'd clean it religiously.

Until I caved in to my retardo roommates complaints about the smell of solvent and then I got lax. Eventually I moved out, and my new roommate offered to stash my guns in his safe when I was moving in. So I did, and forgot about it, until this last winter. I dug my beloved k98 out and discovered the barrel is pitted and dark.

Really wanted to kick myself for that, cause on the outside its a decent rifle, my first long gun I bought and I place its origin to 1936, IIRc. I went through at least 5,000 rounds with it.

Now its a wall hanger. I'll replace it with another shooter sometime in the future.

p99guy
June 12, 2009, 10:37 PM
One Product to try is called Ballistol, its the stuff developed for the German Army, and was used in two world wars. This stuff is the original "CLP"
to clean corrosive residue its mixed one part Ballistol to 9 parts water, and then used full strenth as a bore cleaner /and preservative. They also used
it on the wood stocks. And most surprizingly as a antiseptic for battlefield wounds.

I have tried it as of late and find it really is decent stuff..won't poisen you if you get it on you, and don't stink the place up with noxious fumes. its easy to use....I can see why the German military used it most of the 20th century.

I had also been using U.S. issue corrsive ammo bore cleaner of WW2/Korea vintage , and windex, and boiling water with a small amount of dish soap as a wetting agent to compare.

I managed to almost ruin a really nice No4 MK1's bore about 5 years ago shooting a box of S&B commercial soft point that was clearly marked on the box non corrosive...I put off cleaning it and a couple of days later the bore was full of rust. Cleaned and cleaned and the the bore is dark to this day( was bright and shiney before that ) :(

robmkivseries70
June 13, 2009, 09:12 AM
Hi All,
For my MN I boil a large tea kettle of water. I use dish soap with water and scrub the bore. I take the rifle out of the stock and rinse the bolt, magazine well and rifle (Inside and out) with the hot water using the sink for the over flow. The hot water helps the parts dry. Before I do any more cleaning, I wash the gunk off the cleaning rod and brush then I rinse thoroughly so I don't risk transfering any salt. I finish up with a black powder solvent and finally Kroil. I have an M1 on which I did a good job on the bore but missed a spot outside the chamber. A constant reminder as to the power of corrosive ammo. As my BIL says,"It's just salt." rinse thoroughly and protect the metal afterwards. BTW, I believe ammonia itself is corrosive, hence I would avoid the window cleaners.:barf:
Best,
Rob

Te Anau
June 13, 2009, 02:27 PM
Today's Hoppes #9 just won't cut it for corrosive residue. :mad:

MuscleGarunt
June 14, 2009, 12:52 AM
My word I tried the soapy water in the sauce pan method. You should have seen the opaque salt water flowing from the barrel. It was like half a cup of mortons in there.:eek:

Glad I got it out!:D

I'm a believer.

riggins_83
June 14, 2009, 01:03 AM
We have pretty high humidity in Minnesota at times, too. My dad's old Winchester 38-55 rusted really badly from sitting uncleaned for years (and unfired). I like to lubricate the gun with Shooter's Choice FP10 then lightly oil the barrel with Remington Oil. Anything that's going to be packed away for a longer period of time gets grease or thicker oil. Sometimes it can be like surface rust on brake rotors after a rain.. still not something anybody wants on their gun!

Dingoboyx
June 14, 2009, 01:55 AM
A good bore brush, clean it with wads and Inox (like WD40) then swab it dry... then go shoot a sh!tload of good clean burning ammo thru it :D

Then a basic clean and leave lightly oiled with Inox to stop further rusting ;)

Repeat until you get a sore shoulder or run out of ammo :D

m.p.driver
June 14, 2009, 05:45 PM
Was shooting one of my M1's,columbian 30-06 ammo made in like 1974,got back from the range and had to pack for vacation.One week later came home to a sewer pipe.

jsmaye
June 15, 2009, 07:39 AM
My word I tried the soapy water in the sauce pan method. You should have seen the opaque salt water flowing from the barrel. It was like half a cup of mortons in there.

Really. That much salt in there? I would have thought your barrel long gone if there was that much corrosive residue in there.

BobbyT
June 15, 2009, 03:48 PM
It's not actually "salt", as in table salt. It's a mixture of metal salts, compounds that separate into ions in water (and unfortunately tend to oxidize iron).

It's usually potassium that's the problem. So you have a barrel full of potassium chloride, which with the tiniest bit of moisture gives you K+ and Cl- ions.

MuscleGarunt
June 15, 2009, 07:54 PM
I keep my barrel well oiled when not is use and that must have saved it.:D

jsmaye
June 16, 2009, 07:38 AM
It's not actually "salt", as in table salt. It's a mixture of metal salts, compounds that separate into ions in water...It's usually potassium that's the problem. So you have a barrel full of potassium chloride, which with the tiniest bit of moisture gives you K+ and Cl- ions.

I understand all that. I only said "salt" because you said "salt" -

...seen the opaque salt water flowing from the barrel...half a cup of mortons in there.