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rmocarsky
June 7, 2009, 06:46 PM
Hello hunters,

I realize this is not about firearms but I have to relay this unbelievable happening.

My 32 year old nephew is an AVID deer hunter, gun and bow.

He lives pretty far away from me and I only see him a few times a year, and when I do, we report to each other how our deer season went.

Wow . . .

He showed me pics.

He was bowhunting early Oct., 2008. Had 3 arrows. This guy hunts from dawn to dusk.

He has 3 arrows.


In the morning from his treestand, he saw a nice 6 pt buck, grunted him in but he wouldn't come super close. About 30 yards.

He lets loose an arrow. Miss.

Now two arrows. The whole day passes. HOLY MACKERAL! Here comes what looks to be the same 6 pointer as light is fading fast.

First arrow, down he goes. Spine shot. Rear legs useless. trying to crawl away. With his last arrow my newphew tries to finish the buck. Just as he releases, the buck thrashes, and arrow deflects off his rack.

NO MORE ARROWS!

And a still very much alive, albeit crippled 6 point buck.

Nephew climbs down from treestand, using his flash light, finds a young sapling tree, hacks it down with his knife.

Whittles a point . . . get the picture? I do not think I could have done this myself.

He finished the buck by shoving the "spear" up under its rib cage as deep as he could. Said death was just about instant.

True story. He kept the "spear" and will always keep it as a souvenir.


Rmocarsky

hogdogs
June 7, 2009, 06:59 PM
I came a cross a buck that had been carhit and crawled 700-1000 yards (maybe more) and was near starvation and dehydrated. I did the Noble Deed and "stuck" it with my folding buck knife I used on hogs. Glad the guy got the job done.
Brent

FrontSight
June 8, 2009, 10:57 AM
i think that was a pretty humane act, albeit a heartwrenching one to commit!

Doyle
June 8, 2009, 11:39 AM
Out of the two arrows that missed, I would think he would be able to recover at least one of them. I think I shot 8 or 9 times last season and only failed to recover 2 or 3 of the arrows.

davlandrum
June 8, 2009, 01:15 PM
Good job in a bad situation,

but, seriously, only 3 arrows - why?:confused:

hogdogs
June 8, 2009, 01:59 PM
For deer hunting, I load the gun of choice, no spare ammo for me... 5 in the mossbergs and 6 in the marlin:D That is for the deer, hogs and any yotes I see...
Brent

Doyle
June 8, 2009, 02:12 PM
but, seriously, only 3 arrows - why?

I only carry 4 when I go. That's all my quiver holds and I don't want to lug around a 2nd quiver.

Gbro
June 8, 2009, 02:23 PM
Similar event happened to me when I shot my very 1st deer with a rifle. i was shaking so bad I couldn't hit it a 2nd time to finish it off.
It was a terrible conclusion to what was suppose to be a super great event.
The stress of the incident made for strong tasting venison (that was told to me then by the experienced hunters).

davlandrum
June 8, 2009, 02:36 PM
That's all my quiver holds

Seems to be the trend in quivers - smaller is better. Not sure if it is being driven by tree-stand hunters or what.

For still-hunting, I like at least an 8-arrow quiver. That lets me take 2-3 "bad" arrows with blunts or field points for popping a stump occasionally, or a grouse or rabbit for the pot, and still have "enough" tuned arrows with broadheads to hunt with.

I guess "enough" is enough, until it isn't.

Brian Pfleuger
June 8, 2009, 07:39 PM
Been there, done that.... twice.


Once, had to climb down and pull the arrow out of the deer and re-shoot it.:barf: Point blank shooting a deer with a bow makes a TERRIBLE noise.

Once, had to cut an arrow out of a tree and shoot the deer.

Both times were terrible, weird, fluke-type incidents, not indicative of my hunting style or skill, I can assure you.

Jack O'Conner
June 9, 2009, 07:12 AM
Years ago, my brother and I finished off a car-struck buck caveman style. With bowling ball sized rocks. No offense intended to Cave Men.

Jack

Jekyll
June 9, 2009, 11:19 AM
Many years ago my son shot and wounded a doe at dusk with his rifle. We were hunting on a county line in a gun county while the next county was bow only.

We tracked the deer accros the county line and to within 50 yards of a house so no coup de gras shot was possible. We got to the deer and kept our flashlight in its eyes to blind it while I approached with my knife. I stradled the deer and stabbed it only to discover how dense the hair is. I don't know today whether I got the knife into it or not. The doe bucked me off and we never saw it again as it dissapeared into the night.

I learned many lessons from that experience.

Kreyzhorse
June 9, 2009, 02:50 PM
Once, had to climb down and pull the arrow out of the deer and re-shoot it. Point blank shooting a deer with a bow makes a TERRIBLE noise.

Once, had to cut an arrow out of a tree and shoot the deer.

Both times were terrible, weird, fluke-type incidents, not indicative of my hunting style or skill, I can assure you.

Stories like this are, in my opinion, what define real hunters. It's easy to shoot a deer, but it's hard to finish them in a situation like this one. No matter how good of hunters we are, bad things happen. Righting the situation, no matter how hard, is what defines a good hunter to me.

I've never had to do it with bow, but I've had / seen some with a rifle that were terrible. Had to be done though, the deer / antelope deserved it out of respect and we as hunters owed to ourselves and each other.

Gbro
June 12, 2009, 10:47 AM
Jekyll posted,
I stradled the deer and stabbed it only to discover how dense the hair is. I don't know today whether I got the knife into it or not. The doe bucked me off and we never saw it again as it dissapeared into the night.

I can truly understand your situation. I broke the back on the one I had to finish with my knife.
There is nothing enjoyable about having to use a knife to finish off a wounded animal:(

Jack posted,
Years ago, my brother and I finished off a car-struck buck caveman style. With bowling ball sized rocks. No offense intended to Cave Men.
Those Gecko cavemen are a sensitive lot, are they not!

I teach young hunters to always wait for an adult before approaching a downed deer. There have been many bad outcomes.
I got kicked hard (got me on the shoulder) by a young buck, neck shot as I was removing the 1st handfull. I carried a .22 revolver from then on to add a security round into the ear. I found out latter it is not legal in MN. In those days no handgun was legal for taking big game animals. Today a .380 is legal.

One of my hunting friends Dad had a terrible experience with a large buck that came to after he set his rifle aside. He took hold of the rack to position the head for inspection and the buck started to thrash about in a circle with his glove twisted making it imposable to let go. He was able to keep a small tree between him and the neck shot deer as they went round and round. He got hold of a couple chunks of wood to try and knock it out, but that didn't work. after a good long struggle he got his glove free and the buck got up and exited with head down. The old hunter was unable to get his gun in time for another shot and 2 day of searching for the buck were unsuccessful.

Doyle
June 12, 2009, 12:38 PM
All this reminds me of a story that was in one of the hunting magazines many years ago. Seems this one guy shot a nice deer with his brand new 30-30. The deer went down and he went to the deer, placed his rifle sling over the antlers and stepped back to snap a picture. All of a sudden, the deer which was only stunned, woke up and took off with the new rifle swinging from his neck.

Uncle Billy
June 12, 2009, 06:12 PM
A fellow I know went whitetail hunting every fall. His wife always nagged him to go along but he refused every time. After putting her off for years, she finally made it a "bedroom" issue, so he relented, even though she knew absolutely zero about anything to do with hunting. He gave her one of his 12 gauge shotguns with a slug in it and sent her down a dirt trail near where his tree stand was. He knew there would be nothing down there so he could go in the opposite direction and hunt his usual spot. On the walk there he heard shot from where he sent his wife- what could she be shooting at?? He figured he'd better see, so he set off through the woods to where she was. As he got closer he heard a man's voice say, "OK, lady, I agree. It's your deer, so put the gun down, it isn't necessary to point it at me. All I ask is that you let me get my saddle off of it".


Yeah, Okay, it's a joke, probably one that everybody has heard. I couldn't resist, sorry.

Jekyll
June 12, 2009, 10:04 PM
Gbro:

I'll admit to being VERY nervous and cautious about approahing a wounded deer. I was very aware of where my blade was. I would not have approached a buck this way. Several years later, a coworker's father was killed by a "dead" buck. He approached it, and knelt down with his knife to start field dressing the buck when the buck kicked him and drove then knife into his thigh severing his femoral artery.

banditt007
June 14, 2009, 09:44 PM
This just goes to show that when one approaches an animal they should poke it in the eye w/ the end of the barrel and make sure there is no reaction. also i've found w/ squirrels/birds/deer that they eyes almost immediately turn 'semi-gloss' instead of gloss, and look a bit dried and milky. This IMO is a sure sign the animal is dead, and not knocked out. And it seems that every animal has their eyes open when dead and not closed. just what i've observed so far..

Gbro
June 14, 2009, 11:37 PM
also i've found w/ squirrels/birds/deer that they eyes almost immediately turn 'semi-gloss' instead of gloss, and look a bit dried and milky. This IMO is a sure sign the animal is dead, and not knocked out

One needs to assess their ghoul meter in these situations. A green reading would indicate that this kind of thing upsets you. :(:(:(

That being said I have seen the luster drain out and that is a sign of DRT!

Deerhunter
December 15, 2009, 01:30 PM
I had been hunting for 18 years. Never had great spots and learned a lot on my own since my dad didn't hunt. I got out of the Army and spent the next hunting season in the woods everyday, trying to get my first buck. I was hunting a small piece of property. I was in my climbing stand and didn't have the clearance with my arrows in the quiver if I had to shoot to close to the tree. I took 2 arrows and layed them on the seat and knocked one. I bumped the arrows and one fell, now there was 2. Had a nice 8pt come up threw the guys yard and turn into the woods. I drew and grunted at him to get him to stop (he was following the doe that went through earlier). I let the arrow fly and it hit high, catching a rib and sliding up breaking his back. He was trying to get up as I knocked the next arrow. I let it fly and as I did he rolled on his side, one blade caught him and put a 4-5 inch gash in his side. Now he wanted out of there. It felt like it took forever to climb down out of the tree in my climber. Got down and got to him. I figured I would just stick him with my knife and not waste another arrow. Well I grabbed his antler and he was having none of it. I grabbed the second arrow I had shot and placed it right behind the shoulder. He weezed and was done in a second. I always carry 3 arrows into the woods, even though almost every deer I have shot only took 1.

2rugers
December 15, 2009, 01:41 PM
I have had to use the .22 pistol on more than one occasion and was glad I had thought to carry it.

A few years back I came up on the sister-in-law in a real ugly situation.

She had shot and wounded a nice buck and fired the remaining rounds from her .243, (all misses).
When I walked up I was greeted to a scene straight out of a horror show. Crazy eyed insane woman covered in blood standing over the poor deer trying to bash it's brains in with a big rock.

Thankfully, for all those involved (especially the deer, I THINK), I had my .38 snubby and mercifully administered the coup degrace.

Always carry enough ammo.

Hog Buster
December 15, 2009, 03:05 PM
Not that I doubt the veracity of the above tales, but glad I have my hip boots on.......Just in case....

hogdogs
December 15, 2009, 03:11 PM
Always carry enough ammo.
Zackly why I leave the truck with 6 rounds of .30-30 in the Marlin and 4 back ups in my pocket.
We have a 2 per day limit so I figure if 5 per deer are not enuff... I need to go back to deer killin' school.:eek:
Brent

2rugers
December 15, 2009, 03:12 PM
Slight embellishment for your entertainment,
She is only (slightly) insane.:)
But 100% true nontheless.

wpcexpert
December 15, 2009, 08:54 PM
Two cases I guess...

I was 15, and it was my 2nd year bowhunting. Now, dad and I never killed too aweful many deer. We just didn't have the land for it, but we killed atleast one a piece every year. It was mid-day(we sit all day in the treestands), and I heard him shoot. We didn't hunt but about 100yds apart at that time. I heard a good solid hit, cool. I hear a second shot, it glances thru the trees. Third shot, rock, branches, tree. And so on for 3 more shots until the quiver was empty. Now, I'm looking and straining trying to figure out what army of deer dad had run into. As I'm looking I see dad climbing down, then running. So I get down. Then one more shot. I get up to dad. And he had clipped a limb and is first arrow had hit the doe in the back near the hips. He used the rest of the remaining arrows as she was trying to crawl out of there. It was the funniest thing...later. I can still remember hearing those arrows bouncing thru the woods.

A little worse...I had a buddy hunting down from NC with me in SC. He's a decent shot and a persistent hunter. He has no sense of direction, whatsoever. Once he gets 15yds from the tree, truck, or road...lost. He also can't tell the difference between a yearling doe and a mature doe. When I use the term yearling, I'm refering to just born that year. Well, he can't judge size...at all. Notorious for shooting little ones. Well he shot one. When I got to him, he had no blood and no arrow. He showed me where it was when he shot, and said it went that way. Well, it wasn't that way, it was the complete opposite direction. It was still alive when I go to it. Just too weak to do anything. It might have weighed 40 lbs, wet. I ended up running my knife into it's chest, watching it struggle to stay alive. Now I've killed hogs with knives and spears. Killed countless other critters. But that little doe...it will never leave me.

PH/CIB
December 18, 2009, 11:35 PM
If you ever get the chance and can find one read the book, "Tigrero" by Sasha Siemel, he hunted Jaguars in the Matto Grosso of Brazil with a pack of cur hounds, the dogs would corner the Jaguar, and Siemel would walk up and induce the big cat to charge him and at the last moment he would impale them on the end of his spear with them thrashing around and trying to get down the handle of the spear to him before they died. Probably one of the greatest hunters of all time.

Although he did not use a spear, another great book is "Maneaters of Kumaon" by Jim Corbett of India. He hunted man eating Tigers and Leopards in India alone and on foot in the jungle. These cats literally had killed scores of people and some even hundreds of people, and he comes close to being killed himself on many occasions. Probably one of the bravest and greatest hunters of all time. Both these great men died I believe in the 1950's.

Art Eatman
December 19, 2009, 08:55 AM
I remember "Tigrero" from when it first came out in paperback. "Maneaters", I vaguely recall, was in our junior high school library.

Worth the read...