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View Full Version : Would you use a 9mm to hunt hogs?


gadgetguy1288
May 31, 2009, 01:27 PM
As long as its a reasonable distance.

I bought a Hi-point 995 and did a little "upgrading" (see pics in next post), and when i was hunting back in FL(before i joined the CG and moved to AK) I carried a 9mm as a backup when i was hunting, but luckily never had to use it.

What type of ammo would you use? I would think FMJ would get the best penetration but may require multiple hit, which wouldn't be exactly "ethical".

I was just thinking, and figured I'd ask here. Im going to try and get a southern station next,mainly because i want to get back to hog hunting, and try my hand at yotes. :D

Thanks for the info.

gadgetguy1288
May 31, 2009, 01:49 PM
heres a pic of my 995 as it sits curently( I'm not finished with it yet)
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u110/gadgetguy1288/vacation-newgun042-1.jpg

Daryl
May 31, 2009, 02:16 PM
Personally, I wouldn't trust a 9mm for hogs; especially large hogs.

Not that it can't kill a hog, because I'm very sure it's possible; I'd want something with a bit more punch, penetration, and some expansion.

I remember shooting a few cottontails with 9mm FMJ's back in my teen years, and there's no way I'd use them on a hog.

If you do so, I hope you'll report back and let us know how it works out for you.

After all, there's nothing like first hand experience.

Daryl

bswiv
May 31, 2009, 02:18 PM
Picture did not post...........?

That aside, I would say that under MOST situations a 9MM would not be a proper round to shoot hogs with. Sure it will kill them. And for sure it will drop them in their tracks with proper shot placement. Still it is somewhat on the light side IMHO.

I think by the way you put your question you already have that feeling........ Better to use a little more gun and not leave one wounded in the woods. Even though some would say "it's just a hog" still seems to me that it's due some sort of ethical consideration......

Besides that there is hardly better eating so why not make a little more sure that when you get the chance you put bar-b-cue on the table?

And I am not suggesting big ugly magnums, just a small upgrade. Something with a heavier bullet and a little more umph. Start with a 30-30 class round or a 44 mag and work up. They are readly available in light rifles and will do a much better job.

gadgetguy1288
May 31, 2009, 03:16 PM
sorry about the pic, I fixed it now.

and ya I hear what your saying and kinda figured the same thing, I just figured I'd ask around :D

ya if I do end up getting somewhere south(I'm hoping for Texas or Louisiana) I plan on getting something bigger for hogs (I'm thinking the New FN AR, or Kel-Tec RFB) but just figured I might have another use for my 995 besides just a range toy, haha(the boss didn't like just that use for a gun lol)

charlie-6
May 31, 2009, 03:17 PM
NO

skydiver3346
May 31, 2009, 03:27 PM
No way in my opinion!
Sorry gadgetguy, but the 9mm just doesn't have the ballistics enough to be the primary hunting gun, (even out of your High Point). It really is not fair to the animals you hunt. Sure it could kill a deer, etc. but it would have the be the most perfect of shots (or the deer could end up in bad shape for sometime before it expired, if at all). That sometimes happens even with high powered hunting with rifles (if we make a poor placement shots). Having a 9mm as a back up carry gun would be okay but I don't belive it should be your primary weapon. Good luck.

gadgetguy1288
May 31, 2009, 03:31 PM
thanks again guys, like I said, I didn't really plan on it, I just figured I'd ask and see what you guys thought about it.

hogdogs
May 31, 2009, 03:31 PM
If I didn't have a Gamo 1,000 fps pellet rifle or a .22LR, I would use a 9mm to dispatch hogs but not to hunt them. Just far too limited in usable range. I would use a 20 or 12 gauge slug as my minimum range round with range limited to 80-100 yards in my hands. I would use a .30-30 as a minimal rifle round but would much prefer a .308 or .30-06 in rifle calibers...
Brent

simonkenton
May 31, 2009, 03:49 PM
I have killed a lot of hogs, with a patched round ball with my TC Hawken, and, mostly, with a 30-06.
One day, I went hiking through the swamp, looking for hogs. I had only a 1911 Colt ACP in a holster. I was using military hardball ammo.
I saw a 140 pound boar rooting around.
I walked up until I was 30 yards away.
I tried for a lung shot and fired once.
The bullet went high and clipped the spine.
The hog dropped. His hind legs were out, he was spinning around on his front legs.
I went right up and shot him twice in the lungs, lights out.

I am sure that a 9mm would work, on smaller hogs and at close range.
I would use a round that would expand, maybe a hollow point, and go for the lung shot.

Yithian
May 31, 2009, 04:34 PM
I'm with hogdogs...
I have had the unfortunte experience of shooting a charging sow in the face with my 30-30. It stopped its charge, but ran away.
I stood there dumbfounded.
A wild ~200Lb sow, 10 feet in front of me, shot in the head with a 30-30, and she ran away.
For a few seconds I thought I must've missed her. Then I found the "worms" in the mesquites. It was strips of flesh, not worms.
LeveRevolution's.

Even if it was a full auto 9mm. I wouldn't rely on any appreciable penetration to stop a charger.

simonkenton
May 31, 2009, 08:28 PM
I stood there dumbfounded.
A wild ~200Lb sow, 10 feet in front of me, shot in the head with a 30-30, and she ran away.

You made a bad shot.
Hit a 200 pound hog right with a 30-30, and you will be smoking a ham tomorrow.

Much of the legend of the wild hog is built upon bad shots.

hogdogs
May 31, 2009, 08:54 PM
Simon, I agree! But the part of the legend you did not expound on is that all the "vital zone" areas are reduced in size. The "brainer" area of a hog is surrounded by what looks to be vital skull when it is really just "tissue". The torso vital zone is highly compromised if you wish to avoid the shield area. I describe it as being in a triangle created by the belly as bottom, front leg muscle as forward and equilateral for rearward line of the triangle. The heart lies nearly at the bottom of torso. If you are tennisball accurate I suggest a heart shot on a good hog with a shield. A hog just doesn't offer the same target zones as a deer... In the cage I can "brain" any hog with a pellet gun or can "bleed" any hog with a 3.75 inch Buck 110 right to the heart/lungs/arteries any time...
Unless you are a routine hog hunter and willing to admit the differences I listed, please don't advise folks on the right gun for hog huntin'...
I can post links to some very graphic yet helpful pics of the hog anatomy as it pertains to shooters. None of the vital organs are easy pickins'
Brent

GeauxTide
May 31, 2009, 09:15 PM
Sure, a 9.3x62!

fisherman66
May 31, 2009, 10:01 PM
or even the 9.3x74r:D

9mm Luger? yer gonna need stitches and new britches.

kiwi56
May 31, 2009, 10:14 PM
with a 9mm I would definitely feel under gunned. My favourite weapons for pig hunting is either of my two Rossi lever actions,one is in 357 magnum and the other is in 44 magnum. The biggest pig taken so far was a 150 pound boar and a 180 pound sow, however we do use dogs and most of the time shots are less than 3 yards. I have found that jacketed hollow points work just fine.

stinger
May 31, 2009, 10:18 PM
I believe that hunting should be ethical and kills should be as quick as possible. The 9mm gives you no margin of error. A 223 is significantly more powerful than a 9mm and that is also not ideal...not to say I haven't hunted them with it before.

Having said that, I wouldn't go looking for hogs with a 9mm, but I think if the opportunity strikes you should shoot them with whatever you have handy...even a 22lr. They are a pest and overrunning many parts of the country. The only good hog is a dead hog.

RangerHAAF
June 1, 2009, 07:05 AM
No, I wouldn't try it.

Art Eatman
June 1, 2009, 10:07 AM
First off, I'm in agreement with the naysayers. However, I have a "however". :D

I guess I'm more of a sneaky-snake than most folks when it comes to traipsing around in the boonies. I regularly find critters fairly much up close and personal before they know I'm there.

So at ten to twenty yards and a good little eating-size shoat of some 40-ish pounds, I'd be likely to use most anything bigger than a .22.

But that's not really the same thing as "hog huntin'".

hogdogs
June 1, 2009, 10:27 AM
Actually, Art, That is huntin'... gettin close. And yes I agree for them tasty little ones it don't take much punch.
Brent

simonkenton
June 1, 2009, 11:11 AM
Unless you are a routine hog hunter and willing to admit the differences I listed, please don't advise folks on the right gun for hog huntin'..

I never had any trouble making a lung shot on a hog with a rifle, and every time, the hog dropped within 50 yards.
If you don't like my advice, then don't take it, and you can keep the condescending remarks to yourself.

You are the "expert" who was saying how good the meat is on a 400 pound boar.

publius
June 1, 2009, 11:48 AM
If you are a very experienced hunter and are very familiar with the anatomy of a hog you could do it with well placed shots from a tree stand. Certainly not ut thmy choice of weapon, but then I have shot them with some weird calibers (6.5 JAP., .22LR pistol.)

hogdogs
June 1, 2009, 12:31 PM
You are the "expert" who was saying how good the meat is on a 400 pound boar.
I may have to look for that... I may have said would be edible or even said it would make sausage... I have never seen a 400 pound feral hog.
From this link...
http://www.ventanawild.org/news/se02/pigs.html
This is written...
The biggest boar we ever killed on the ranch, when hung, measured 9 ft. from tip to tip. The skin on his neck was three inches thick; eleven bullets were found which over the years had been embedded in the fat.
I have seen a broadhead embedded in the shield similar to this one...
http://www.nativeoutdoors.com/archery/images/steelforce/venom.jpg
Brent

Huntergirl
June 1, 2009, 12:49 PM
9mm, ah, no. For you lucky guys who get to go hog hunting, be humane and use enough gun, please.

Yithian
June 2, 2009, 12:20 AM
I hit the forehead of the pig that charged me, and it was looking at me. Not my legs, but me.
I literally removed flesh from face and head, and the strip remains ended up in the tree behind it.
I simply hit it at a bad angle.
I also didn't think that the 30-30 could hit at that range from a bad angle.
It had the same effect as slanted armor on a tank. Energy deflection.

We stalked up on a large sound of who knows how many. ATTT saw them first 15 yards on our left, and opened fire. All I saw was the backs of ten or twelve adults, like whale's in the ocean, scatter in all directions. Thru the tall grass, one sow found me and charged me. I waited for the shot until it got in the open onto my path. I was afraid the LeveRevolution would splinter on the grass if I shot earlier.
Boom! She screamed and turned off to my right, and ran a hundred yards before she stopped screaming. Then just kept running.

A 9mm pistol round of any size less than 357Mag or 38+P is not something I would take on a pig hunt.
The opening shot isn't the worry (a 22LR will kill an adult pig). It is the actions of any pigs afterwards that scares me.

.300 Weatherby Mag
June 2, 2009, 12:30 AM
No!! Do not use the 9mm on pigs unless you want to be featured on one of those "When Wildlife Attacks" shows.....

treg
June 2, 2009, 09:49 AM
Coming from a guy who's not yet shot a hog:

IF I had a 9mm, and someday probably will. And IF I was far enough into my hog hunting career to want to wait for a proper size hog at proper 9mm distances then - Heck ya I would!

Sounds like a cool challenge.

hogdogs
June 2, 2009, 10:27 AM
And Treg makes a valid point!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVX0y2Pcj_s
This vid requires sign in for some reason... Likely cuz the guy say "adult" airifle?
But nothin sneaky I assure you.
This is a .177 PBA (Performance Ballistic Alloy) pellet from a gamo at 1,600+/- fps on this hog. Just shows that, as Treg notes, given the right distance and circumstance in proficient hands, pert near any device is lethal and humane.
Brent

Para Bellum
June 2, 2009, 11:30 AM
Rather a 9mm than a .357 Sig or Mag
and here is why:

http://www.hopmeier.at/9mms357s.JPG

check it out yourself at:
http://www.winchester.com/lawenforcement/flash/win_flash.html

The reasons are simple. The more sectional engery the less penetration. The more sectional density (weight per area) the more penetration. Too much energy makes poor penetration in soft targets (hard targets - different story).

bcarver
June 2, 2009, 09:55 PM
That is kinda like fishing for 25 lb grouper with 4 pound line.
you could do it but there has got to be a better rig.

kyle1974
June 2, 2009, 10:58 PM
you could do it, but you need to be close... like 20-30 yards, and limit your shots to head shots.. or primarily, ear shots.

I've killed a few hogs with head shots from a .22

they're not bulletproof...:rolleyes:

I wouldn't try to shoot one with that 9mm at 75 yards in the shoulder, I would bet unless it was a little pig (30-50 lbs), you wouldn't kill it.

bubba15301
June 4, 2009, 04:58 PM
used wrong bullet in 30/30 should of used nosler partition bullet 170 gr

hogdogs
June 4, 2009, 05:14 PM
But bubba, That limits a 7 round rifle to a 2 shot...
Yithian hunts a method requiring higher capacity... Sneaking up on a herd of hogs and lettin' it rip and slinging lead at as many bodies as is possible.
Brent

Yithian
June 4, 2009, 05:32 PM
Heh. heh. Yea.
Now I use a Saiga 308.

Just keep pullin...
Killin them with 'Kindness'. LOL

SavageSniper
June 4, 2009, 06:09 PM
No they are not bullet proof, but the bigger ones can be very determained to stay alive. I shot one at 70 steps with a 30-06. First in the neck broad side and 2nd in the head. The neck shot didn't go thru. His shield was very thick. That was in the mid 80's. Still have his big ole tusk. 100 lb and under the 9mm should be ok at best at close range but you might get lucky and get in tight with a 200 lb boar and visions of a 270 will be dancing in your head.

Willie Lowman
June 4, 2009, 07:15 PM
I have never hunted hogs... We call 'em wild boars around here...

Would a 7.62x54r Romak3 with 180gr soft points be a good choice for a first time hog hunt?

Renfield
June 4, 2009, 07:19 PM
no I wouldn't use a 9mm as a back up while hunting unless I was carrying a ccw to protect myself from 2 legged predators

Yithian
June 4, 2009, 07:42 PM
I have never hunted hogs... We call 'em wild boars around here...


Technically, a wild boar is a feral pig (aka swine, or hog) that is a MALE.
A wild Sow would then be its counterpart. LOL

And yes, That 7.62x54R would do just fine, ...if you had only one to shoot at.

Just for opinions sake, the sows taste, and smell, much better.
The tiny little piglets are much more tender.

Willie Lowman
June 4, 2009, 08:03 PM
And yes, That 7.62x54R would do just fine, ...if you had only one to shoot at.A ten shot semi auto that has the same recoil as an SKS would only allow me to shoot at one? I am thinking that you don't know what a Romak3 is...

http://www.powercustom.com/AKPages/GunGalleryPics/romak3f.jpg

/\ Romak3 /\ I admit, they are kinda long compared to the leverguns most seem to prefer. Unless you were implying something that I completely missed...

Thanks for the reply on the ammo.

si vis pacem, para b
June 4, 2009, 08:47 PM
I've seen a forty cal. bounce off a piggy's head like a bouncy ball so I definitely would not depend on a 9mm to protect me from a feral hog

shooter007
June 5, 2009, 03:50 AM
NOOOOO! Do not use a 9...simple.

sc928porsche
June 5, 2009, 01:55 PM
Hunt.....NO! Self defense.....it thats all that I had, but I dont carry a 9. I carry a Superblackhawk in the field.

p2269x19
February 5, 2010, 04:07 AM
If need be, I'll use whatever's available. I can accurately dump 18 rounds from my P226 in around 6-7 seconds at 20 yards. However, if a handgun was the only option I would prefer my S&W 1006 stoked with 200gr FMJ. Two holes=more blood loss.

Daryl
February 5, 2010, 06:32 AM
No, I wouldn't.

Daryl

Double Naught Spy
February 5, 2010, 09:17 AM
I see 9mm as being less than ideal for most adult hogs, but great for piglets. As noted, it won't be great for the job unless it is going to be a short distance shot and very accurate, at least if you want a reasonable humane kill.

I have never hunted hogs... We call 'em wild boars around here...

Is that like using the word "cow" to refer to cattle regardless of whether they are a cow or bull?

youp
February 5, 2010, 09:34 AM
Sure, do it. Have a blast. You sneak up on them and gently place the muzzle against his ear. Be sure to direct your line of fire down the ear canal. It absolutely MUST direct the slug down his ear canal. You may not get too many shots, but your hunting skills will benefit greatly.

Many guys get hogs with a knife. I have been hog hunting a few times and we never killed any. Just caught them, cut the boars, and trimmed the tail. My hosts played 'give the Yankee a shoat and have him carry it out'. Fun game. Be sure to keep a hand clamped on the little guys snout.

Hog Hunter
February 5, 2010, 09:56 AM
I personally carry a G17 in 9mm as my backup and sometimes as primary, if the misses is with me. I hunt in middel georgia and have had plenty of experiances with hogs and hunting them.
I love the 9mm for hog hunting or just backup. about a month ago me and my gf were sitting on the ground watching a plot. She had my 7mag and all i had was my glock. A pack of 15-18 walked out into the plot, we waited till they got a lil ways into the feild befor i leet her shoot. BANG!!! she missed!! I picked the biggest one out of the bunch as they were running at about 40-45 yards back in the woods. droped him in his tracks. when he squiled the rest of them stoped. pick the biggest and shoot, he ran off. picked another and shot, it droped right there. Then i just picked the spot where they was running inthe woods at and let them have it. I ended up with 5 dead hogs and shot nine times. the biggest would probally tip the scales at close to 300, smallest maybe 100 lbs. none of them went furthere than 100 yards. i was shooting a federal hollow point in +P. Maybe that was just my day to be shooting them, but it damn sure made me belive in the 9 for hogs.

2rugers
February 5, 2010, 11:17 AM
..........

dromaeosaur
February 5, 2010, 05:03 PM
Not a 9mm pistol, though that would be a good sidearm for hogs i guess. I'd use the carbine because its easier to aim with. Gotta get good hits on those hogs no matter what caliber. I'd rather use a 10/22 than any pistol, for good hits.

Hog Buster
February 5, 2010, 07:29 PM
Here we go again. Because of the fabled capability of wild/feral hogs they can only be killed with a silver bullet fired from a .50 cal or larger crew served weapon. Not true. Hogs are, at best, just slightly harder to kill than deer. They're not bullet proof, bullets don't bounce off regardless of the caliber. Like most other wild animals they would rather flee than attack, unless wounded and /or cornered, or protecting shoats. Even when a wild/feral sow has little ones she’s more likely to run than fight.

As an addendum here, a domestic sow in a pen with shoats may try to eat you up if you mess with her brood, but then she’s lost her fear of humans. Plus, has nowhere to run.

Will a 9MM kill a hog? Yeah, deader than a rock, providing that the hog is hit in a vital spot at a reasonable distance. Not only will a 9MM kill a hog, anything from a .22 to a 12 gauge will too. How do I know? In 70 odd years I’ve killed more than a few wild/feral hogs. You just have to shoot ‘em in the right spot.

Here's a picture of one taken last year with a 9MM pistol. Head shot.

Hog Buster
February 5, 2010, 07:34 PM
Well, I'll try again.....

OK, it didn't work......make believe you saw the picture........

See it here:
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=53207&d=1256880721

2rugers
February 5, 2010, 07:38 PM
I see the picture and that's some good shooting Hog Buster.:D

hogdogs
February 5, 2010, 07:45 PM
HB, Feral hogs with no interaction with humans will try to run you down and muck up your day! TEE-RUST MEEE!!! Been there done that far too many times to give them any leeway.

No piglets need be involved... I have had hogs come back that were run off by the dogs approach... Soon as they heard the one bayed up squealing when the catch dog got to it... BAM!!! They come back to help their buddy out of a jam... Far too many dogs with layed open hamstrings to convince me they are so fearful.

As for vitals... the area that a 9mm could penetrate on a fully sheilded boar is very small. Shoulder? NOPE!!! The bullet will penetrate maybe 1/2 inch of the 2-3 inch thick shoulder shield.
Found too many bullets and buck pellets as well as a few broadheads that failed to enter the torso to buy into the "easy as deer" game.

Head shots are easy to understand as tuff to make once you skin a few skulls and realize how small the brain pocket is compared to overall skull size.
Brent

robhof
February 5, 2010, 08:12 PM
The Warthogs; A-10 tank killers used to kill wild hogs with their 30mm out at the Clayborne range near Alex, La. in the early 80's. The pigs liked to feed near the target sails. We figured they were going for the pigs, because their hit scores dropped when pigs were present. Never saw any hits run away, all bang flops or bang bang poof. Was a popular place for buzzards too.

dromaeosaur
February 5, 2010, 08:18 PM
rofl. You hear a buuuuuuuuuuurp and then you can smell some bbq

Hog Buster
February 5, 2010, 08:53 PM
Hogdogs

I don't doubt you, but I don't hunt with dogs and think that may add to the confusion of hog hunting. In the tumble of dogs and hogs you could just as easily be dog bit as hog bit.

I haven't experienced any attacks over the years. My shots are almost always head or spine shots. That doesn't leave much room for wounding them and have them thrashing around and squealing before they die. There's no doubt that a squealing hog will attract other hogs, but after seeing that a human was around they have always headed for the hills in my case.

I've found a few with birdshot or buckshot in 'em, but there's no telling the distance they were shot at. With some of the nimrods that are in the woods today God only knows what you might find stuck in game.

Shot placement is the key. If you shoot one in the ass you've created a problem. Hence the statement about hitting them in the right spot. Most times I still hunt them with my deer rifles, but have killed my share with various pistols. Including a couple of quick lung shots with a 9MM on occasion. They took off and bled out, but the 9MM did them in.

Still hogs are not rhinos and I find killing them just about as easy as deer.

As an after thought: Last fall I got 37, this fall only 22, maybe I'm making a dent?

hogdogs
February 5, 2010, 09:04 PM
Well if you want to see the dogs on hogs, I have at least 2 productive doggers in the southern half of La. might could show you a run.

Bite wounds from dogs compared to wounds from hogs are easy to discern. i have been chomped a time or several by the hogs but I always watched the sumbuck latch on.:eek:

Brent

Atroxus
February 5, 2010, 11:13 PM
I saw a tv show where iirc the hosts were shooting hogs with a beretta CX4 Storm. I would think that coming from a 16.6 inch barrel a 9mm would have plenty of accuracy and velocity to take down a hog within reasonable ranges. Granted I don't have any specific numbers to back that up, but doesn't longer barrel generally=higher velocity and better accuracy?

2rugers
February 6, 2010, 11:27 AM
Like HogDogs said, a 9mm will not even penetrate the shield of a heavy boar.

The cartilage that grows there has the consistency of tire rubber and can be over 3"s thick.

Daryl
February 6, 2010, 12:32 PM
Here we go again. Because of the fabled capability of wild/feral hogs they can only be killed with a silver bullet fired from a .50 cal or larger crew served weapon. Not true. Hogs are, at best, just slightly harder to kill than deer.

Ok, I can agree with that to some extent.

But to reinforce what I said before, I wouldn't use a 9mm for hunting deer, either.

The question was, "Would I use a 9mm to hunt hogs?"

No, I would not. I have far better options for the task.

But that doesn't mean that others shouldn't try it for themselves. By all means, if someone feels froggy...

Daryl

Atroxus
February 6, 2010, 01:46 PM
Here is an interesting link I found on hog anatomy and shot placement.

***WARNING*** It does have graphic photos of a "pig autopsy".

http://www.texasboars.com/anatomy.html

wyobohunter
February 9, 2010, 09:38 AM
The 35 remington is a tad over 9mm (9.0932 to be exact) but I think it'd be fine;) Couldn't resist.

doesn't longer barrel generally=higher velocity and better accuracy?

Higher velocity, yes. Better accuracy, depends. You'll have a longer sight radius for open sights but a lengthy bbl can actually be detrimental to accuracy because it'll tend to be more "whippy".

Art Eatman
February 9, 2010, 11:14 AM
"...a lengthy bbl can actually be detrimental to accuracy because it'll tend to be more "whippy".

In the context of Gale McMillan benchrest competition, I might--maybe--not respond. Trouble is, I've been getting sub-MOA accuracy out of 24" and 26" barrels for some sixty years, come July. And that includes shooting on my 500-yard range.

There's no way on God's green earth that a 9mm will see any degradation in group size in going from a pistol-length barrel to a carbine-length barrel.

And I was having a pretty good morning, before reading that...

Cremon
February 9, 2010, 11:26 AM
I would NOT use a 9mm to hunt hogs. I carried a 9mm semi auto pistol 20+ years ago as a backup gun when I went hunting pigs and used a 12 gauge with 0-0-0 buckshot as my primary hunting weapon. I remember hitting a boar with the buckshot at about 30 yards and it ROYALLY teed him off. The thing shivered with the impact and started to bleed profusely from its wounds. It then charged me at full speed and forced me up a tree. I dropped my shotgun to climb and it took several shots from that 9mm to finally kill that beast.

Now I haven't hunted hogs in years now but I would use my 30-06 or 300 magnum if I were to want to do that again today (I stopped because field dressing and transporting deer is much less stinky and messy than messing with feral pigs).

Deer are one thing but a boar? You can go from hunter to quarry in an instant as I did 20 years back and I was lucky that tree with big low branches was close by. A boar will tear you up! Shot placement is king but I would NOT want a 9mm to be my sole means of dispatching one of those things.

No way!!

jimbob86
February 9, 2010, 11:41 AM
But bubba, That limits a 7 round rifle to a 2 shot...


How so? I have a box of Nosler Partition .30 cal 170 gr. round nosed bullets (part #16333). Those would work just fine in a lever gun.

2rugers
February 9, 2010, 12:25 PM
I know I have posted this somewhere before but for those who have not seen, this is what the shield looks like on 300 lb. plus boars. It has the consistency of heavy tire rubber.
One slab of this shield, (from the neck back to the last rib, top of spine to the elbow weighed 75 lbs.)
So the shield cut away from both sides of the hog would weigh 150 lbs!

My wife killed this hog over dogs with a knife (not the one pictured).

The knife pictured has a blade 3 1/4"s long.

For giggles I layed this shield down flat on the ground and shot it point blank with a 2" .38 loaded with 110 gr. jacketed hollows and 130 gr. fmj.

110 gr. only went 1 1/2"'s into one slab. The fmj. went through all 3"s of the first slab and about 1/2" of the second. Tough Stuff.

If you are going to use a pistol you had better choose a caliber with enough energy to penetrate, (at range), and a good bullet up to the task of plowing through this ARMOR.

Minimum I would choose at handgun velocities would be a .357 loaded with hardcast 180's.

Under 100 lbs. 9mm would not be a problem out to 50 yds. or so if you do your part.

wyobohunter
February 9, 2010, 07:01 PM
In the context of Gale McMillan benchrest competition, I might--maybe--not respond. Trouble is, I've been getting sub-MOA accuracy out of 24" and 26" barrels for some sixty years, come July. And that includes shooting on my 500-yard range.

There's no way on God's green earth that a 9mm will see any degradation in group size in going from a pistol-length barrel to a carbine-length barrel.

And I was having a pretty good morning, before reading that...


Notice in the question I answered he asked doesn't longer barrel generally=higher velocity and better accuracy?

I think you are taking my statement out of context because I was responding to a generalized assumption (longer bbl=better accuracy) or I didn't make myself clear. At least one study has shown that... All else bieng equal, a shorter (more stiff) bbl will tend to have a smaller resonation pattern (if I'm wording that correctly) resulting in tighter groups. That doesn't take into account the two distinct advantages of a longer bbl, 1: longer sight radius and 2: higher velocity, both contribute to reducing shooter aim point error on shots taken from field positions at estimated ranges. I did not suggest that a longish bbl can not be accurate. My 26" bbl .338 RUM is plenty accurate. It has a fairly thin bbl, it may gain some consistency if I were to lop off a few inches; sight radius isn't a factor because the rifle is scoped but the loss in velocity wouldn't be worth it to me.

K8vf
February 9, 2010, 09:44 PM
How about a 9mm like a high point carbine for coyotes to 50 yrds?

themusgrat
February 9, 2010, 10:39 PM
I know this has been answered to death, but I've shot a 300 lbs sow with a 300 winmag at 100 yards, using a Hornady 165gn BTSP, and it barely penetrated. She ran about 30 yards before giving up, and once I got a look at it, there was hardly any blood, so I'm pretty much just lucky that the bullet penetrated and hit a vital organ. There was no exit. A few inches in any direction and she would have run off. This was in a pack of about 20 hogs, so if they had seen me and charged, that could have been bad. Do I carry a .45 when I look for hogs? Yes. But if I ever end up having to use it, I might just be dead.

jgcoastie
February 10, 2010, 10:37 AM
I don't have nearly the hog hunting experience that Brent brings to the table, but I've been charged by a couple boars...

The most memorable was when I was 16, hunting with a buddy. I figured it would be a good idea to bring along my old man's Glock 17 for "just in case"... Shoulda grabbed something bigger.

We were tracking a boar and we suddenly became the hunted. I was standing in the middle of a trail with nowhere to go when that dang thing charged. I drew, took aim, and started lettin loose. Shortly after that bas***d split my leg into three pieces, my buddy finally got around to putting a 12ga slug into it.

9mm is not enough.

When there is the distinct possibility of being injured, why limit yourself.

I carried a 10mm from then on out. I still carry a 10mm today in fact....

Art Eatman
February 10, 2010, 02:19 PM
Sorta back to the ancient deal of killing vs. stopping. :) Most anything will kill any critter--eventually. What's more important is the Gitter Done before the problem gets up close and personal.

I don't know about y'all, but hitting a walking or running target with a rifle seems a bunch easier than it is with a handgun...

Fat White Boy
February 10, 2010, 10:04 PM
My son tried to coup a 130 pound hog with a 9mm... As soon as he shot it, It jumped to its feet. I was laughing too hard to use my .357 mag on it....

barnetmill
February 21, 2010, 05:02 PM
2rugers
Senior Member

Join Date: August 21, 2005
Location: texas
Posts: 668

I know I have posted this somewhere before but for those who have not seen, this is what the shield looks like on 300 lb. plus boars. It has the consistency of heavy tire rubber.
One slab of this shield, (from the neck back to the last rib, top of spine to the elbow weighed 75 lbs.)
So the shield cut away from both sides of the hog would weigh 150 lbs!
.......
For giggles I layed this shield down flat on the ground and shot it point blank with a 2" .38 loaded with 110 gr. jacketed hollows and 130 gr. fmj.

110 gr. only went 1 1/2"'s into one slab. The fmj. went through all 3"s of the first slab and about 1/2" of the second. Tough Stuf
I agree that the 9 mm is not the best caliber for hog hunting, but in all fairness a 9mm nato fmj will out penetrate most other pistol calibers in yellow pine such as the .38 spl., .45 ACP fmj and 44 mag mid range loads. So comparing a 9mm luger round to a .38 spl is not a good comparison. If the 9 was fire straight on so it did not glance off there is a very good chance it would penetrate to do some damage. It is just that the hole is very small and compared to a center fire rifle the energy is very low.

2rugers
February 21, 2010, 06:51 PM
I am curious Barnet.
How much further does the 9mm 115 gr. fmj. penetrate ballistic gell when compared to the .38 130 gr. fmj?

My test was done at point blank range with a 2" Taurus snubbie.
By point blank I mean I held the muzzle less than a foot from the shield.

Once you get into the field and stretch the range 25 to 30 yds. that 9mm will act just like the .38 did point blank.

Add in some dried and caked mud and the 9mm will fail too often to make it a viable hog hunting round.

Yes, you can use it behind dogs with a good degree of success, and yes you can easily use it for dispatching hogs in traps, but to tote it as a viable round for hunting is way off the mark.

As further evidence of this whole 9mm vs. hogs http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185104&highlight=the+great+tfl+pistol+hog

waterfowler
February 21, 2010, 07:04 PM
If they are causing disruption id say shoot it with anything you can get your hands on.

barnetmill
February 22, 2010, 01:22 PM
2rugers
Senior Member I am curious Barnet.
How much further does the 9mm 115 gr. fmj. penetrate ballistic gell when compared to the .38 130 gr. fm

I agree that 9 mm is not the choice for hunting hogs on foot alone. I do think that a 9mm if fired perpendicular to a hog's body will penetrate past the cape, but I am not sure how far. I also admit I have not done it or want to do it.
To be honest I have no idea how far a 9mm will penetrate ballistic gel, but your shoulder cape is not ballistic gell and is much tougher. I suspect that your ammo for .38 spl would get at best 800 fps from a 4-6 inch barrel. A standard 9mm luger with the 115 from a pistol will be closer to 1100 fps. It is simply a difference in velocity that counts here combined with a strongly constructed bullet. Not all 9mm fmj bullets are equal and a penetration test with winchester white box showed the slug deforming. The only way to settle the question is to get another thick hog cape and shoot it again with a 38, 9 mm, 40, 45, .357, and 44.
At 25-30 yards the 9 mm will lose velocity and I am not sure how much. But my experiment was done with a handgun and if one uses a carbine you should still have pistol muzzle velocities at 30 yards range. Even buckshot is still deadly at 30 yards.

2damnold4this
February 24, 2010, 05:35 PM
Supposedly, a 9mm 124 grain NATO round penetrates a little over 27 inches in ballistic gel.

themusgrat
February 25, 2010, 01:18 AM
I know the skin on a 200 lbs hog is 40 lbs of that weight, so take that into consideration when you're trying to shoot a 400 lbs charging boar with a pistol.

markj
February 25, 2010, 05:54 PM
a charging sow

When I was in my teens I worked at the Pig Palace here in Omaha. Stock yards. Had many a boar run at us with evil in their eyes. One day I swung a sledgehammer at ones head killing it. Boss made me pay for it tho. Hit em right they die fast. I dont recommend hunting with a sledgehammer, but a gun that hits like one will do the trick.

cubesmoothie
February 25, 2010, 09:05 PM
no ive got a saiga for hogs why would i want to use a 9mm? If it was all i had and i lived in hog country hell yeah i'd shoot them in the face with the 9. They'd be dead.

cwb
February 28, 2010, 10:41 PM
i would not use a 9mm on a hog, i use a .40
http://i579.photobucket.com/albums/ss231/gsxrpartsboy/hog.jpg