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View Full Version : Inch pound torque wrench.


mrmuffy
May 25, 2009, 03:22 PM
Does anyone know of a reasonably priced adjustable inch pound torque wrench well suited for scope installation?

I've heard some bad things about the Wheeler torque wrench screwdriver.
Any hands on experience with it?

lunchbox
May 25, 2009, 05:05 PM
go to sears

Swampghost
May 25, 2009, 05:23 PM
I think that mine came from a NAPA store. It's a beam type from decades ago.

kmullins
May 25, 2009, 10:52 PM
I'm looking for the same thing.

I avoided the Wheeler because some of the reviews I read. And my local Sears or Harbor Freight did not carry them (as they are "somewhat of a rarity and a specialty item"; true). Look for a used Utica on eBay was the advice I was given by a friend of mine here on TFL.

impalacustom
May 26, 2009, 01:57 AM
Grab a Snap-On and never look back.

sholling
May 26, 2009, 11:18 AM
I use a Utica TS35 0-36in-lb torque driver. You can pick up one used on ebay for $35-50.

TEDDY
May 27, 2009, 03:25 PM
my friend used to make very good ones.In wrentham Mass.but he died and the attleboro co closed.I have one its inch pounds.forgot exactly I have a whole box of handles.I use them for file handles.:rolleyes::eek::D

Adventurer 2
May 27, 2009, 03:34 PM
I use the Wheeler. Reading the instructions is important -
to find out where the reading is
to know to set it back to nothing when finished

One thing I don't like about it is that you have to put a bit holder (comes with it) onto the end in order to put in the bits. I have misplaced that bit holder a few times before drilling out my own storage holder for the pieces.

mrmuffy
May 27, 2009, 10:19 PM
Thanks for the input.

I found a few on EBAY.
The TS 30 has a range of 6-30 inch lbs.
The TS 35 is 6-36.
I remember reading the Wheeler info and theirs ranged all the way up to 60 lbs.
Is there any real use for 60 lbs of torque?
How about a reality check from those of you that know?
What should mounts and rings each be torqued at?
What would be a good range for other gunsmithing uses?

w748
May 27, 2009, 10:55 PM
I have the Wheeler, wish I'd put the money twords a better one. The bits are soft ; I twisted the splines on a torx bit with the setting on #25!!!! Another bit I had around worked fine.
Might be OK for scope bases and such but I definatly don't trust the repeatability for action screws.

Swampghost
May 27, 2009, 11:07 PM
Only a beam type should be used for in./ft. Buy the wrench first then figure out the drivers.

Most driver bits from a good source are a safe bet. I have them from Craftsman, Snap-On, Matco and some are 40 yrs. old. Just avoid the cheapo's. As usual, you get what you pay for.

Shane Tuttle
May 27, 2009, 11:39 PM
Grab a Snap-On and never look back.

Only the fact that Snap-On ISN'T reasonably priced.

If you're looking for a torque screwdriver but don't want to break the bank, I haven't had much luck with any of the cheaper ones out there. The next step up would be the one MAC Tools sells. IIRC, they're about $130 or so. If that's still too steep, the Utica Sholling suggested is decent. Thing is, when you're getting down to merely a few inch-pounds, sensitivity and precision causes the pucker factor to go up a bit. There's just not a lot of room for tolerances when you're torquing at this level.

sholling
May 28, 2009, 12:32 AM
Utica TS 35 Micro-Adjustable Torque Screwdriver
Thanks for the input.

I found a few on EBAY.
The TS 30 has a range of 6-30 inch lbs.
The TS 35 is 6-36.
I remember reading the Wheeler info and theirs ranged all the way up to 60 lbs.
Is there any real use for 60 lbs of torque?
How about a reality check from those of you that know?
What should mounts and rings each be torqued at?
What would be a good range for other gunsmithing uses?

I have a Wheeler but it felt cheap and I don't trust its accuracy. That's why I bought a TS35 after much praise on rimfire central. There are some seriously fanatical folks over there.

Unless the instructions say otherwise I generally torque bases to 25in-lb using blue Loctite, and the caps to 15in-lbs (no Loctite on caps). Of course I lap rings so there is no need to clamp the snot out of them to get a good grip on the scope. FWIW in theory a 6-32 screw will handle 65in-lb but I haven't had anything come loose yet.

There are some high-end high-buck "tactical" rings that are said to need 65in-lbs to clamp them down to a Picatinny rail but I've never used anything that required more than 35in-lbs. But just in case I ever get to feeling "tactical" I picked up a used TS100 and just keep it in a drawer.

Thing is, when you're getting down to merely a few inch-pounds, sensitivity and precision causes the pucker factor to go up a bit. There's just not a lot of room for tolerances when you're torquing at this level.
That's why I use a TS35 for sub-35in-lb work instead of a TS100. The Utica TS series is certified when new for +/- 3% accuracy to some mil-spec or another. I'd just about bet that tops Snap-On. That's plenty close enough for anything I'm likely to need. Of course how close the used ones are is anybody's guess. The caveat is that you need to back them off to zero when not in use.

edoubledeezy
June 14, 2009, 02:10 PM
You could go with either a torque wrench or a torque screwdriver. I always prefer adjustable torque screwdrivers for those kinds of jobs. These guys have a pretty large selection on Torque Screwdrivers and Torque Wrenches.

Check out http://www.flexibleassembly.com/Products/Torque-Screwdriver