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Para Bellum
May 21, 2009, 10:39 AM
Federal now makes HE (High Energy) Cartdrigs that push 4.121 Joule / 3.040 ft/# out of a .308 with a 24" barrel.

If you were to buy a new hunting rifle for boar and deer, would you go for a .308 or a .30-06?

riggins_83
May 21, 2009, 10:49 AM
30-06. While 308 is a similar cartridge 30-06 has a bit more power and is a classic American hunting round!

Para Bellum
May 21, 2009, 10:54 AM
yep, but that little more power is equaled with the HE Loads. And a.308 has less recoil...

Wild Bill Bucks
May 21, 2009, 11:13 AM
I was faced with the same decision about the two calibers a while back. After doing quite a bit of research, I noticed that the two calibers are almost identical out to around 300 yards. After that, the 06 has a little advantage, but since the longest shot here in southeastern Oklahoma, where I hunt is around 250 yards max. I decided to go with the .308 because of the difference in weight, and recoil.
I have harvested lots of deer and hogs with it since, and the farthest shot I have taken was a little over 150 yards.

globemaster3
May 21, 2009, 11:17 AM
Neither. I wouldn't buy a rifle based on the performance of 1 new load offering.

Ballistically, they are almost identical: within ~150 fps on similar loadings, close on ft lbs, etc.

And the comment on recoil for the .308: Newtonian Physics. If you push the bullet harder, you are going to get pushed harder. Sorry, that's the way it works.

Para Bellum
May 21, 2009, 11:39 AM
I hunt is around 250 yards max.
Same here, no shot further than 150m (165yds).

GeauxTide
May 21, 2009, 11:50 AM
Own both. Like both. Up to 150s, 308 gets the nod.

pilothunter
May 21, 2009, 11:58 AM
Neither, I'd opt for a .338 Fed:

.338 Fed 180gr@ muzzle: 2830 FPS // 3201 FPE

.338 Fed 210gr@ muzzle: 2630 FPS // 3225 FPE

30/06 180gr@ muzzle: 2700 FPS // 2913 FPE

30/06 220gr@ muzzle: 2410 FPS // 2837 FPE

Use whatever .308 you want to compare.

Para Bellum
May 21, 2009, 12:43 PM
or a .50 BMG, but that's illegal here.

FALPhil
May 21, 2009, 01:13 PM
Ballistically, they are almost identical: within ~150 fps on similar loadings, close on ft lbs, etc.


Unless you handload with Reloder 17.

freakshow10mm
May 21, 2009, 01:22 PM
Inside 300y their differences are moot. The animal won't be able to tell the difference either.

And explain to me what significance muzzle energy has to do with hunting animals that are never shot at muzzle contact?

pilothunter
May 21, 2009, 01:48 PM
How's this?

.338 Fed 210gr @ 300yds: 1880 FPE
.338 Fed 180gr @ 300yds: 1820 FPE

30/06 220gr @ 300yds: 1301 FPE
30/06 180gr @ 300yds: 1666 FPE ** all numbers taken from the 2007 edition of the Gun Digest

That better for comparison??

a7mmnut
May 21, 2009, 02:10 PM
It all depends on rifle choice. A shorter, lighter rifle can be had in the .308, and it makes for a darn handy woods carbine. The .30-06 comes in many platforms, and will be knocking on the door of the .300 mags. with Hornady Light Magnums--very versatile. I've owned both and always loved both. Wives tales of accuracy fables are just that. Either one can touch holes with a good load. Solve your delimma and get both!;)

-7-

Kreyzhorse
May 21, 2009, 02:47 PM
You can't go wrong really with either round. The .308 has a little less recoil and a little less performance and operates with a shorter bolt throw.

Real world, the deer or the boar won't know any difference. Pick one you like and go with it.

RedneckFur
May 21, 2009, 02:50 PM
The .338 Fed is just another solution in search of a non exsistant problem.

The others are right. Out to 300 yards, most animals wont be able to tell the difference when you shoot them. But the 308 gives you a short action rifle and less felt recoil.

I've hunted with both, and both are great cartriges, but I prefer the .308.

pilothunter
May 21, 2009, 03:31 PM
Well, I do appreciate your expert advice, but I've hunted with all three and do beg to differ. But that's OK as there's plenty of calibers for everyone to have a favorite, even if it's one you don't like or know about:D

freakshow10mm
May 21, 2009, 04:44 PM
So then my .375 H&H Magnum whose 300gr SP has 2720 fpe at 300 yards is far superior to the .338 Federal aka .338-08. Good.:rolleyes:

banditt007
May 21, 2009, 04:46 PM
I was choosing between the .308 and 30-06 myself not too long ago. ballistically for all intents and purposes they are the same. 30-06 always has a slight velocity edge and can handle larger bullets. the surplus ammo for the 30-06 is fading out and the .308 is a current military round and you are able to find cheap ammo (russian/surplus) much much easier.

I went with the 30-06 b/c of its history, and i like the look of it! (since they seem like 6 of one and 1/2 dozen of the other to me) And remember you can use a high energy loading in the .308...... but you can do the same thing w/ the 30-06 so the 30-06 out paces it again. IMO flip a coin. i'd look more into if your friends have the same caliber, if cheap surplus/russian steel cased stuff is a priority for it, if you want a long or short action rifle ect. If you are going to go hunting for things on the upper end of the spectrum like elk/moose/bear i'd go with the 30-06. if its going to be a regular gun for deer/black bear either would be good. If you are looking for factory bullets with target bullets i'd lean toward the .308.

Either way you cannot go wrong. and like others said, and i'd agree when a deer gets hit with one its not going to notice any difference and i dont think you are going to see any difference in meat damage between either given the same bullets/distance ect.

pilothunter
May 21, 2009, 07:39 PM
Mr Freakshow10mm, If your .375 had no more recoil (you do do know what that is?) than the .308, 30/06, or .338, than I'd agree. But I doubt ANYONE here would agree with that. The fact that the .338 Fed does what it does, with NO MORE recoil than the 30/06 (which was alluded to in the initial posting!!) makes it a different animal, well in my opinion, anyway. OOOPPS, silly me:eek:
When someone asks about a specific caliber/recoil level, I choose to remain in the [U]EXACTLY/U] the same range. Simply my opinion, of course And perhaps you might look into those facts.

crowbeaner
May 21, 2009, 09:32 PM
I shoot the '06 myself. With RL 15 powder and a 150 grain bullet, Hodgdon shows the old soldier outruns the new kid by up to 150 fps. I shoot the Sierra 150 Prohunter over 48.0 of WW 748 which yields 2810 fps. There isn't a nickels worth of difference until you start shooting 180s and up; I still like the '06 and 2700+ with IMR 4064 and a Remington CoreLokt for deer and bear here in Klintonia.

elkman06
May 21, 2009, 10:07 PM
yep, but that little more power is equaled with the HE Loads. And a.308 has less recoil...

Sorry but the above arguement doesn't make a lot of sense to me. If you equalled the power of the 06, then one would assume that you equaled the recoil in identical rifles. Short vs long action would have no bearing.
Also, if you are touting equalling the power of the 06 with a HE load, would you not then surpass same with a HE 06 round?

I kinda think you need to compare apples to apples. In this case, the 06 supasses the .308 in performance and is probably the easiest to find ammo around, just behind .22. Well, normally.
elkman06

armedandsafe
May 21, 2009, 10:32 PM
I tink the argument for less recoil in the.308 vs.the 30-06 is due to the prevalence of semiautomatics in .308. Some of the recoil energy is delivered to the action and delayed to the shooter. In any case, I just ignore that part of the argument because I never did like teaching physics.

The true advantage of the 30-06 is in the use of heavier bullets. Up to about 168 grains, the two are so close as to be considered the same. One can, in some 30-06 rifles, use varmit loads in the 120 gr range with success, which is more rare in the .308. I've shot everyting from rock chucks to white bear with the 06 and been very happy with it. If I had owned a .308 for the past 60 years instead of the 30-06, I'd have been very happy with that, also. :D

Pops

OttoJara
May 21, 2009, 10:36 PM
35 Rem.:D

Buzzcook
May 21, 2009, 11:35 PM
Get a coin and flip it.

W. C. Quantrill
May 22, 2009, 05:18 AM
Get yourself a .30-06, and your wife a .308, then you have all bases covered. I have both, and when it comes to larger quarry, or longer shots, I pick up the 06. For deer or humans at 200 it wont make any difference, as neither of them takes extreme energy for fatality anyway. Either one will be common cartridges across the US and Canada. Right now, you will find it difficult to get any ammo so it wont make any difference.

Across the hunting spectrum, the .30-06 gives you the widest range of bullet selection of all cartridges. It will handle anything from the 80 gr accelerator round up to 240 gr, and do it well. You can do prairie dogs at 500, or you can do the big bears up close and personal with the heavy loads. It is the most universal cartridge ever made. The .308 is a close second. For some reason, when you want to make small groups in someones skull at 1000 yards, the .308 got chosen. I think it is because of the lesser recoil and more controllabilty.

Para Bellum
May 22, 2009, 11:33 AM
yep, but that little more power is equaled with the HE Loads. And a.308 has less recoil...
...you've misunderstood me. It is obvious to me that a .308 with HE loads will have almost the same recoil (shorter case though) as the .30-06. But I meant, that if the HE isn't needed, you will have the advantage of normal .308 loads which is less recoil, agreed? ;)

James R. Burke
May 22, 2009, 03:21 PM
I have had a few .308, and a few .30-06. They are really both nice calibers wheater you buy or reload. If I had to just pick one it would be the .30-06. That is just me. Nothing wrong with the .308.

OLNfan
May 22, 2009, 05:14 PM
308 ammo is cheaper!! (in my neck of the woods)

Art Eatman
May 22, 2009, 07:28 PM
The majority of hunting rifles, these days, seem to be made with barrels around 22 inches. If you don't do the reloading game, the .308 is pretty much the equal of the '06. The '06 needs 24" to 26" and handloads to really shine and way outdo the .308. But, 300 ft/sec ain't to be sneezed at.

I've used the Federal Premium High Energy cartridges in both the .308 and the '06. I got reports from a guy in Australia that his 26" Model 70 in '06 with that ammo chronographed what the Federal folks said: A 165-grain bullet in the '06 at 3,150. I'm guessing that the claimed data for their .308 ammo would be equally righteous, but I'm too lazy to try to find the one box of that ammo that I have stashed somewhere in the nether regions.

I've read reports that the Hornady claims are a tad optimistic, but no first hand info.

kiwi56
May 23, 2009, 07:51 PM
I must admit that I do have a soft spot for the 30-06 having never owned a 308. I think you have to weigh up advantages vs disadvantages of each
308
able to be fired in a shorter action so lighter rifle and lighter ammo
a very accurate cartridge generally having a slight advantage over the 30-06 but there are always exceptions,
for reloading smaller powder charge meaning more shots per pound of powder

30-06
Bullet is going to be between 200-300 ft per second quicker off the mark meaning flatter trajectory and slightly more energy hitting the target
Ability to cope better with bullets larger than 200 grain

As I said I am naturally biased towards the 30-06 as it has always done everything I have wanted it to. However there are other people who feel exactly the same way about the 308.
Another cartridge that you may find interesting is the 270 Winchester

Fat White Boy
May 23, 2009, 07:57 PM
.308 or .30-06? Yes. Definitely.

globemaster3
May 24, 2009, 05:05 PM
When someone asks about a specific caliber/recoil level, I choose to remain in the [U]EXACTLY/U] the same range.:confused:

The OP asked about .308 or 30-06. So exactly where did your .338 Federal enter the picture? Oh yeah, you went outside the same range and inserted your own...

Unless you handload with Reloder 17.

You're right Phil. Since he didn't mention reloading, I was assuming factory offerings.

skydiver3346
May 24, 2009, 05:14 PM
Because I am older now and don't like the recoil of my 180 grain .30-06 bullets. I still have a Pre-64 Model 70 in .30-06 and love it because it is a classic caliber and this gun shoots great. But over the years, have switched to my trusty .308 because it is so darn accurate and less recoil. It still hits hard like my .06 but everything else is better.

Regolith
May 24, 2009, 06:29 PM
But I meant, that if the HE isn't needed, you will have the advantage of normal .308 loads which is less recoil, agreed?

If you hand load, you can load a .30-06 down to .308 levels quit easily. On the other hand, you can't hand load a .308 up above the levels you can get a .30-06, because the case simply isn't big enough.

Come to think of it, you don't really need to be able to hand load to get those benefits. Many companies are offering .30-06 reduced recoil loads that are downloaded to .308 levels, and several companies offer light magnum loadings for the .30-06 as well.

To put it simply, the .30-06 is a more versatile cartridge.

That being said, I wouldn't feel under gunned hunting with a .308. My father took moose in Alaska with a .308 without any issues.

Also forgot to add:
a very accurate cartridge generally having a slight advantage over the 30-06 but there are always exceptions,

This is false. The .308 cartridge is not inherently more accurate than the .30-06. It may in fact be the other way around, because the '06 can better handle larger, heavier bullets which have a better ballistic coefficient.

From what I understand, this myth arose in the '50s and 60s when the .308 became extremely popular. As a result, all of the new rifle designs that incorporated better accuracy were made for the .308 much more often than the '06. Because of this, some believe that the '06, the previous ruler of the long range roost, was not as accurate. In fact, if you have two identical rifles with identical construction, but one is chambered in the '06 and one is chambered in the .308, the accuracy difference wont be enough to calculate. The '06 will probably be able to shoot flatter, however, because it has a bit of a power advantage.

sc928porsche
May 24, 2009, 07:42 PM
I have both...reload for both. Cant seem to get the 308 to equal the 06. Unless of course I change something around like bullet wt or powder or such. The 06 just outperforms the 308. Period. Only downside is recoil and to tell the truth, it isnt that much either.

shooter007
May 25, 2009, 06:05 AM
Neither......a 270. Perfect for deer and boar. Ballistic coefficients for the .277 Sierra 135 gr are better than both the .308 Win and the 30-06 with any bullet. High veloicity, high knockdown power, accurate, and range.

Para Bellum
May 25, 2009, 03:50 PM
The majority of hunting rifles, these days, seem to be made with barrels around 22 inches. If you don't do the reloading game, the .308 is pretty much the equal of the '06. The '06 needs 24" to 26" and handloads to really shine and way outdo the .308. But, 300 ft/sec ain't to be sneezed at.

I've used the Federal Premium High Energy cartridges in both the .308 and the '06. I got reports from a guy in Australia that his 26" Model 70 in '06 with that ammo chronographed what the Federal folks said: A 165-grain bullet in the '06 at 3,150. I'm guessing that the claimed data for their .308 ammo would be equally righteous, but I'm too lazy to try to find the one box of that ammo that I have stashed somewhere in the nether regions.

I've read reports that the Hornady claims are a tad optimistic, but no first hand info.
Thanks a lot for that info! :)

Neither......a 270. Perfect for deer and boar. Ballistic coefficients for the .277 Sierra 135 gr are better than both the .308 Win and the 30-06 with any bullet. High veloicity, high knockdown power, accurate, and range.
Speaking of Ballistic coefficients: I just seem to have found "THE" bullet for my 7x57 (off-topic, but my thread anyway): The Hornady SST (S&B "PTS"): 0.550 :D
Makes my lill' ol' 7x57 fly far and hit hard :cool:
The .270 is an option for my buddy, I admit.
Handloading isn't.

Art Eatman
May 25, 2009, 08:49 PM
As a generality, for a hunter's shots inside 300 yards the ballistic coefficient is pretty much irrelevant. A higher BC starts being useful as you get out around 400 to 500 yards and are having to guesstimate the range.

kiwi56
May 26, 2009, 01:28 AM
Well I do believe to most shooters the difference in recoil when shooting the same bullets in identical rifles of each cartridge that it would be barely noticable and if you can't tolerate the recoil of either cartridge it's time to take up knitting.

shooter007
May 26, 2009, 02:46 AM
As a generality, for a hunter's shots inside 300 yards the ballistic coefficient is pretty much irrelevant.

Wrong, no bullet flys a straight line. Especially past 100 yds. The capability to overcome bullet drop with high BC's leads to greater accuracy and that can be the difference from dropping a deer to the dirt or never seeing it again.

Regolith
May 26, 2009, 05:13 AM
shooter: nope. At 300 yards, the difference in drop between the highest BC .270 round you can find and the lowest BC .30-06 round you can find is negligible.

They only really start to differ out past 400 yards, and it isn't until around 450-500 that the difference is any larger than the average kill zone of a deer.

Wind drift is similar.

Edit: It should also be noted that BC has nothing to do with accuracy. All a high BC bullet does is make the bullet more resistant to being moved by the wind and it allows it to cut through the air better, allowing for faster flight. This makes it easier to put a bullet on target, because you don't have to compensate for drop or wind as much, but the inherent accuracy of the firearm isn't affected.

Art Eatman
May 26, 2009, 10:30 AM
shooter, use any ballistic table you like. Whatever bullet diameter. To 300 yards, compare the bullet drop between--for example--a BC of around 0.3 to one of about 0.5. For a given cartridge, odds are the difference will be no more than an inch or so.

In the FWIW department, to around 250 to 300 yards, there's no practical difference in trajectory among any of the commonly-used deer cartridges, omitting the hot-shot .22s or the magnums. If you zero at 200, almost all of them will be with a half-inch of two inches high at 100 yards, and they all will be near five to seven inches low at 300. That holds true whether it's flat-based bullets or boat-tails, spitzers or round-nosed.

shooter007
May 27, 2009, 03:12 AM
For a given cartridge, odds are the difference will be no more than an inch or so.


Yes, you are correct, but there is a difference. So you are telling me that a inch doesn't matter? An inch is the difference between having a rack mounted in your office and telling a story for the remainder of your life of a deer you came upon...simple.

Regolith
May 27, 2009, 03:23 AM
Given that the average kill zone of a deer is 9-12 inches...1 inch is negligible, in any direction, provided you put it roughly in the center of that 9 inch circle.

Another thing is that a person who hunts should know where their gun is going to hit. Since what we're talking about here is drop and/or wind drift, and NOT how well the gun groups (i.e. accuracy), all that takes is a little bit of time at the range to sight in the gun and some practice.

It is absurd to suggest that one inch more in drop or wind drift will matter to a hunter who knows his gun and has practiced with it so that it will hit where he wants it to.

globemaster3
May 27, 2009, 09:10 PM
Shooter, you are off base. By a long shot...

In terms of the discussion of .308 and 30-06 ballistics: no, an inch or so is not a big deal.

In terms of a hunting rig, if what you say is correct, if you cannot print into an inch, at any range, then you are a poor hunter? :barf:

shooter007
May 28, 2009, 03:30 AM
In terms of a hunting rig, if what you say is correct, if you cannot print into an inch, at any range, then you are a poor hunter?

Hunting isn't only about how good of a shot you are. Finding your game, tracking your game, and stalking your game are far more important. As for your remark to that if I can't shoot 1 inch groups I'm a poor hunter...well personally that isn't a problem for me, but for those who aren't the best shots that doesn't mean they are a poor hunter and your comment is one of the most idiotic comments about hunting that I've ever heard.

Art Eatman
May 28, 2009, 12:14 PM
shooter, lemme rephrase about why "one inch is irrelevant".

I use an '06, mostly with 150-grain bullets. Say that at 300 yards a flat-base drops six inches, but a boat-tail only drops five inches.

I know this, going in, right? If ol' Bucky is out there at 300 yards, if I'm shooting flat-base I hold six inches above where I want the bullet to hit. If I'm using boat-tail, I hold five inches above where I want the bullet to hit.

So: I say that the one inch difference makes no nevermind. In either case, I'm gonna eat deer meat.

And if it's a heart shot, with that roughly six-inch diameter ruination zone, I don't even have to know which bullet I'm using. If the target is bigger than the rifle's dispersion, you're gonna hit the target.

Been eatin' a lot of deer meat since 1964, so I must be doing something right.

Drifting into FWIW:

A few years back, I set up at my 500-yard table for some testing. The target is a 22" steel plate. It's about 250 feet lower, across Terlingua Creek and about a mile drive by jeep trail to get to it. :) I got all sighted in for 500 yards. 150-grain Sierra SPBTs, 165-grain Sierra HPBTs and 180-grain Sierra SPBTs.

I vaguely recall five or six rounds of the remaining 150-grain bullets from the box. Two four-shot groups with the remaining 165s. A ten-shot string with the remaining 180s; two called flyers. (I'd started all this happiness at the 100-yard bench, messing with the scope and all that stuff.)

Right at one MOA with the 150s. The 165 groups were each 0.8 MOA. The eight 180s were 6". The overall diameter of all this happiness was about ten inches for 23 or 24 shots. IOW, not much trajectory difference at 500 yards for the three weights.

sc928porsche
May 29, 2009, 08:37 AM
You know, Its awfully tough to see 1" at 300 yds. It seems that the thickness of the crosshairs covers that much. Try putting a one inch square in the center of a target.....take it out to 300 and look. At least it is on my 3-9. The 6-24 you can see the square.

James R. Burke
May 29, 2009, 07:15 PM
Sorry already posted.

simonkenton
May 29, 2009, 09:11 PM
Macht nichts.

Tucker 1371
May 29, 2009, 11:18 PM
Whichever you can get cheaper, they perform nearly the same, avg of all loads comes out to about 100fps in favor of the '06. Bullet weights are similar too.

shooter007
May 29, 2009, 11:24 PM
ART,

I get it. To tell you the truth when I make replys like this I get a lot more feedback than if i dont. Thats why I do it. I'm trying to learn as much as possible. It seems a lot of people here have far more expierience than I, even though I'm 26 I'm learning very fast and am becoming more and more familiar with hunting and shooting. Thanks for the knowledge!

MuscleGarunt
May 30, 2009, 05:39 AM
Just go with the 30-06. It does everything the 308 can do a little better with only a little more recoil. The 308 would be a better rifle for you if you were into to target shooting or something along those lines. The 308 will have a slightly longer barrel life then the 30-06. If you reload the 30-06 can take more loadings than the 308, the 308 operates at a higher pressure and is a bit harder on the brass.

You will never ever feel undergunned with the 30-06 in the lower 48 states. You might not with the 308 either but if it was me and I was buying my first centerfire rifle I would go 30-06.

Art Eatman
May 30, 2009, 10:47 AM
shooter, don't sweat it. The problem with the Internet is that we don't have facial expressions or body language to help convey meanings. It's easy to not have stuff come out properly with just typing.

My uncle didn't subscribe to child-labor laws, so he decided that I could reload for him as well as for my own '06--and that was back in 1950. I've pretty much been the perfect example of the horrible example, ever since.

Fun, though.

globemaster3
May 30, 2009, 06:12 PM
Shooter, I am going to disect your posts here to show you something in friendship.

First, An inch is the difference between having a rack mounted in your office and telling a story for the remainder of your life of a deer you came upon...simple.

Based on that, using your measurement, a newbie can deduce this In terms of a hunting rig, if what you say is correct, if you cannot print into an inch, at any range, then you are a poor hunter? Notice that was a question to determine your intent with the above statement.

Which, I agree, is this: your comment is one of the most idiotic comments about hunting that I've ever heard.

But, its YOUR data, not mine!

In addition, I completely think you are on the mark with this: Hunting isn't only about how good of a shot you are. Finding your game, tracking your game, and stalking your game are far more important. and shows you've got a great foundation in hunting, even if you are starting at 26.

Unfortunately, this is lost on some (not pointed at anyone specific here) who only concern themselves with the newest wizbang do-thingy or believe that any rifle that shoots over MOA is worthless.

And I totally agree with Art's The problem with the Internet is that we don't have facial expressions or body language to help convey meanings. It's easy to not have stuff come out properly with just typing.

shooter007
May 30, 2009, 06:48 PM
Dang globe take it easy on me! haha I started hunting when I was about 12. Just within the past six months have I really wanted to try an become a marksman, but again thank you. I learn much from all of you.

Para Bellum
January 10, 2010, 05:40 AM
...I now tend towards the .30-06 because the ammo-selection is just wider. Rather impressive what all can be covered with a .30-06. Federal eg offers cartridges from 110gr / 3400 ft/sec to 220gr / 2400ft/sec. It seems you can cover virtually every hunting situation worldwide with this one caliber in a fine rifle.

globemaster3
January 10, 2010, 07:57 AM
Thanks for checking back with that. I wondered what you had done in terms of selection. You really couldn't go wrong with either.

The 30-06 is very versatile.;)

isnipe
January 10, 2010, 04:44 PM
+1 for .30-06

HiBC
January 10, 2010, 05:23 PM
Funny,this question ought to be good for a big yawn ,but look how much fun we are having!!

IMHO,the cartridge designation is the minor factor.It does not matter.

Now,maybe I just really like the Springfield 1903 action,and want a rifle based on it.30-06 makes sense.

Maybe I want a short,light rifle like a Rem Model 7,.308 makes sense.

Maybe,for whatever reason,I think I would like to shoot 180 gr and over bullets mostly.I'd say 30-06.

For the OP,I suggest you pick whatever rifle or cartridge of the two that you like best.They will both be excellent choices,and the grass will always be greener on the other side of the fence.

A tip,selecting the right bullet is a far better place to ponder.The cartridge case is just a bottle to hold some powder.

And your personal preferences,even if they are different than mine,matter more than all the opinions you will get here,as far as whether a .308 or a 30-06 ore "Best" They are both among the best for the appropriate task.

Jack O'Conner
January 10, 2010, 06:33 PM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/bullelkCusterCounty-1-1.jpg

The question may appear valid but its truly touching upon theoretical advantages of one cartridge over another.

FACT: most big game animals are shot within 150 yards or less.

FACT: out to approx 175 yards, there is no discernible difference in performance between 300 Savage, .308, or 30-06.

FACT: Speer's Premium 165 grain bullet will out-penetrate 220 grain Remington core-lockt bullet when fired into wet newspapers at 150 yards.

Mere weight is not as relevant as it was 30 years ago. Bullet design and metallurgy can not be ignored!

Jack

JohnO
January 10, 2010, 07:32 PM
Jack, You forgot one thing.

Fact: When hit in the kill zone you outlined the elk won't know what caliber he was shot with. :D

langenc
January 10, 2010, 07:48 PM
Shoot what you got or can get the best deal on!!

Big Bill
January 11, 2010, 10:24 PM
I would make my decision based on ammo price and availibility. Since the 308 is a viable military round, it's possible there will be shortages. And, I also think 30-06 ammo is less money for the premium hunting rounds. I almost exclusively shoot Federal Fusion ammo. Here's their charts...

http://www.fusionammo.com/products/rifle.aspx

semi_problomatic
January 12, 2010, 10:56 PM
B.C. is a bunch of mahocky to make you buy bullets. It has no relation to reality. They use a perfect bullet, AT sea level, shot at a perfect temp and humidity, out of a weapon that makes the bullet keep a constant velocity and do some crazy math against what an actual bullet does. Check the link its a lot more technical but it's there.

http://stevespages.com/bc.html

But as for .308 and 30-06...same bullet with just a bit more powder. But what makes you feel coolest. Recoil really isn't a factor with the 19.99 limbsaver pad you can stick on it, or put a muzzle brake on it. There's no such thing as over-killing. I personally like the .308, had a 300WM and it gave me bad habits that were hard to break.

phil mcwilliam
January 13, 2010, 07:21 AM
I use a 308, but only because out of the 2 calibers listed Sako only made their lever action rifle in 308.
I have mates that shoot 30-06's , and although they may be 10% better in performance ballistically, in the real world of hunting I have never noticed the difference.
When I travelled to Africa a year ago for a plains game safari ,I didnt take my rifle, but was suprised when the guide furnished me with a 308.
The 308 downed Eland & Zebra with one shot kills using 180 grain bullets, no trouble at all. I was surprised that the guide & his friends mainly used 308's for hunting in Africa.
That said, pick the rifle that you are happy with regardless of caliber.
I guess if I was looking at a new bolt action rifle & I didn't already own the 308, I would probably be swayed by the advantages of a 30-06.

youp
January 13, 2010, 07:45 AM
+1

That said, pick the rifle that you are happy with regardless of caliber.

Only advantage I can think of is you may be able to get some 308 ammo off the blue hats should SHTF.

Art Eatman
January 13, 2010, 11:45 AM
Nuthin' like necro-threadia...

:D:D:D