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SkySlash
April 22, 2009, 04:08 PM
Hi, I'm SkySlash, and I'm a DumbSh*t.

I was cleaning my AR-15 yesterday, and decided that rather than using my normal method of careful guided-rod bore cleaning, I'd use a trusty old bore snake. Except I pulled to hard... The snake was being pulled from the flash hider end, and got pulled in just hard enough that it's embedded about 3/4 of an inch into the throat of the barrel. Just far enough that I can't get ahold of it with any needle nose pliers, and I can't hook it because it's compressed enough the thread just tears.

I feel like an idiot...I've never done anything quite this stupid with a gun.

I asked a buddy about it, and he suggested I turn the barrel, receiver side up, and use a penetrating oil on the snake. He said to reapply it over a period of days, and to keep applying until the oil begins to drip out the tip of the barrel. At that point, he said to try and use a wooden dowel rod and carefully tap the snake back out of the barrel.

I completely trust my buddy's advice, but I was curious if anyone else had encountered this before, and how they resolved it.

-SS

boycan
April 22, 2009, 04:12 PM
I think the oil will be detrimental, I remember reading somewhere that someone else got one stuck because they said they put too much oil on the snake and it expanded as it soaked the oil up? I think they had to wait a few days for the snake to dry a little before they managed to get it unstuck.

Willie Lowman
April 22, 2009, 04:23 PM
the oil will be detrimental
+1

leave it alone for a few days and let whatever you already had in it drip out.

You were using a correct .22/223 snake right? I would say get some one to help, have one person pull on he snake and another push with a dowel. To much pressure from the dowel will cause the fibers to be pressed against the inside of the barrel, getting it stuck tighter.

Or just send your upper to me. Then it will be my problem, I promise to let you know how I fixed it. :)

comn-cents
April 22, 2009, 04:23 PM
If it was me I'd tie the sanke to a door knob and pull it through.
If it was my gun...

Casimer
April 22, 2009, 04:51 PM
At that point, he said to try and use a wooden dowel rod and carefully tap the snake back out of the barrel.

I tried to remove a bore-snake using a dowel once - the dowel expanded radially and got stuck in the bore. My advice would be to try a brass rod instead.

ar15chase
April 22, 2009, 05:03 PM
How about compressed air? Just a thought.

impalacustom
April 23, 2009, 03:25 AM
Absolutely do not use a wooden dowl. You think you have trouble now... In all honesty I don't know how to get one out of a barrel but one other problem is reversing the direction of the snake is going to cause all sorts of hell on the brass bristles when they bind up on the bore. Call your nearest university and ask them what will dissolve nylon but not harm steel. Good luck.

pwelsh4hd
April 23, 2009, 08:15 AM
Can you make contact with the folks that make the boresnake? I'm sure you aren't the first person to have this problem, and I bet they've heard it all and know many tricks you can use to get it out without doing any harm.

Dragon55
April 23, 2009, 08:18 AM
Formic acid will dissolve nylon but I don't know what it would harm in the barrell.

Doyle
April 23, 2009, 08:28 AM
I second the compressed air. If you have a compressor with one of those air squirters that has a rubber tip, you should be able to get a good enough seal to blow it out.

Alleykat
April 23, 2009, 10:13 AM
Lots of threads just like this one. I'll never use a Bore Snake! Barrel should be cleaned from chamber end, with a good cleaning rod and bore guide.

rocket12
April 23, 2009, 11:03 AM
Never use a boresnake,never ever:barf:

kayakersteve
April 23, 2009, 11:26 AM
Please let us now how you resolve this - I am sure you didn't start this thread to hear all of these others tell you how "dumb" you were to use one and am sorry it is stuck in the bore. I recently started using one because they are so darned easy, but this thread and others is giving me second thoughts. PLEASE INFORM US ON HOW YOU GET IT OUT.

SDC
April 23, 2009, 11:27 AM
I haven't had any problems with boresnakes, but I also only use them from the chamber end; in your situation, I would probably try to make a modern version of a "worm" (what they used to pull a stuck ball out of a muzzle-loader) out of piano-wire, available from a hobby store, by heating the end up, twisting it into a corkscrew, and sharpening the end to bite into the fibres. You might also be able to find a set of long-nosed hemostats (the very thin locking clamps that doctors use in surgery) that might be able to grab the end.

johnwilliamson062
April 23, 2009, 11:57 AM
there are quite a few threads on this.
Everyone I have read ended up with the worm approach.
Took a good bit of time but it worked in every case without further damaging the rifle.

Someone tried blanks in one thread. Did not work, but ruined the barrel. I would guess compressed air could do the same if you got the compression high enough that it would dislodge the bore snake.

Like others said, you are always supposed to clean from chamber end whenever possible, although I do not think that is what caused your problem. It i just like you always brush a billiards table from the end you break at towards the end you rack at.

darkgael
April 23, 2009, 12:26 PM
Take the bolt carrier out and the upper off the lower and use a brass rod as suggested earlier. Use a helper as suggested. Try twisting the snake so as to tighten the weave and diminish its diameter. The snake is fully extended in the barrel? Compressed air will blow by. The brass rod will not hurt the barrel though the snake is done for.
I use bore snakes on all of my guns, AR included....always from the breech end. Never a problem.
The rod will work.
A fellow that I know gave me a barrel that he said was not savable - it had a screwdriver bit and a wooden dowel in it. Brass rod got them both out. The barrel was damaged a bit by whoever had tried the screwdriver but not from the rod.
Pete

comn-cents
April 23, 2009, 12:41 PM
I love bore snakes! Good luck getting it out.

be smarter than the B.S.

johnwilliamson062
April 23, 2009, 01:37 PM
wait, is the string still on the snake, or did it snap off? I assumed it snapped off and the snake was already done for.

SkySlash
April 23, 2009, 02:25 PM
Lot's of good suggestions. I was cleaning the gun from the breech end, that's how the snake got stuck...

I've researched this all over the net, and the most common solution that seems to work is what my buddy suggested. Soak the snake it penetrating oil over a period of days, and then try to gently tap it out with a brass rod or wooden dowel.

I'm going to keep working on that, and I'll let every one know how it works out. In the future though, I'm going to keep cleaning like I usually do, with a bore guide and a brass rod.

-SS

orionengnr
April 23, 2009, 05:43 PM
Please, do yourself a favor and do a search first.

I know I've read threads on this before, but I don't remember how they were resolved. I do recall that compressed air, grease gun, oil, etc, did not work, and seem to recall several people who tried the wooden dowel only to make things worse.

Take the time, do your research, and above all, don't make it worse than it already is.

Unclenick
April 24, 2009, 01:48 PM
Skyslash,

We still don't know if you broke the string when you pulled too hard or if this is the right caliber snake? The problem I am concerned with is whether or not the brush portion of the snake is in the bore? If it is, then its bristles are deflected rearward and it will strongly resist reversing and can mark your bore if you try to back it out (despite the bristles being bronze). It may turn out the best method is to cut off the boresnake at the breech end and try to move it forward with the brass rod? Call Hoppes and ask? 800-423-3537. Your's can't possibly be the first one they've dealt with, and there is no point in listening to speculation if they have an established answer.

SkySlash
April 24, 2009, 03:12 PM
The bore snake was the right size for the barrel. Yes the string is broken off. The problem is that the bore snake got pulled too far into the barrel.

The string side of the snake is coming out the flash hider end of the barrel, and the other end of the snake is not accessible from the breech because it is stuck inside the chamber/

The reason it is stuck is because the hand loop at the end of the snake got pulled too far into the barrel. The chamber where the case goes was large enough to house this loop, but the barrel itself was too small for it to be fully pulled through.

Thus the snake can't be pulled fully through, its too large, and it can't be pulled back the other way because its stuck up inside the chamber and unreachable.

Does that description make more sense?

-SS

comn-cents
April 24, 2009, 03:25 PM
No I'm sure everyone is more confussed than ever.

4thPointofContact
April 24, 2009, 03:43 PM
I've never seen a properly-sized boresnake where the looped end couldn't be pulled through the bore and I've never seen a properly-sized boresnake that couldn't be completely pulled through from one end to the other no matter which end of the barrel it was started from.


Then again, I haven't seen Every boresnake in existence, I suppose there could be one that was made that way. It's never been a problem on any of the .223 'snakes I've used so far.

MrNiceGuy
April 24, 2009, 03:45 PM
I'm pretty sure you're just squeamish.

pull it through.. it's a tough pull the first few times, it's not stuck.
The bore snake is not too big, perhaps your muscles are just too small ;)

comn-cents
April 24, 2009, 03:47 PM
There are pistol one's that are shorter maybe that's it.


Be smarter than a bore snake!

Casimer
April 24, 2009, 06:03 PM
You could always take it to a gunsmith. One of the guys that I use locally has tools that he's made specifically for this purpose. It's a pretty common problem.

darkgael
April 26, 2009, 06:30 AM
The problem is that the bore snake got pulled too far into the barrel........
The reason it is stuck is because the hand loop at the end of the snake got pulled too far into the barrel.

That did not clarify. These two sentences don't work for me. It's the "too far" part in both sentences. If the bore snake is designed to be pulled completely through the barrel from one end to the other, how could it be pulled in too far and get stuck because of that?
Sometimes, as noted earlier, a bore snake will require considerable effort to pull through.
Pete

Dingoboyx
April 26, 2009, 06:48 AM
As the snake is nylon, can the barrel be removed from the stock and the barrel be put in an oven and bought to a temperature that will shrink the nylon? Would this hurt the temper of the barrel?

I guess also it depends if the brush part of the snake is in there too? I think heat might help tho? Nylon tends to shrink (and go more plastic (harder, perhaps less friction) when heated....

Alleykat
April 26, 2009, 08:42 AM
Just wish I could find that 23-yr-old that I broke up with about 17 yrs ago! She could blow the B.S. out from the muzzle end! :eek:

comn-cents
April 26, 2009, 10:59 AM
lol that's funny stuff.

Unclenick
April 26, 2009, 11:38 AM
Skyslash,

Yes, that description did make more sense for me. Where I am mystified, since those tools are meant to pull all the way through a bore, is how it could both be the right size for a .223 barrel and not fit through all the way? I'm guessing you figured that loop was to pull the thing back through the other way, but it is just meant to let you hang the thing up to dry. At the very least, the brush would have to clear the muzzle before you could do that to avoid jamming the brush or marking the bore. Brushes are not meant to be reversed in a bore or they will either jam or mark the bore. Despite the bronze being softer than steel, a borescope will reveal marks from "pinning" brush bristles that way.

I was wondering if the chamber somehow cut the Nylon so it bunched up back there or something? Did the brush portion clear the muzzle?

oldone
April 26, 2009, 11:47 AM
Oil, compressed air & O2 just don't mix well. Just remember how a diesel works.

Alleykat
April 27, 2009, 09:34 AM
Cut the barrel off where you can get a good grip on that snake!

F. Guffey
April 27, 2009, 10:35 AM
I make my own version of a bore snake, by design there is no way it can get stuck.

Someone 30 + or - a few miles southeast of east of you got a 303 British type (Santa Fe Jungle) rifle with a wood dowel stuck in the barrel, or he got the dowel stuck in the barrel, I told him I would help him but he had to promise he would not attempt removing by pounding, he had to try, I did not know if the dowel was solid or two separate dowels, he pounded on one end, the other end did not move, I turned a brass rod down to .308 and gave it to him with a short drill bit with instructions to drill a short distance, remove saw dust, pound and repeat the process until he could measure progress or failure. and then drill again, I never heard from him after that, my plan was to install a screw on the end of the brass rod, screw into the dowel then use a slide and stop to make a slide hammer (pull to stretch) instead of driving (pound and upset). If the screw had removed wood when pulled I had planed to pound and drill again. I do not know what the bore snake company will recommend, but without them I would make a guide that would resemble a case head for a center (guide) and a stop on a drill that would prevent the drill from getting into the neck of the chamber.


As Darkgael said, gain access to the barrel, a case head with part of the body would work as a guide if you enlarge the flash hole for the drill, drill bit stops are available from home depot and Lowes.


F. Guffey

F. Guffey
April 27, 2009, 12:32 PM
.308 down to .300

sorry about that,

F. Guffey

honkylips
April 27, 2009, 03:57 PM
Oil, compressed air & O2 just don't mix well. Just remember how a diesel works.


Diesels work with about 20:1 compression, resulting in approximately 1000 degrees Farenheit combustion chamber temperatures. Not applicable here.

MagnumWill
April 30, 2009, 03:21 PM
Chamber a round in it! :p:D

Post a pic, mebbe we can think of something creative.

bamafan4life
April 30, 2009, 10:17 PM
i might be wrong but are bore snakes made out of cotton or nylon thread? if all else fails u might be able to burn it out! but if it nylon it would probly melt causing the barrel to need to be cleaned real good! but i would not take my advice on this one. cause im not completly sure.

Tex S
April 30, 2009, 11:21 PM
You might also be able to find a set of long-nosed hemostats (the very thin locking clamps that doctors use in surgery) that might be able to grab the end.

Doctors use them in surgery? Is that what those things are really for?

:D Sorry guys... I couldn't resist.

SkySlash
May 5, 2009, 09:46 AM
Here's the story of how I did this.

I usually always clean this particular rifle, a very high end custom-built AR-15, very meticulously and with great care using a bore guide, a brush, and other assorted specialty cleaning tools. For whatever idiotic dumb**** reason I can't recall, I decided to run a bore snake through it to see how well it would clean. I used a .223 Bore Snake, and tried to pull the snake through the barrel completely. No dice. The Bore Snake has a hand loop on the end which was designed to stop at the breech, and then be pulled back out using the hand loop. I, unfortunately, forgot this bit of detail. I normally only use a bore snake on my cheap .22's, and in those, it is not possible for the hand loop to get pulled into the barrel. Unfortunately for me, the .223 has a larger case and the chamber is large enough for the handle to get caught in.

I pulled it into the chamber, and then stared at it confused when it wouldn't pull any further. About that time, I realize what had occurred, and decided to try and get the hand loop back out of the chamber to pull the snake out. At the time, I had no tools to accomplish this, and I failed horribly. I decided to try and pull the snake from the muzzle end, to no avail. I had about 2 feet of snake hanging out the muzzle, so I tied it around a post, and pulled as hard as I could. Too my dismay, and shock, the bore snake broke off inside the barrel rather than pulling through, and all that accomplished was pulling the snake further into the barrel.

I asked a friend for advice, and did what he suggested. He suggested I soak the snake in penetrating oil by pouring it into the chamber until it began dripping out the other end. This took about 4 days of soaking to accomplish. Once that was complete, I did Step 2 of his plan which was to tap the snake with a rod from the muzzle end until it came out the chamber end. Stupidly, I got these instructions reversed in my head and I tapped from the chamber end instead. I managed over the course of hours, to get the snake to move about 6" further into the barrel. Once I couldn't get it to move any further, I decided to revisit the friends instructions, and realized I had been tapping from the wrong end. I then proceeded to tap the snake from the other end, and it moved about 6" into the barrel, but hasn't moved any closer to the chamber end. I now have about 5" of snake, compacted and stuck halfway into the 16" barrel from both ends.

At this point, I went to the gun show, bought hemostats, jags, specialty tools, and talked to every gunsmith at the show for suggestions. Every single one of them suggested doing exactly what my friend suggested, but did the :eek: face when I told them what I had done so far to try and remove the snake. At that point, to a man, they all said take it to a gun smith.

So that's when I posted this thread, out of frustration, but in looking at a lot of the options, I'm stuck. Chemically removing the nylon is a poor idea, so no dice there as it can harm the metal. I have thought about burning it out, but I haven't thought of a way to heat the barrel, without risking affecting the finish on it. At this point, I have found a reputable gunsmith, and I'm taking it to him this afternoon for a quote.

Hopefully he can fix it, if not, I'm out a barrel I can't replace because they aren't made any longer. All because I tried to take a lazy mans shortcut with a damn boresnake. Let this be a lesson to some of you out there, don't take shortcuts, and damn sure don't do it with your most prized weapon...

-SS :(

SkySlash
May 5, 2009, 12:56 PM
Just dropped it off at the gunsmith. He said $35 and it'd be ready in a week. He doesn't think it'll be too difficult to remove, but if it is he'll double the price.

I expect to pay double, but $70 is still far cheaper than I figured it would be.

Should have just done this to start with...I've spent 3x that on tools trying to fix it myself.

-SS

skydiver3346
May 5, 2009, 01:36 PM
Exactly what he said makes the most sense. I might make one extra suggestion. On the brass rod, attach a .22 caliber brass cleaning jag to help push the Bore Snake out (no damage to the end of your brass rod this way). Gently start tapping the rod and increase pressure on the tapping until it comes out. Best of luck......

hogdogs
May 5, 2009, 02:17 PM
Call me crazy but I can't justify paying anyone to do any service other than surgery (for minor stuff like stitches or staples I do myself unless on left hand/arm then I make mrs.hogdogs help me)... Small diameter long (4 inch or better) brass screw and a dent puller...
Or any other of numerous tricks up my sleeve...
Brent

impalacustom
May 6, 2009, 03:07 AM
You do realize everytime you reverse the direction of that boresnake your ruining the bore because the brass bristles are "biting" into the barrel. Bore snakes are meant to be pulled completely through, loop end and all. Never ever stop a brass brush and reverse the direction, even on a cleaning rod. Go all the way through.

darkgael
May 6, 2009, 06:48 AM
Sky: When it is ready and you go to pick it up, please ask the smith how he got the snake out. We'd (probably) all like to know. I would for sure.
Pete

SDC
May 6, 2009, 06:58 AM
You do realize everytime you reverse the direction of that boresnake your ruining the bore because the brass bristles are "biting" into the barrel.

You're definitely going to have to work HARDER, because you're trying to reverse the direction of the brush (ie. bending the bristles back against themselves), but "ruining the bore" is ludicrous; for that to happen, the bronze wires making up the brush would have to be harder than the steel barrel, which simply isn't going to happen, any more than if you had a piece of marshmallow stuck in the barrel.

impalacustom
May 7, 2009, 02:53 AM
SDC, run a borescope up a barrel someone reversed a brush on and look at the "pits" the brush left. You definition of a ruined barrel might be different than mine. Sure the gun will still shoot, but it sure isn't something I'd recommend doing. I'd whoop some ass if someone did that to my Bartlein.

SDC
May 7, 2009, 08:22 AM
Once again, you're not going to make a "pit" in a barrel with a brush made of a softer material than the barrel is made of, any more than you're going to drill a hole in a receiver with a drill made out of a green bean. You may end up smearing lubricant or left-over jacket material around (making it APPEAR to be a pit), but that's a far, far cry from either "pitting" or "ruining" a barrel.

SweetKnuckles
May 7, 2009, 01:01 PM
The greenbean drill gave a funny image.


Sky, please keep us updated.

.bookmarked.

comn-cents
May 7, 2009, 01:31 PM
Does anyone really think that a brush of any kind is going to bite into the bore? Really, you shoot a hard object (jacketed bullet) out of the barrel at 3000 fps. You think a brush is going to hurt it? REALLY!

Orlando
May 7, 2009, 02:15 PM
It may make fine scratches but I honestly dont see how its going to effect accuracy. At the same time I wouldnt make a habit of reversing the brush in mid barrel

doobie
May 7, 2009, 02:45 PM
If the barrel is >16" cut it down to 16". If it is 16, get a AR pistol lower and cut it to 7.5". Cut carefully to ensure you don't also cut through the bore snake.

davlandrum
May 7, 2009, 03:15 PM
The Bore Snake has a hand loop on the end which was designed to stop at the breech, and then be pulled back out using the hand loop.

This is the part that keeps confusing me. This is not the way any bore snake I have ever seen works. Of course, I may not have seen them all...

F. Guffey
May 8, 2009, 08:53 AM
Yes seems like a conflict with reversing directions and turning the bristles on one hand and the ideal the snake is directional, it goes in one end and out the other, then there is the loop. I can not say I have ever seen one, I have seen barrels being cleaned with what looked like dusters, I did not ask because I was not curious.. As I said I make my own version of a bore snake, it is imposable (for me) to get it stuck.

Pounding with the ideal nothing dynamic is going on. If an object is stuck and pounding does not move the object consider the stuck object when pounded is upsetting (expanding), in the rest of the world this expanding and pounding would increase the diameter of the hole (bore), except guns, guns have an exemption? to abuse. After all a bullet traveling down the barrel does the barrel no harm, how could pounding harm it.

F. Guffey

JWT
May 8, 2009, 09:43 AM
Have seen several threads concerning bore snakes that were stuck in barrels. Don't ever recall seeing the outcome or solution to getting one out. Would appreciate it if Sky could post what the gunsmith used to remove the snake from the barrel - assuming it was eventually removed.

SkySlash
May 8, 2009, 10:00 AM
Once I get the gun back, I'll definitely post what he did to get the snake out of the barrel.

-SS

Scorch
May 8, 2009, 11:52 AM
This thread reminds me of a 3 Stooges skit. People can come up with more Rube Goldberg ways to accomplish something easy than I thought possible. I think gunsmiths ought to charge more for their work.

Bosshoff
May 12, 2009, 05:16 PM
Yeah, this makes no sense. "Boresnake" brand bore snakes get pulled all the way though the bore. In one end, out the other. None of them have a looped handle which will pull through the bore. I have 5 or 6 of them, the ends are spliced into a loop, and go right through no problem.

hogdogs
May 18, 2009, 01:10 PM
Any updates yet?
Brent

muzzelblast
May 18, 2009, 08:32 PM
"Boresnake" brand bore snakes get pulled all the way though the bore. In one end, out the other. None of them have a looped handle which will pull through the bore. I have 5 or 6 of them, the ends are spliced into a loop, and go right through no problem.


Correct . They are to be pulled straight through - completely - and not back and forth.

The poster who thinks bronze brushes will not dimple bores when reversed has apparently not had access to a bore scope. Here's an experiment for you. Take a flat piece of good steel and a pencil with a rubber eraser. Place the steel on a table and over a period of 15-20 minutes just raise the pencil several inches and, using your fingers as a guide, drop the pencil and let the rubber eraser bounce off the steel. Let the eraser hit the same spot repeatedly and then look at the steel plate with a good magnifying glass or low power misroscope. You will see a crater froming where the eraser was landing. Wind can drive a piece of broom straw deeply into or through an oak tree. Seems to defy physics but it does happen.

PS: The instructions that come with bore brushes and bore snakes state DO Not Reverse Direction with the brush in the bore. That is for a reason.

darkgael
May 19, 2009, 05:39 AM
The instructions that come with bore brushes and bore snakes state DO Not Reverse Direction with the brush in the bore. That is for a reason.
I'm pretty sure that the reason is because of the structure of the brush more than anything else. If I reverse a "normal" bore brush, it will get stuck. There are other brass bore brushes, such as muzzleloader bore brushes, which can be reversed without sticking.
Pete

muzzelblast
May 19, 2009, 07:11 AM
There are other brass bore brushes, such as muzzleloader bore brushes, which can be reversed without sticking

Worn brushes and/or undersized brushes will reverse fairly easily in a barrel as well. However, new brushes can be a problem. Even when they do roll over after reversing them in the bore it bends the bristles and the brush is no longer as effective. Also, most bronze is tougher, harder, and stiffer than brass.

Homer03
May 19, 2009, 07:39 AM
If you cut a notch in a rod (like the nock of an arrow) and sharpen the edges you can twist and cut and tear the thing out a few threads at a time. It will take awhile but does the trick. Had to do it when i was 13 and the string broke leaving a patch in a rifle. A snake is alot more junk but i expect patience is all it will take. Obviously-some measures to protect the rifling is helpfull.

hogdogs
June 3, 2009, 01:48 PM
Any new info on this?
Brent

MuscleGarunt
June 3, 2009, 01:51 PM
It's just God punishing you for using a bore snake.:D

Alleykat
June 4, 2009, 06:54 PM
Probably the same snake that doomed Adam and Eve!! :eek:

SkySlash
June 5, 2009, 02:01 PM
Still at the gunsmith... He doesn't think he can get it out without harming the barrel. I'm probably going to pick it up and try to use MEK on it. I'm out of any other ideas.

-SS :(

JWT
June 5, 2009, 02:49 PM
Has anyone ever contacted the manufactures of the 'snakes' and see if they have any recommendations for removing them if they get stuck in a barrel?

SDC
June 5, 2009, 06:24 PM
Along homer's idea, it would probably be easiest to make a worm out of a twisted wire brush, on a cleaning rod; most of these are made from wire that has been twisted with bronze bristles in between the two main wire strands of the brush. if you were to cut the brush off at the tip, you could unwind the main wire strands and sharpen the ends to make a worm of sorts, but you would still have to work at it for a while to get enough out to grab it with some pliers.

SkySlash
June 6, 2009, 11:36 AM
JWT: I did call the manufacturer about a month ago, and after a few of their guys conferred, they suggested I take it to a gunsmith. They had no suggestions.

In better news, the smith just called me and said he has it out and the barrel is ready for pickup!!!!! :D :D :D

I'll ask him how he did it and share once I know.

-SS

rocket12
June 6, 2009, 11:40 AM
now, make a note to yourself " I will NEVER use a boresnake again"

BillM
June 6, 2009, 12:19 PM
The bore snake was the right size for the barrel. Yes the string is broken off. The problem is that the bore snake got pulled too far into the barrel.




Well---ah---now I'm REALLY confused. I thought a bore snake was a
"pull through" system.

claymore1500
June 6, 2009, 12:19 PM
Take a flat piece of good steel and a pencil with a rubber eraser. Place the steel on a table and over a period of 15-20 minutes just raise the pencil several inches and, using your fingers as a guide, drop the pencil and let the rubber eraser bounce off the steel. Let the eraser hit the same spot repeatedly and then look at the steel plate with a good magnifying glass or low power misroscope. You will see a crater froming where the eraser was landing.

Come on!!! With that logic, How could anyone drive a car for more than a couple of months, The wind and airborne debris would errode the car away.

While I have to agree that just because the brass is softer than the steel, I know that if you use a brass hammer on a piece of steel, you can mark the steel, but concider that you are exerting a lot of force when pounding with a hammer.

comn-cents
June 6, 2009, 01:03 PM
I'm using one right now!:p

SkySlash
June 6, 2009, 03:41 PM
The gunsmith let the snake sit long enough to dry out. He then welded a brass "drywall screw" onto the end of a brass rod and screwed it deep into the snake. He said it took several tries, but once he snagged it he was able to pull it straight out.

Barrel had no visible damage at all.

-SS

surg_res
June 6, 2009, 07:48 PM
Good for you! Sounds like the best $70 you'll ever spend. I have to say the suspense of this thread has been intense, glad you guys kept at it.

SkySlash
June 8, 2009, 01:15 PM
Yup! Ended up being $86.50, but it was worth every penny and then some!

-SS :o

Jazzninja
June 8, 2009, 03:21 PM
Man, I'm too late. I used to repair brass and woodwind musical instruments, and one of the more common "repairs" that I ran into was that of the silk bore swab that had gotten stuck in the bore of an oboe. That is the exact fix that I would use. I made a tool by brazing a small wood screw onto a long brass rod. I would chuck the screwless end of the rod into a bench motor (power off) and then carefully insert the rod into the bore and hand turn the chuck. The screw would bite in to the swab and you could pull it out the way it came in. I only charged $15.00 though. Glad you were able to get the issue resolved.

MagnumWill
June 11, 2009, 01:00 AM
Once again, you're not going to make a "pit" in a barrel with a brush made of a softer material than the barrel is made of, any more than you're going to drill a hole in a receiver with a drill made out of a green bean. You may end up smearing lubricant or left-over jacket material around (making it APPEAR to be a pit), but that's a far, far cry from either "pitting" or "ruining" a barrel.


+1 says me and my machinist

I can't remember what Rockwell number brass is, but I know that barrel steel is much higher. a couple reversals here and there shouldn't hurt it.

and when using my boresnake--i NEVER reverse it-- it comes out the muzzle, out the muzzle, out the muzzle.... you know :)