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View Full Version : Are tube fed and detachable magizines bound by the same rules and a few other ?'s


flippycat
April 1, 2009, 12:45 AM
I know this seems like a very odd question, but I would like to know if they are considered the same in regards to capacity laws. All I have read so far are specific to say detachable magazines limited to either 10 rnds in some locations and 30 in others.

A tube should not fall under detachable magazine class correct?

Now a second separate set of questions.

Would modifying a tube magazine setup (still a tube) to accept say 80 rounds as long as it was not detachable still be considered a tube fed magazine?

Here is why I ask, I am a fairly skilled custom fiberglass guy and have dabbled in metal fabrication to be considered savvy :)

I had a vision of a total setup that would allow a 80 round setup like this if used in connection with a custom designed stock that sort of just came to me. The more I thought about it, the more I realized that it would work extremely well!

I even drew it out on paper and realized that this has not been done before.Nothing even close to it has been done. I actually got a very warm feeling come over me, probably like the guy who invented the bar code.

So.... yet another question, would a setup like this need some sort of ATF approval in drawing and details before it could be fabricated?

Would a working/non working mock up be required?

Should I just approach an already established manufacturer and hope they do not steal my design?

I did already do the poor mans copyright on the initial design and to be honest I see no way to improve upon it unless it is materials used.

Any insight into this would be greatly appreciated. I know I have been a little vague of the actual design but I feel I gave enough details to be able to get the answers I am looking for.

And just a note to mention, nothing about my intended design changes the way the firearm was intended to fire or function from its stock manufacturer specs, only its tube capacity and full length stock would be changed.

teeroux
April 1, 2009, 01:19 AM
Should I just approach an already established manufacturer and hope they do not steal my design?


You should always get a patent or apply for a patent on new designs before taking something to market it will save you a lot of woe and money. At the very least if you can't wait or don't have money copy all of your work and mail it certified mail to yourself keep it safe and do not open it till you need to prove you are the original inventer.

flippycat
April 1, 2009, 01:36 AM
teeroux...At the very least if you can't wait or don't have money copy all of your work and mail it certified mail to yourself keep it safe and do not open it till you need to prove you are the original inventer

me-I did already do the poor mans copyright on the initial design and to be honest I see no way to improve upon it unless it is materials used.

:P I have been doing that for years now lol.

teeroux
April 1, 2009, 01:40 AM
Yeah my brother does that a lot with his artwork and I have done it on writtings and poems.:)

gretske
April 1, 2009, 03:15 AM
Flippycat =

Get thyself to a patent attorney, ASAP! There is no such thing as a "poor man's copyright" for a patent. That only works for writings, not for inventions. You patent ideas, and copyright words. Patenting an invention and copyrighting a literary work are entirely different. To get a patent, you need an attorney to file the documents with the US Patent and Trademark Office. If you take your idea to someone else, and they use it, you will have to sue them in an expensive, low-probability lawsuit. The more you describe this thing in public, the less patentable the idea becomes.

Read about patents here. (http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/doc/general/index.html#ptsc)

Don't write another word about this and go get a consultation with a patent attorney who can tell you what to do next, and if the idea can be patented. An initial consultation is usually free. Take advantage of it, you will be glad you did!

flippycat
April 1, 2009, 11:56 PM
The patent stuff is good information...:) but the real key is behind the other questions as to it even being worth it to pursue if it touched on grey areas.

hogdogs
April 2, 2009, 12:25 AM
No need for a patent attorney... I have a buddy who has self filed and been awarded MANY patents... the coolest thing is a foot scrubber for the shower that with the foot you pump a bit of soap on to an inverted scrub brush and scrub your feet without bending over... He never really took any to production or sold them, just wanted to lock them down...
Paid next to nothing for them as well.
Brent

Csspecs
April 2, 2009, 12:32 AM
I've invented many many things over the years.

Never got a patent on any of them, never had anyone steal them either.

Until you have a "WORKING" item don't waste the money. 500.00-5000.00 you don't spend can be like profit :D