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View Full Version : Still Chasing That Perfect Round...


dalecooper51
March 22, 2009, 07:33 PM
I started shooting skeet last summer and have yet to run a perfect round. We had a real good squad of friends. It was a real nice day today. Everyone was having a good time and shooting pretty well. My downfall was when I realized that I hadn't used my option after station 6. I thought to myself, wow you're doing pretty well. That was all it took and I choked on low 7 and then missed my option ending with a 23.

Maybe next weekend...

oneounceload
March 23, 2009, 03:20 PM
You NEVER look at or worry about your score or the target jinx fairy will get you!

:D

I have done the exact same thing before.....I even made it once to low 8 and missed my last shot..........

I think that's why I moved to 5-stand and sporting - there the objective is to try and hit as many as you can instead of trying to not miss any....:cool:

BigJimP
March 23, 2009, 04:03 PM
Trust me, I understand ........ missing a low 8 is the ultimate "coughing up of a furr-ball" - but there is a saying, if you miss a target on station 7 - you buy the refreshments .....

Always remember, there are no gimmee targets on a Skeet field. Station 7 will show a fundamental flaw as fast as any other station ......

Work on your fundamentals - and if you can shoot Skeet - your wingshooting, sporting clays, etc will all improve. Keep your eye on the target - and keep us posted. None of us run as many 25's as we did years ago ( but its fun trying ..) - with a 12, 20 or 28ga and a .410 ...

dalecooper51
March 23, 2009, 07:16 PM
Thanks for the replies guys. You are both right on the money as I reminded myself of two things missing that shot. The first is not to think too much. The second is that there are no gimmes. Even though I normally hit that shot, no shots are guaranteed. That was my best round of the day. I followed up with a 20 and a 21. The wind picked up and the birds were rather lively.

It's all about fun for me. Of course it is more fun when I shoot well. I hope to run them at least once by the end of the year. Even if I don't, it's fun trying. I shoot a 3/4 oz load of number 8.5's from a 20ga wingmaster low gun. I do premount on 8, as they get right by me if I don't. I have a few other guns, but I really like shoot that 20.

I just joined the spring league at the club. I'll definitely report back.

RoscoeC
March 23, 2009, 10:04 PM
I shot my first round of clays three years ago at 56. I'm still chasing my first 25 on the skeet range. Station 8 just beats me up. Maybe I'm just not fast enough anymore, I don't know. I have shot a couple of 24's, but the the 25 still eludes me.

I took a friend for his first round of skeet a few weeks ago, and he made a really good observation. As we moved to station 8, I commented that this one always whips my butt. He said, "Of course it does, listen to what you are saying...you are telling yourself you can't do it." Well! Good point.

I'll hit it one of these days, but in the mean time, I'm having one heck of a good time trying.

The point about sporting clays is well taken. I really enjoy that too.

zippy13
March 24, 2009, 03:13 AM
My downfall was when I realized that I hadn't used my option after station 6. I thought to myself, wow you're doing pretty well. That was all it took and I choked on low 7 and then missed my option ending with a 23.

Multiply that feeling by about a thousand, or so, and you'll get an idea of what it's like to be in a tournament and realize that you are within a few targets of running a 100-straight. Ask a comp shooter, and he'll be able to you stories of shooters dropping 100-straights within just a few targets of victory. And, it's usually just as you described, stray thoughts mess up their concentration. It's quite common, and most of the better shooters have developed methods to maintain their concentration. Once you've mastered the fundamentals, Skeet becomes a head game of inches, you're continually adjusting to subtle variations. Tongue-in-cheek, it was said that a multi-time World Champion was such a great shooter because of his continual concentration -- he wasn't bright enough to have any stray thoughts.

I was fortunate to get my first tournament 100-straight during my rookie year. I'd done it in practice and come close several times only to lose because of head trips. Finally there was a tournament that was so miserably hot they were bringing ice to the Skeet fields. I was paying more attention to keeping sweat off my gun and glasses and staying hydrated than my score. I was too busy for stray thoughts and I got my 100. Most folks I've asked have the same reaction immediately after shooting their first 100-straight (or 25, 50, 75): That was easy, why didn't I do it sooner?

zippy13
March 24, 2009, 04:39 AM
Station 8 just beats me up. Maybe I'm just not fast enough anymore, I don't know.Station-8 is close to being trick shots. Once you figure them out, it's almost the easiest spot on the field. The key is foot position and determining your hold points for the high and low birds. If you don't start with your gun in the correct spot every time, you're lost. Like other stations, you have to hold below the path of the bird (or you'll lose it) and far enough out so it doesn't get past you. Trial and error is the usual way of determining your hold points.

Foot position: Station-8 legal cheat...
The majority of Skeet shooters don't take advantage of the rules when shooting station 8. Where do you put your feet when you're shooting Skeet? Watch the experienced shooters, the majority of them will shoot from the front of the box at stations 1 to 7, it puts them a yard closer to the target. But, Station-8 is different, since the target coming at you, you want to be as far away as possible to maximize your time.
Watch the experienced shooters at Station-8 and they'll stand at the back of the box, usually with their heels just touching the line. Here's where the legal cheat comes in: Pick up another foot, or more! It doesn't seem like much but it's at least 1.5% of the distance, and it makes a difference. Instead of standing in the middle, or rear portion of the high or low box, stand at the back of the box with your toes just touching the border line.
But, that's out-of-bounds, you say... Well, check the rules.

From the 2009 NSSA Skeet rule book:
SECTION III - SHOOTING PROCEDURE
A. DEFINITIONS
1. Shooting Positions
a. Shooter must stand with any part of both feet within
the boundaries of the designated shooting station. (Emphasis added)
b. Station 8 the designated shooting station is the half of
the rectangular pad most distant from the respective high or low house.
As long as your toes are in the box, you're legal!

http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/2342/station8.gif (http://img257.imageshack.us/my.php?image=station8.gif)

BigJimP
March 24, 2009, 03:11 PM
My friend Zippy makes some good points / and he shoots better than I do - so I will defer to him on most points.

While foot position is critical / your hold point is also critical. You should consider working on moving it a little ( a barrel width at a time ) - not 6" at a time. But on High 8 - you might consider moving out a little more / and up a little bit ( not much ) ..... and I'm confident Zippy would tell you the same thing - to stay in the gun as you complete the shot ( don't be in a hurry to look up ..).

Same on Low 8 - move out a little / move up a little - and change where you look for target (a little) instead of inside the dark hole ... but we are all a little bit different. Its always the little things.

A good pre shot routine - talk to yourself ... ( It's Dead, Dead Target, ( foot position, hold point ) - Dead Target, Hard Focus on leading edge, stay in gun ...) Pull ...

zippy13
March 24, 2009, 11:41 PM
BigJimP is absolutely correct about defining you hold point inches at a time. My club has masonry Skeet houses and vertical board safety fences. When talking about hold points we usually are moving up or down one block's worth or moving left or right one fence board.
If Station-8 is kicking your butt, and your club allows, shoot your 25 shots all at 8. A slight change in position may not instantly turn the targets into ink balls, but you'll know if your swing feels better. It's like getting refracted for glasses: which is better A or B? After a while, you'll get dialed into the correct position for you.

A good pre shot routine - talk to yourself ... ( It's Dead, Dead Target, ( foot position, hold point ) - Dead Target, Hard Focus on leading edge, stay in gun ...) Pull ...
A positive attitude is very important. May I add to that: Visualize the lead you want to see, shoot, see the target puff and visualize your follow through. If you can't see the lead in your mind's eye, what are you going to do with the real target?

If you're a Skeet newbie, and aren't sure about positions, hold points, and leads, there's hope. Don't waste a lot of time and money learning the basics by trial and error. There are plenty of books and videos that will give you the basic rules of thumb about positioning, hold points, and leads. Most folks settle in on points that aren't that far from the standard starting positions that have been advocated for decades.

A safety note:
For typical targets (Stations 1-7) the targets are out of bounds when they pass either 44-yard stake. At Station-8, to keep folks from wildly swinging around, the bird is out of bounds after it passes directly overhead.

RoscoeC
March 25, 2009, 07:13 AM
If Station-8 is kicking your butt, and your club allows, shoot your 25 shots all at 8.

They do, and they have the electronic controllers that can be set for a delay, so you can go out all by yourself and blast away at whatever station you wish. I have done this a couple of times, once for stations 3,4 and 5 only. I shot about 100 rounds on only those three stations. It worked. I rarely miss on those stations anymore. I shot about 25 rounds on station 8 at another session and thought I had it dialed in, but I need another session.

I am really lucky on this one, because in the summer they are open until 8:00. I can easily drop in on my way home from work and get in 50 or 75 rounds before they close.

Thanks for the sage advice, and I will be doing a couple of evening sessions on station 8 as soon as they start up their extended hours.

oneounceload
March 25, 2009, 09:28 AM
For me, high 8 is taken with my muzzle pointing at the top corner of the white on the house, about 3 feet off the window; for low 8, it is at the end of the white on the fence separating fields, about 6 feet off the window - otherwise I am always behind.

Find a hold point that works and remember where it is.

I used to hold on the corner of the opening, as I've gotten older and slower, I had to start further and further off the window

zippy13
March 25, 2009, 02:11 PM
^as I've gotten older and slower, I had to start further and further off the window.Been there, done that! :D