PDA

View Full Version : My 7 year old wants a shotgun for deer hunting.


sthrnfryedyankee
February 25, 2009, 03:52 PM
This is what he requested for his Bday and this is what id like to get him. I found a Rossi 410/22 combo but I really dont think the 410 even with slugs will be enough to hunt deer. My son is small framed and that Rossi would fit him perfectly but I seriously think a little more umph is gonna be needed, especially is we ever hunt back up north.

hogdogs
February 25, 2009, 04:20 PM
Rossi has a "tri-fecta"... .22, .223 and a 20 gauge...
Brent

rantingredneck
February 25, 2009, 04:27 PM
What he ^ said. :D.

dalecooper51
February 25, 2009, 04:51 PM
^That sounds like a good one.

A couple years ago, I got my nephew a NEF 20ga & .243 combo that works nicely for him. I'm not sure if they still offer the combo, but it might be worth a look.

hogdogs
February 25, 2009, 04:54 PM
If the NEF is still available, I would rather it as it is american made and of known quality...
Brent

rantingredneck
February 25, 2009, 05:07 PM
What they ^ said......:D.

hogdogs
February 25, 2009, 05:11 PM
Or you can opt for the Mossberg Bantam 500 20 youth size... it comes with a non-expiring discount coupon for a full size stock for later...
Brent

BigJimP
February 25, 2009, 05:22 PM
You can certainly buy him a shotgun or one of the combo's mentioned above / but letting a young man hunt deer with it - is another issue, in my opinion. I think 7 is way too young to hunt deer / regardless of what he wants - but that's your decision as a parent / not mine.

In terms of picking a gun for him / you said he's small framed - and I think that's the issue more than his age. Until he has upper body strength to point and shoulder a 7 lb gun or so with a 24 - 28" barrel / you'll have to stay with a light weight combo gun. As he develops his upper body strength - he can move up into a gague where you can get him a 7 or 7 1/2 lb gun that is adequate to kill an animal like a deer. It doesn't mean he can't come hunting with you, track, stalk, glass a hillside, etc. - and he can learn to shoot a .22 / shoot a .410 on clay targets, birds, etc - then move up into a 28ga / to a 20ga etc. - and he can start hunting deer at that point.

I sympathize - I have young grand kids - and they want to do everything at 6, 7 etc / but if they aren't strong enough to shoulder and fire at least a 7lb shotgun / in my view, hunting is out of the question. It depends on the kid - but even a big kid - needs to have the upper body strength to fire a weapon properly, work the action, make a followup shot before they have any business hunting, in my view. Some kids can do that at 9 or 10 - some can't do it until they're 15 or 16 .... just depends on the kid.

I sure would not shoot a deer, even at very close range, with a .410 / but you should consult the game laws in your state to make sure a .410 is legal for deer at all before you go down that path. The question of whether a .410 is lethal for deer / depends on the grain of the slug / distance, etc.

I encourage you to start with a comb gun / get him some practice - and work it out from there.

jjwestbrook
February 25, 2009, 05:33 PM
my son has the rossi combo. bought it for his 8th birthday , he practiced with the .22 barrel then this past season at 9 yrs old he shot a deer the first time he carried it to the deer stand. he used the .243 barrel for the deer.

perazzimx14
February 25, 2009, 05:37 PM
.410 shotguns are for expert shooters not beginners. If you want to discourage a young shooter give them a sub-gauge gun. Yes the recoil is less but so is the shot mass. Jim is right if he cannot handle a bigger gun let some time pass. If he desires to shoot get a .22 and start him on a bench shooting open sights.

hogdogs
February 25, 2009, 05:53 PM
Perrazzi, I kinda-sorta agree...
with a day or 10 of red ryder shooting my only projectile emissions aside from bow and "arra" before moving on to a Mossberg .410 bolt gun... No one told me it was a pro's round. They did however explain the lead for runnin/flyin game and some other principles... I proceeded to go knockin squirrels from the trees and pheasant from the fence rows and air.
Rabbits were too easy...
It was explained when I would miss that I was doing very well and perfection was not to be expected from a new shooter especially a kid way under 10...
By 12 I was getting 2 shots off at birds and bunnies as fast (or nearly so) as buddies with pumps. I was far more lethal than my friends and could easily smoke my bestest bud who had a real nice pretty Remington or possibly browning auto loader...
I feel that the .410 bolt action made me really work my tail off and I never had a clue how much I was growing into a formidable shooter/hunter due to it.
All I can say is "THANKS DAD" for not getting me a 20 gauge first...
Brent

BigJimP
February 25, 2009, 06:33 PM
You guys are right - a .410 can make even an experienced shooter talk to themselves a little. I try to tell myself, shoot it like its a 12ga - but if I miss a Skeet target, it creeps into my brain a little - and the .410 pattern means you chip a lot more targets than you bust into dust balls - its the nature of the .410 pattern.

Balistically, a 28ga with 3/4 oz loads gives a really good pattern for a young or new shooter. I say new shooters - because I really don't differentiate based on sex or age - some young adults, especially young ladies, don't have a lot of upper body strength either - so you have to adapt and you have to manage and reduce the recoil to an absolute minimum for all new shooters.

In my family, we started hunting pretty young / but most of the boys in my family were 6'0" tall and weighed 150 lbs by the time they were 10 ... so shooting even a 12 ga with light loads at 11 or 12 wasn't a big deal to us / or hunting with 30-40's or 30-06's, etc at a pretty young age.

But even for big kids, I still started them out slow - I work with the grandkids on some .22's / and then move them into a 28ga when they're strong enough / or to a semi-auto in 20ga ( and I stay with real light loads ). Young kids are more mature for their age these days - so that's a plus / but you still need to spend some time on all this stuff.

The other issue on kids - they grow so fast - that getting them their own guns / vs having guns you own for them to shoot - is probably a better idea until they get older. When the kids and grandkids in my family turn 16, its been my practice to buy them a Browning 12ga pump shotgun / let them get some pride of ownership, take care of it, etc ( and keep it locked in their Dad's safe ). For the other guns - like a youth sized 20ga semi-auto, a .410 , a 28ga, a full sized 20ga semi-auto, etc - those remain my guns - and all the grandkids shoot them as they move up thru the years. I think it works out a lot better - than buying them guns they outgrow in a few years.

Rmart30
February 25, 2009, 08:21 PM
Id probably agree with waiting a cpl of years for hunting. My choice would be for mine a 870 20 guage combo with field barrel and the rifled barrel.

Tatsumi67
February 25, 2009, 08:31 PM
Go with the Rossi one or an H&R single barrel.

but then again you want a gun he can grow into. my first shotgun was a 20 gauge pump soo......

go with the Rossi.

rebelboxer
February 25, 2009, 08:52 PM
Had BB guns for "plinkin" at 8 yrs. Dad got me my first single shot 20g at 10. Never shot it but off we go dove hunting. He sat me down at a waterin hole and went off to the other side of the field (way off). Less than 5 minutes and about 20 birds lit straight above me in a dead oak. Sweat porin, I just sit the butt in the ground and fired straight up. Went back to "plinkin"..... Too much, too early, too dang loud.... LOL

pinetree
February 25, 2009, 08:57 PM
An NEF/H&R 243 works well. Cousins boy started with one at about that age. So did his sister.

ammo.crafter
February 26, 2009, 12:26 AM
a compact lever action Marlin or Winchester in .44mag will be a lot easier to handle.;)

sthrnfryedyankee
February 26, 2009, 06:58 AM
Lots of interesting points and advice. I have guns that he could grow into. I just know he wanted something that he could hunt with this upcoming season. Some of the stands I hunt from have shooting rests that could help him get settled in and there will be plenty of range time in between. Its still up in the air and I appreciate all the responses.

srt 10 jimbo
February 26, 2009, 08:38 AM
:)My first Shotgun was a savage .412/22lr over and under. got pretty good with it too, was able to knock barn swallows outta the air when I was 8-12. by the time I got a 12 gauge, I thought it was cheating. Let the boy start off on a .410 I say. If he gets pretty good with that , he's gonna be great when he gets a 20 or 12

bugs
February 27, 2009, 01:20 PM
I don't want to rain on the parade - but IMHO 10 is too young to be handling a shotgun, much less 7. But then I probably have a different perspective on this. A boyhood buddy was killed may years ago when his 10 year-old son fell over backwards with a shotgun and it discharged into my buddy's chest. It happens. Its free advice - but maybe worth something.

6x6pinz
February 27, 2009, 04:15 PM
I bought my son the Rossi 410/22 for hunting small game. Worked out well but it only took a year or so and I was back out buying him a 20 youth model. While I love the 410 for its challenges you would be better served getting into a 20 to start. The choice as to when to start hunting big game is yours but IMHO I would wait until he could handle a firearm large enough to get the job done effectively with a marginal shot placement. The 410's are great but require accurate shot placements that a yound hunter is more than likely not able to make.
Remeber it is the first experiences that will set the tone for the rest of his life, so make them enjoyable.

mwar410
February 28, 2009, 01:36 PM
I recently purchased the rossi tri-fecta, for $220 it is suprisingly good. The stock has an adjustable comb, this is a feature that you don't normally see in a youth model. It has a 20 ga. barrel, which in my opinion is the best youth ga. for the fact that all ammo is readily avail.. Try to find non-tox shot in 410 or 28 ga. The 243 barrel barks, but doesn't seem to bite. and who doesn't love to shoot 22. now the boy can shoot one gun, for everything. and his shooting has really improved , shot his deer at 60yds off hand, just behind the shoulder.

roy reali
February 28, 2009, 07:46 PM
I know that Nevada and California have a minimum age for big game hunting. It is over seven. Birand small game hunting is another story.

beetlefang
February 28, 2009, 10:08 PM
My son wanted something that could kill a deer when he was 7 too.

We got him a cz .22 youth model rifle for christmas and put a 1x scope on it.

When he opened it up he said, "Can it kill a deer?"

I told him,"no."

He said, "What if I shoot it in the eye?"

I said, "Yeah, ok, if you shoot the deer in the eye then you'll kill it with your .22." He was happy.

He killed quite a few cans, but no deer.

When he was nine we got him a BPS in 28 gauge and had a youth stock placed on it. He killed his first duck when he was 10 (using my old beretta 12 gauge auto).

He's 13 now and really just growing into his guns. Now his .22 sports a leupold variable rimfire scope. He was really happy that he had his 'own' even if they are kept in my safe.

Big Bill
February 28, 2009, 10:17 PM
Thank goodness no 7 YO can hunt deer here in Idaho. Under special circumstances they can hunt if they are 11 YO and their birthday comes right after hunting season before the end of the year.

SwampYankee
February 28, 2009, 10:18 PM
You would not let a 7 year old drive a car, would ya? 7 is way to young for any type of firearm, especially for a small kid. It's just not smart, in my opinion. A firearm simply requires the good judgment and responsible behavior that no 7 year old has yet obtained. I have 4 kids, there i no way mine are touching a loaded firearm until they are 12. My dad bought me a Beretta Model 70 when I was 9. Obviously, he only let me use it when he was standing next to me, but it was not necessarily his best move.

roy reali
February 28, 2009, 10:44 PM
My three year old grandson wants to drive a car. What model should I get him? He very mature for his age!:D

woodland
March 1, 2009, 07:59 PM
Big Bill
Thank goodness no 7 YO can hunt deer here in Idaho. Under special circumstances they can hunt if they are 11 YO and their birthday comes right after hunting season before the end of the year.


SwampYankee:
You would not let a 7 year old drive a car, would ya? 7 is way to young for any type of firearm, especially for a small kid. It's just not smart, in my opinion. A firearm simply requires the good judgment and responsible behavior that no 7 year old has yet obtained. I have 4 kids, there i no way mine are touching a loaded firearm until they are 12. My dad bought me a Beretta Model 70 when I was 9. Obviously, he only let me use it when he was standing next to me, but it was not necessarily his best move.

I am sorry, but I would have to respectfully disagree with this sentiment. My boys have been shooting a Henry Mini Bolt .22 since they were 5. No, I did not hand it to them and send off to have a good time. It is under close supervision, and serious teaching. Before they could touch it they had to learn and be able to recite the 4 rules by heart. They did, and still can.

Last fall, at the ages of 7 and 9, they both took Washington's 8 hour Hunter Education course over 4 days. They spent hours in their room reading the manuel and studying before each class. I think the test is 75 questions, and they both passed on their own. The instructor of the class commented to me that he was highly impressed with how serious they took the class and with their handling of real guns during practical exercises. Especially compared to some of the teens that were there. I bought them a Mossberg youth .243 and they both got their first deer. No, I did not send them off into the woods alone. And, they both helped to skin and gut their own deer.

Are all children able to handle guns that young? No, not at all. But if they are able to take it seriously, and have the interest, then there is nothing wrong with young children shooting guns. I can guarantee you my children have more respect for what a firearm can do than any child who is not allowed near guns. They do not play with toy guns, and they know the reality of what a bullet can do to a living creature. I would trust them with a gun before many of the people I see at the range.

Saying that children that young should not handle guns is too blanket of a statement. Some can and some can not. Much of it depends on the parents and environment. With a propper upbringing it is not a problem, and I believe could reduce the number of child related "accidents" involving firearms.

JMHO

roy reali
March 1, 2009, 08:39 PM
First off, there are minimum ages for big game hunting in some states. I have to agree with you that some children are more mature then others and could probably handle the responsibility of shooting a centerfire rifle. But you could also say that some 12 years are bright and safe enough to operate a motor vehicle, but I don't think there is a state that would issue a 12 year old a driver's license. Bars won't serve 15 year olds drinks even though some 15 year olds might be able to handle booze better then some 25 year olds. The reason for minimum ages in some activities is because most children do not have the maturity to handle them.

lipadj46
March 1, 2009, 09:50 PM
My three year old grandson wants to drive a car. What model should I get him? He very mature for his age!

Yeah and my 18 month old wants cookies for breakfast, she will even go get the box of Oreos out of the cupboard for me :D

I was shooting from a young age but I remember a time where I almost got shot while my dad was clearing a jam from a .22. The gun was point to the ground in a safe direction but I was a kid and just bopping around like a kid does and they were heads down with the rifle. I remember just about running in front of the muzzle and the gun going off. It was probably 6 inches from my leg. I was probably 8 at the time and was a smart kid but stuff happens.

I know people do let there very young children hunt but me personally I plan on taking it slow with my daughter. The last accident I heard of was the 9 year old that shot himself in the head with an Uzi while his dad and an instructor stood behind him. I assume that father is in his own personal hell and we should take note of that incident.

roy reali
March 1, 2009, 09:57 PM
The first gun I was allowed to hunt with was a scattergun. At short range, any shotgun load will cause great harm to its target. But with small birdshot, someone standing at a hundred yards away isn't going to be killed be a careless shot. At that range even a rimfire rifle is lethal. My dad figured that if I screwed up, a shotgun was more a more forgiving weapon. Now, my dad wouldn't have been so forgiving if I ever shot at something that I should not have.

I do think that a shotgun, firing small birdshot, is the smartest way to start a kid on hunting.

Big Bill
March 1, 2009, 10:55 PM
Woodland - great explanation. Keep up the good work. I guess it just suprises me that a liberal state like Washington allows kids that young to hunt.

woodland
March 2, 2009, 12:26 PM
First off, there are minimum ages for big game hunting in some states. I have to agree with you that some children are more mature then others and could probably handle the responsibility of shooting a centerfire rifle. But you could also say that some 12 years are bright and safe enough to operate a motor vehicle, but I don't think there is a state that would issue a 12 year old a driver's license. Bars won't serve 15 year olds drinks even though some 15 year olds might be able to handle booze better then some 25 year olds. The reason for minimum ages in some activities is because most children do not have the maturity to handle them.

Yes, I understand each state has different rules. Here in Washington there is no stated age limit, the only requirement is you have to pass the hunter education course to get a license. But when it comes to kids with guns out in the woods, state law does say you have to be a minimum of 14 to be alone with a rifle. So there are restrictions. As for the driver's license analogy, no, they don't give 12 year olds licenses. You can get one at 16, but it has restrictions on it.

I guess to me, it comes down to responsibility. I am old fashioned enough to feel that people should be responsible for their own actions, and that parents should be responsible for their children. The reason we have laws saying "no one under age XX can hunt" is because parents are no longer responsible for their children. They just hold up their arms and say "I can't control them!" So, the government creeps in and takes a little more control. If you say your 7 year old is not ready to hunt, then that is you taking responsibility. He is your son, and you know him. When you feel he is ready I am sure you will take him. Before I took my sons hunting I told them they had to pass the test all on their own. And if they did, then they had to pass my tests. I took them out with their rifle and they practiced. If I was not sure that they could hit the vital zone within 80 yards, they would not be going. They both worked hard, and it paid off for them. I truly believe it is the parents that should be able to make those decisions. Not the government with a law that blankets everyone.

Back to the car analogy, when my kids are 16, if I don't feel they are ready and capable to drive alone, there is no way they will be getting a license. I will be responsible for them, and I will control when they "hit the streets."

SwampYankee
March 2, 2009, 04:27 PM
All it takes is for that 7, 9, or 11 year old to forget how deadly the weapon they are holding is. It happens all the time with adults who SHOULD know better. My 5 year olds favorite words are "I forgot". My 7 year old isn't much better. Perhaps there is a 7 year old mature and intelligent enough to remember that he/she is holding a lethal weapon, to never point it indiscriminately, to always consider it loaded and to deal intelligently with misfires and other problems that might crop up. But I don't feel like getting shot because my kid forgot the gun was loaded or thought it was empty. And nevermind the mental scars from accidentally shooting dad.

I think shooting is a fun sport and lots of fun sharing with your kids and family. I loved it when my father used to take us out to the sand pits and fire up the M60 (no kidding). But I simply do not feel comfortable with small children (under 12ish) shooting, or hunting. Hell, when I was a kid I knew plenty of 18 year olds that couldn't handle it.

hogdogs
March 2, 2009, 05:00 PM
If gun safety begins with the toy guns it is easier to work in the real McCoy...
Yeah I played cops and robbers and cowboys and injuns but also knew it was off limits to point at any critter not involved directly with the play.
But to tackle or otherwise harass unsuspecting grown ups was fair game:rolleyes:
Did I just admit to being a little devious monster:o
Brent

roy reali
March 2, 2009, 07:14 PM
http://www.ncsl.org/programs/natres/minagehunt.htm

Check out the age requirements in the different states for hunting. They seem to be all over the place. I guess kids in some states are more mature then in other states of their parents are more responsible.

CarbineCaleb
March 2, 2009, 07:31 PM
Personally, I wouldn't even consider it. He can always get one when he is older, more coordinated, and more importantly, has better mental focus, discipline and appreciation of the gravity of handling a gun and the significance of mortality.

It may be fine, but then again, it may not. And if something happens, you can't undo what's been done.

chadwick76
March 2, 2009, 11:21 PM
at 7 i had a single shot 410, but i could hit a paper plate at roughly 100yds. at that time that prove to my dad i could kill a deer, but i was much older when i finally did. i do believe the 410, if hits vital organs will do the job. But if not dad, thats what you are their for with your 12 gauge (called "riding shotgun"). stick with the 410, then 20 gauge etc. good luck.

Scubasimmons
March 3, 2009, 05:55 PM
I started hunting at age 12 (deer with a .270). Since that time I have been in the woods at hunting camp with a lot of kids and I have yet to find one under the age of 10 that is responsible 100% of the time. The part that kids fail to realize (I remember being reminded of this on more than one occasion) is that a kid with their rifle on their shoulder is ready to shoot an adult in the chin.

Also in WA I believe they are revising the hunting alone age law because of the recent accident where a 14 yo shot and killed a hiker.

However I don't see any issues taking the kids out to do some shooting. I may not have started hunting until age 12 but at age 5 the firearm training (home) began. Got a Red Ryder BB gun to practice the rules and occasionallt went out and shot the .22 and 20 ga.

Crow61
March 3, 2009, 07:03 PM
I have been shooting/hunting since I was probably no more than 7 or 8. As long as you supervise the child and stay with him in the woods there is nothing wrong with it.

I would not go with a shotgun for such a small child. A H&R of NEF single-shot .243 rifle would probably not recoil any more than a .410 and definately less than a 20 guage.

Get those little guys out there as early as possible! Just stay with them and teach them gun safety. It will be okay!!!!!!!!

chadwick76
March 3, 2009, 11:39 PM
remember guys, his state might require him to hunt with a shotgun. My state )indiana) requires that to hunt whitetail (excluding muzzloaders),with a shotgun. i've been told by d.n.r. that ,"our state is too flat to shoot high-power'. so that's why we have to use shotguns. funny though, i beleive michigan can use high-power rifles, and they are flatter than us. oh well, my hasting barrel, combined with my 870 wingmaster, leuopold scope, and (very) expensive slugs, i group very well at 100-150 yds. however, i do believe with my current setup, i could smoke a deer at over that!

bugs
March 4, 2009, 10:35 AM
I started hunting at age 12 (deer with a .270). Since that time I have been in the woods at hunting camp with a lot of kids and I have yet to find one under the age of 10 that is responsible 100% of the time. The part that kids fail to realize (I remember being reminded of this on more than one occasion) is that a kid with their rifle on their shoulder is ready to shoot an adult in the chin.

That one made me smile. As a former scout leader, I think kids under 10 are probably responsible about 10% of the time. But what is not understood by many parents, but is well understood by middle school teachers and scout leaders, is the irresponsibility seems to peak at about age 13. The 13 YO is old enough to know better, he just doesn't care, and in many cases wears the badge of irresponsibility with pride.

And when one of my friends would allow his kid to tag along on a hunt carrying a 22 or BB gun, it was not long before I would find myself looking down the barrel.

One more piece of free advice - a single-shot, lever action, or pump action is MUCH safer in the hands of a kid than a semi-auto, especially in the field where it is easy to get distracted.

beetlefang
March 5, 2009, 02:44 AM
Ummm...I think alot of nay sayers are missing the point.

I imagine that the original poster...like myself...isn't giving his 7 year old a rifle/shotgun and letting him go hunting or tag along with his own gun.

My kids...now 13 and 16 are alway supervised when it comes to handling guns.

They have their own .22's and shotguns. But they are locked in my safe. Whether we are plinking or hunting, there is only one gun involved. We are basically shooting it together, me acting like a range coach and him shooting the gun.

It's the same with bb guns too.

It's fun; basically father son expeditions.

Now fishing on the other hand...it's everyone for themselves. When the spanish and blue fish are running, you have to tie your own knots. Still, the youngest usually outfishes me no matter how often I 'accidently' cut him off. ;)

TxGun
March 5, 2009, 02:53 AM
If he wants to learn to shoot, and he seems mature enough, I'd do it. But it would be a single-shot .22 or .410, and I would always be right with him when he was shooting. I would give him a couple of years of very close shooting and safety instruction. At 9 or so, if he seemed ready skill-wise and maturity-wise, I would take him hunting. I shot my first deer at 9. But I had been accompanying my Dad and Granddad on deer hunts from age 6. Many days each season. And I had shot many hundreds, probably thousands, of .22 rounds by age 9. I could shoot and I was safe. But those were different times.

srt 10 jimbo
March 5, 2009, 06:58 AM
Had my own 22 when I was 8, and a savage .410/22 over under by the time I was 10. But grew up on farm.:)

Crow61
March 5, 2009, 02:16 PM
Taking a child hunting is one of the best things that a parent can do. That is, IF that parent is responsible and makes sure he/she teaches the child proper gun safety.

A lot of us older folks grew up in different times. I got my first .22 at a very early age. My dad built a gun rack for me and it hung beside my bed with my rifle on it. That was a common thing back then. We didn't have a gun cabinet and had never heard of a gun safe.

Most of my friends owned guns and the kept them the same way.

The problem today is that parents are not involved in their children's lives.

Buy your child a gun. Teach them gun safety. Take them hunting/shooting. Make it a fun and safe experience.

"Take your kid hunting instead of hunting for your kid".

bugs
March 5, 2009, 07:38 PM
The problem today is that parents are not involved in their children's lives.

That's been a problem for a while now - and its true vise-versa. I think it is mostly a result of the transition from a farming/rural nation to an industrial/urban nation. T. Jefferson had some opinions about that - and I suspect he was right. We cannot go back - and it changes the basic fabic of the nation in many ways - all bad.

joshwr
March 20, 2009, 08:54 PM
My first gun was the rossi .410/22, and it is a great gun. My dad got it for me when i was 12, and its a great gun for a small framed kid. Overall the quality was good, but we did run into some problems with it after a while, and I have found some posts where ppl encountered the same problem. first the sights on the 22 are plastic, and just the slightest bump knocks them off, but when set the gun shoots straight as an arrow. secondly, the hammer spring actually broke inside the gun, and because It is a single chunk of Iron with the only access to the inside of the gun being through the trigger, its almost impossible to fix, and even harder to put back together with those pesky pins that you have to reinsert.

despite these breaks I do think this is an overall good firearm to start on, its just not designed for the rugged use that my dad and I gave it out here on the farm, or for long term use( it became my younger brothers after me, then a hd gun, so after 6 years it broke)

I would have some other recommends, but I have grown up with a gun of some sort in my hand since I was old enough to pick up a pistol and know which end to point, so my taste in firearms for starting is probably a bit big that was just the first gun that was mine.

hogdogs
March 20, 2009, 09:04 PM
You wouldn't let a 7 year old drive?
Man I got an old S-10 stick v-6 for just such kids... Phone books and 2X4 for pedal extensions and LET 'EM ROOT! Heck a 2 year old is fine driving so long as they avoid the house, barn and well head! And I guess i want them to steer clear of the "dog yard" too...
Brent

TxGun
March 20, 2009, 09:41 PM
Some of you folks seem to have this vision of turning a 7, 8, or 9 YO youngster/new shooter loose in the field with a gun. Of course no one is seriously advocating that. :rolleyes: Adult supervision means ADULT supervision. That means: if there is a problem, it's on you, the adult. YOU have the responsibility. If you don't feel qualified to supervise a young shooter, then that's fine. It's understandable. But others do feel qualified. The gun never gets touched unless the parent is right there, hands on child and hands on gun. There are certainly many who provide gun training to their kids at an early age and do it successfully. There are also those who muck it up. You have to know your (and your child's) limitations.

hogdogs
March 20, 2009, 09:59 PM
TxGun... Spot on! Give yerself a pat on the back for saying what I could not figger out how to say!
Brent

lipadj46
March 20, 2009, 11:22 PM
I think we all understand that, but man 7 is just really young. I think of that poor kid who shot himself in the head with an Uzi with his dad and an instructor standing just feet away from him.

Just for grins I asked my mother who has been a kindergarten / 1st grade teacher for going on 25 years if she ever had a student that she thought was mature enough to handle a shotgun and hunting and she said no never. Mind you she is pro hunting and let me grow up around firearms and hunting. Just thought she would have good perspective that none of us have.

hogdogs
March 20, 2009, 11:27 PM
I was told at 6 what gun to grab to protect my sisters from a bad person. I have been shooting routinely since 7-8 and had OPEN permission to hunt safely at 10 with other safe kids. I didn't need permission. just leave momma a note of where I was hunting and who with... and I better be home before dark or the wooden spoon would rewind my clock!:eek:
Brent

tjtim
March 21, 2009, 10:05 AM
Well Hmmmm. I agree with most of what everyone said as far as chosing the correct size and weight that he can safely handle, but must also consider he is growing and don't want him to out grow it too quikly. I started my son out with a simple daisy bb-gun teaching him respect and saftey, both for himself and others, as well as how to care fore, clean etc. at about age 7, mid way age 8 I then got him into a higher grade pellet only C02 rifle, then at age 9 on his B-day got him a Savage .22lr this was his first real firing weapon which he learned to target shoot as well as shoot small game with, by this time he already new of the respect and safty concerns as well as developed the body strength to hold and fire something with minimal recoil, at age 10 I got a youth style 20 gauge shot gun for him and he did not fire this shot gun til about age 12 and that was his choice not mine, he just was not ready for the recoil, I think it kind of scarred him but one day he asked if he go out with me and try it out, and we did, it is a great memory for both of us. he is now 21 years old and probably has a nicer collection of arms than I ever thought of having, and he also works with the mentored youth program teaching safe hunting practices and fire arms safety. It's all in bringing them up at a leavel in which they can handle at the rate they are growing, so that they both mentally and physically can handle the respect and saftey of it all, mix it up and or start out too soon or too late can turn them away from the sport very easy.

mrray13
March 21, 2009, 10:37 AM
wow...i could type up a huge reply, but i think woodland nailed it pretty damn good. TxGun even said it as well....it's on the parent's, plain and simple.no getting over it or around it.


in my case, my son has owned his own firearms since about 6, a marlin modle 60 .22lr. and it's gone downhill ever since, at 15 he owns that same marlin, a yugo sks, a mk44 (i think) mosin-nagant, a remington model 11 and a s&w model 27. early on the training started and it goes on to this day. we shoot together all the time, even get the wifey out to play. safety is always number one on the list, and yes, he knows where the loaded guns are in case i'm not home.


too many folks want others to take the responsiblity for their kids and then cry when they won't. and when that happens, they just give the kid ridilan (spelling?).



anyway...i like the mossberg 20g youth/bantam model. with mild loads, recoil isn't bad, it is easy to grow into as full size stocks will fit it and it's an inexpensive way to get the child out and shoot.