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chaz12
February 17, 2009, 06:01 PM
I have not shot BP before, but I have always loved the looks of the Colt 1851 Navy. I looked at the various brands and prices online and decided to order a Pietta model from Cabella's.

After getting it, I don't see how a Uberti or Cimarron could look any better. The fit and finish on this one is as good as you could want. Cylinder turns smooth and positive, trigger is smooth and fairly light. I am well satisfied.

I don't know if I will ever actually shoot it and to be fair, maybe the other more expensive pistols do shoot better.

I do like this one though.

Chaz

Raider2000
February 17, 2009, 06:10 PM
Congrats Chaz on your purchase, don't be affraid to shoot your new revolver because with simple soapy water clean up & then a little oil will make it still look like new.

Which one did ya get?
Brass Framed or Steel Framed?
.36 caliber or .44 caliber?

Chris_B
February 17, 2009, 06:31 PM
Shoot the thing! :D

resist the temptation to spin the cylinder

Fingers McGee
February 17, 2009, 07:33 PM
Read this:
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=207029

Then go out and have fun with it. Pretty soon you'll want to pair it up; then get another pair, then another, then another, then another ......................

Doc Hoy
February 17, 2009, 08:22 PM
Chaz,

I do agree with you regarding the design of the 1851 Navy. I know this is a personal preference thing and many of the experts may take issue, but I think it is the prettiest pistol ever designed.

It was the first pistol I ever owned in about 1973, a purchase in kit form through "Shotgun News" at $54.00 (Steel frame) It was all steel and shined up like a ruby in a goats a__ __.

Ahhh the good old days.

Of course, back then I was still married to my thankfully X wife.

Ahhh the bad old days.

Smokin_Gun
February 17, 2009, 11:34 PM
Congrads Chaz, well done...the Navy is a Kind of it's own, fast to draw, well balanced and easy to hold... Shoot it man ya gotta! :O)

SG

Doc Hoy
February 21, 2009, 08:35 PM
For Chaz and others who may be interested,

I received my 1851 Navy round barrel in brass frame. Sale was on (154.99 and 5 bucks shipping from Cabella's) Couldn't pass it up.

I like the fit and look of this Pietta. The finish is nice and smooth. When I first got it (Wednesday) two of the chambers did not lock up solid. A little wiggling was all that was required to get them to turn in full cock. That seems to have worked its way out and now all the chambers lock pretty good.

I could be happier with the finish on the trigger guard but it will be fun polishing that up.

The bolt seems NOT to be dragging the cylinder. The top surface of the bolt drops down below the surface of the frame at the bolt slot at half cock. This is reassuring.

I have measured the bold thickness in comparison with the cylinder notch as recommended in the Pettifogger article. No problem there.

I had to drive the wedge out with an aluminum punch. Pretty standard I guess.

I am going to shoot this pistol but probably not all that much. I don't mind the brass frame for that reason. In fact I am partial to the way they shine up.

kirpi97
February 21, 2009, 09:21 PM
Chaz,

Shoot it. I own an 1851 Navy .44 cal and I love it. It has to be my favorite revolver. It was born to shoot. You can buy a Remmy to sit on the coffee table.:D:D:D

(Only joking about the Remington sitting on the coffee table.)

simonkenton
February 26, 2009, 03:23 PM
It is a beautiful pistol.
It was also the first gun I ever owned, bought a .36 from a high school buddy in 1967. He got it from Dixie Gun Works.

Hawg
February 26, 2009, 06:15 PM
I received my 1851 Navy round barrel in brass frame.

That's a Griswold and Gunnison.

The bolt seems NOT to be dragging the cylinder. The top surface of the bolt drops down below the surface of the frame at the bolt slot at half cock. This is reassuring.

Never let the hammer down from half cock. Fully cock it then let it down. if you let it down from half cock you will get drag marks on the cylinder.


I had to drive the wedge out with an aluminum punch.

After you remove it a few times it will get easier.