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tacweapon
January 23, 2009, 06:01 AM
I am wondering drills does everyone do when they are at the range ? I have taken a carbine class and was wondering what type of drills do you all do when you are at the range to make sure that you keep you skill level up ?

If any one has any suggestions on what drills you practice or would be helpful for other people to practice please post them here, whether it is for pistol, carbine, or long range rifle. Please be descriptive and if you have any post videos or pictures of things being done the proper way

Thanks in advance

Double Naught Spy
January 23, 2009, 06:20 AM
Given that you are new, have you tried using the search button (top center-right control bar location) to see what has been posted previously such as this thread with this very informative link...
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=263025&highlight=todd+jarrett

or threads where people discuss drills in particular?

Have you checked out your options on YouTube where folks post their practice sessions and drills?

tacweapon
January 23, 2009, 06:27 AM
Given that you are new, have you tried using the search button (top center-right control bar location) to see what has been posted previously such as this thread with this very informative link...
http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/...t=todd+jarrett

or threads where people discuss drills in particular?

Have you checked out your options on YouTube where folks post their practice sessions and drills?

I have watched the videos of Todd Jarret before and they are very informative. I like watching them when I am home doing dry fire practice. The range I use is very remote so I cant watch anything when I go there.

I was not able to use the search button because for some reason my work computer is very picky about what it lets me do.

I have watched the videos on youtube also and while some of them are informative most of them are not, most of them are of people that are doing a lot of stupid stuff with firearms.

Sneezer
January 23, 2009, 06:33 AM
The gunnsite training center has some good videos, check you tube for idpa matches, start watching self-defense tv on the out door channel. Someone close to you probaly teaches a home defense course etc.

Slopemeno
January 23, 2009, 09:34 AM
Personally, I think that one-shot-draw-and-fire, while incredibly boring after a while, is probably one of the best skill builders. I took a clinic back in the 1980's, and the instructor would just grind along for hours doing those, but for me it really paid off.

The way the instructor staged it was to have the class all shooting at fixed
9" steel plates, and YOU were responsible for reloading as needed. The instructor would give random blasts on his whistle, and you had to respond with a shot from the leather. It really forced you to work hard on finding and using that front sight.

If that's too dry, five poppers or plates is fun, and you get some immediate feedback.

The Great Mahoo
January 23, 2009, 10:50 AM
Personally, I think that one-shot-draw-and-fire, while incredibly boring after a while, is probably one of the best skill builders I'll have to try doing more of these; they sound like a great exercise. Grinding the basics is almost always very bennificial.

bufordtjustice
January 23, 2009, 10:57 AM
For me, there are always a few simple drills I come back to almost every time I shoot. Doing combat reloads, immediate action drills with dummy rounds and transitions to secondary weapons are key ones. You don't have to launch a lot of rounds downrange to do good training.

On the flip side though, make sure that every time you pick up the rifle doesn't end with only one or two shots being fired. Eventually, you may think that is all a magazine holds. lol. I have been on the range and see people doing multiple target drills that lower their rifle after a couple of rounds and then reengage. Talk about a heck of a training scar.

bufordtjustice
January 23, 2009, 11:00 AM
Sorry, but I forgot to add, try to start off slow, do some grouping drills, etc. and then pick up the pace. Keep a small notebook and put your observations in it both good and about about your ammo, stance, groups, etc. The drill of single shots is probably the best overall starting drill I can think of besides a drill reconfirming zero.

Double Naught Spy
January 23, 2009, 12:33 PM
I was not able to use the search button because for some reason my work computer is very picky about what it lets me do.

What?? So you can use other buttons to post a thread and to post a reply, but not use the search button? Come on!

Sneezer
January 23, 2009, 04:17 PM
What?? So you can use other buttons to post a thread and to post a reply, but not use the search button? Come on!

It's hard to learn with ******* contests going on all around. If you don't want to answer the questions the consider yourself totally educated and move on. You made your point so go kick your dog or something.

444
January 23, 2009, 04:50 PM
Here are a few links with drills and various courses of fire. Don't get hung up on the name or it's original purpose. If it says it is for handguns, there is no reason in the world why you can't shoot the same course of fire with a carbine or a shotgun. Don't forget that you can make up your own drills using these as ideas. You can mix and match parts of them and morph them into new drills. For some of the more involved IDPA drills you can set them up and shoot them with a carbine, or you can set up part of it.
Set up these drills with snap caps or dummy rounds inserted randomly in your magazines so you have to do malfunction clearances. Shoot these drills further or closer than they were intended; do an El Presidente' at 100 yards with a carbine or rifle for example. Do an El Presidente' at the standard range with a shotgun, only have another target at 50 yards that you have to switch to slug to engage all on the timer.....................

Use your imagination and do a lot of dry firing.



http://www.personaldefensetraining.com/showpage.php?target=dryfire.php

http://www.rangemaster.com/ Click on the dry fire section which is listed on the left

http://www.kuci.uci.edu/~dany/firearms/drills.html

http://www.state.nj.us/lps/dcj/agguide/firearms.htm

http://www.stageexchange.com/

http://www.tacticalshooters.com/COF/index_page.htm

http://www.personaldefensetraining.com/images/meu_soc.pdf


For those looking for carbine instruction without attending a formal class, here is a terrific set of DVDs . I bought them and they are terrific (FWIW I have taken several formal carbine courses): http://www.amazon.com/Art-Tactical-Carbine/dp/B001JEQPKK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1232747384&sr=8-1