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arcticap
January 11, 2009, 11:55 PM
It's a Derringer that shoots .177 round balls and pellets.
At Cabela's:

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/standard-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat20712-cat20817&rid=&indexId=cat20817&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=1&parentType=index&parentId=cat20817&id=0065767

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/content/Pod/06/57/67/p065767sq01.jpg

Some folks have may have questions about the relative strength of #209 primers vs. the standard #11 percussion caps that most other parlor pistols use.

On page 83 of DaveEhrig's book "Muzzleloading for Deer & Turkey", he lists some information on percussion caps and primers.

#11 standard cap - 6.53 cc of gas at 3,024 degrees F when fired.
#11 magnum cap - 7.59 cc of gas at 3,717 degrees F when fired.
U.S. #2 musket cap - 14.36 cc of gas at 3,717 degrees F when fired.
#209 shotgun primer - 21.98 cc of gas at 3,024 degrees F when fired.
#200 rifle primer - 11.68 cc of gas at 3,024 degrees F when fired.


And Toby Bridges came up with another method to measure the relative strength of different brands of 209 primers by shooting a patched .32 ball out of an inline without any powder at all, and he then chronographed the average velocity of 3 shots of each. It illustrates that even 209 primers are not all the same:


http://www.Hpmuzzleloading.com/technical3.html

With a variety of the primers, I headed for the range with the Green Mountain .32 in-line rifle and my chronograph. I started by snapping a couple of primers to get a little base fouling in the bore. Then I wiped the bore with four clean dry patches, exactly how I would wipe the bore between each and every shot. I figured this would give me the same amount of resistance for each and every primer popped behind the well greased patch and light ball. And for each primer tested, I fired 5 shots across the chronograph, then eliminated the highest and lowest velocity readings. The velocities of the remaining three shots were then averaged. And here are the velocities that were recorded for the following No. 209 primers...including the new "Muzzleloading Primers".

Winchester 209ML ........................221 f.p.s.
Winchester 209 Triple Seven ML.....244 f.p.s.
Remington 209 Kleanbore ML ........318 f.p.s.
Std. Winchester No. 209A ..............336 f.p.s.
Std. Remington No. 209 .................341 f.p.s.
Cheddite No. 209 ...........................347 f.p.s.
Federal No. 209A ...........................381 f.p.s.
And for comparison, we also ran the Precision Rifle "Vari-Flame" through this test, using both Winchester "Small Pistol" and "Small Rifle" primers.
Winchester WSP "Small Pistol" ........116 f.p.s.
Winchester WSR "Small Rifle" .........143 f.p.s.

The average weight of a .177 pistol pellet is about 7.7 grains while a .32 round ball weighs about 49 grains. So the velocity of an airgun pellet should be considerably higher then those listed above. But there will also be some velocity lost due to the Pedersoli's shorter barrel.

choppergreg74
January 12, 2009, 12:40 AM
Verry cool. I have the other rider pistol and I am not too impressed with it. I am interested in this one. I may have to make a special trip out to cabellas this weekend. I wonder how many feet per second the pellet travels?? Could it generate as much power as an average co2 pellet pistol. Obiously I know it is a short range pistol. But how much power would a 209 primer give it?:confused: