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sureshots
January 9, 2009, 06:37 PM
Most everyone that Hunted Deer this season had at least some degree of success. What did you do with your Kill? I kept some and gave most of it to others. Do you have an unusual receipt you would share with others?

Bud Helms
January 9, 2009, 06:54 PM
The Hunt.

kayakersteve
January 9, 2009, 06:56 PM
I got an entire one made into extra hot sausage.
I got one cut into jerky meat, steaks and ground.
The third was made into smoked cooked sauage with pepper jack cheese and more ground.

I eat the sausage weekly.
I send aome presmoked cooked to relatives as gifts.
I use the ground and mix it 50/50 to make meat balls for our sauce every Sunday. Grill or put steaks in crock pot.

Bitmap
January 9, 2009, 07:34 PM
My kids and I filled the deep freeze almost to the very top with deer and turkey.

The only times we buy beef is when certain family members come to visit.

BIGR
January 9, 2009, 07:55 PM
It has been vaccum sealed and placed in my freezer. I will eat some and give the rest away.

rantingredneck
January 9, 2009, 08:07 PM
I had the first one processed for myself.

I had the second one processed for a friend.

I quartered the third one for a friend who wanted whole hams/shoulders to roast.

Kreyzhorse
January 9, 2009, 08:58 PM
I shared some of this year's deer with a couple of co-workers. As far as processing, I had it all ground with the exception of the backstraps and a couple of roasts. So far, have made some chili and jerky out of the roast.

I'm also having a Euro mount made out of the head.

bswiv
January 9, 2009, 10:00 PM
Besides the one that got fed to the cougar and the tiger ( link to that post, http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=325761 ) we process our own. Some jerky, little ground and a bunch for frying. Most of it is gone already.

Still shooting hogs, got one Tuesday evening. Process them ourselves too. Some sausage, good bit of fried and some gets the long slow cook..... Actually fed the crew at work fried pork on Thursday morning from the Tuesday night hog.

Had a bottle of fresh pure Maple Syrup from Vermont to dip it in......!!!!

Greg.B
January 9, 2009, 10:18 PM
We took three this year...all processed and put in the freezer in various forums: Ground, steaks, roasts, cubed, jerky strips, and whole rear quarters for the smoker.

We did give some steaks to my dad; he doesn't hunt anymore, but still loves the meat. :)

L'derry
January 9, 2009, 11:27 PM
After skinning, it went to the butcher. (I quit butchering my own after the first few). It came back to me vacuum sealed in the form of steaks, roasts, sausage and burger. Then this year, as in years past, some goes to hunting buddies at camp, some to close non-hunting friends, the rest into our freezer. My wife and I both prefer to eat venison while it lasts!

Why do you ask?:D

banditt007
January 10, 2009, 12:29 AM
bagged my first deer ever this year, (first big game animal too) and am proud to say i did all the work start to finish. Was a small spike buck. help from the internet has been fantastic from gutting to butchering ect. from videos to picture write ups it helped tremendously. infact i dont think i would have ever gotten into hunting (dont really know anyone that hunts) w/o the internet. as for the butchering no one ever taught me/never seen it in person but i did a really good job, especially for the first time b/c of all the help online...

anyhow w/ the meat this is what i did

front legs = ground meat (and through the tongue in too =)
neck meat/rib meat/flank = ground meat

rear legs i cut into the different muscle groups to be used as roasts and or steaked up when needed

the muscle that runs along the spine on the inside i ate the day i bagged it/and for the following few days. backstrap?

the loins that run along the outside of the animal along the spine i cut out and butterfly-steaked them.

i gave away a couple ground meat packages to some friends and since i bagged the thing early november, i've eaten some roasts/steaks and ground meat dish's from it. there is still plenty left frozen in the fridge.

though a lot of work from everything from driving 2 hours+ away a bunch of times to hunt, waking up at 3am, gas/tolls, dragging the animal out/butchering/freezing ect ect ....i can't wait to do it again (hopefully) next year!

bullspotter
January 10, 2009, 12:59 AM
1st deer i got. bow killed, took all the meat exept backstraps, and had it all made into polish and terriyaki pepper sticks, was a larg doe, second deer, rifle killed, i gave to a coworker. Both whitetails. Normaly i make mostly burger out of them if needed but i got a big cow elk during archery season so that took care of the steaks, stewmeat, roasts and burger.

LateNightFlight
January 10, 2009, 01:37 AM
We're working our way through an elk and a deer. The elk was processed in Colorado but I took the deer on my place and do those myself.

I've had either elk or deer almost everyday in one form or another. I got a new smoker so we've been having fun with that; we made a batch of summer sausage and just got a kit to make pepperoni snack sticks.

Today, for example, I browned a fist full of ground venison in a skillet along with some small chunked potato, then broke three eggs over it and dressed it up with some salsa. That's a brunch that will carry you until supper. I didn't make it to supper, though, and made a platter of cut summer sausage on club crackers with a slice of cheese melted on top. After that I could have skipped dinner, but later in the evening some left over spaghetti sounded good... spaghetti with the meatiest meat sauce in the world, made with ground venison of course.

No problem putting away two deer most years, and now I consider myself to have been in training for a deer and an elk. The present trend indicates that I’m up to the challenge. :D

Bon appétit!

butta9999
January 10, 2009, 03:02 AM
share with friends and family

sc928porsche
January 10, 2009, 08:11 AM
YUM!

kayakersteve
January 10, 2009, 08:40 AM
Mine does a great job with processing and packaging, but I have never heard of one around here that vacumm seals the packages - Would think it would be too time consuming and expensive for them to be productive.

texfar
January 10, 2009, 08:40 AM
I have 2, 21cu ft upright freezers that stay full every year with deer, hog and whatever else I shoot. I normally shoot 5 deer every year, but this year, my rotation back across the pond cut my hunting short so only processed three, all doe. Left the big bucks alone this year. I will generally shoot one yearling ( talk about tender), and the rest a mix of medium doe and bucks. In the years of hunting on my own place I have only had one processed due to a time constraint. I looked at the box the meat was in and instantly knew I got ripped off quantity wise.
I generally bone the whole deer out while hanging and put in my dedicated fridge for aging. By boning it out I can get two good sized deer in there at once and get all the meat leaving nothing. A lot of folks scrap the brisket and rib meat as well as leg muscles, but you have no idea how much you are wasting. That meat along with the neck meat is dedicated to burger. because of the versatility of ground meat, that is how most of it gets done. I use a huge SS tray and fill it with ground no less than 3/4 inch level and use a plastic 32 oz drink cup to cut the burgers out with and pack them packs of 2 and 4 per pack. A few stew meat packs and some steaks. Back strap is for the grill only! After over 50 deer it has becomes a system and takes no time, with no waste and no mess. When I first started out the kitchen looked like the Manson affair. Now, not one drop of blood in the house. Table set up outside next to the deer and all is done right there. Wife is happy. Next year, I might do a video of my system.

As far cooking goes, I don't do anything much different than with beef. Venison spaghetti is one of our favorites using all fresh ingredients, tomatoes, garlic, mushrooms and onions. Venison crock pot roasts or stew meat is another favorite done traditional style with veggies etc. Liver is done using my wifes tried and true liver and onion receipt. Kidneys diced are added to the liver and onions and add a fantastic flavor. Heart, I usually slice thin and fry it with eggs for breakfast. Some times it gets diced and added to spaghetti. Our Hill Country Venison is a great tasting meat and I don't try and add to much other junk to destroy and detract from the taste. Years ago, I did some 50/50 burgers using pork and did not like it so it is pure venison now, cut with 10% by wt., beef suet. NOT FAT, Beef Suet. It is the hard fat that comes from around the kidneys and loin in the animal. I get it from the UK in boxes. Wife is English. Each box will do 5 pounds of meat. Good luck finding it these days in the states. It binds the burger and makes it as juicy as beef without altering the taste. I started out years ago thinking venison was a magical meat and I had to use one of those fancy receipts from a "GAME COOK BOOK", but that is utterly not true. I also do a fair amount of jerkey using my own marinade.

If you like seasonings, and don't already use these, I highly recommend McCormick " seasoning grinders" as they come in about any concoction you can think of. For venison burgers and steaks, my favorite, non-grinder, is the McCormick Montreal Steak seasoning which also comes in a spicy mild hot version. For venison spaghetti I use the McCormick "Italian Herb Seasoning" It seems to have everything in the right proportions for me. I do not work for McCormicks and don't sell their products. It is just a great product.

Edit: One last thing. For those of you who choose not to use all parts of the deer, consider taking some time to make your four legged friend some dog food out of it. I dedicated all my scrap and brisket/neck/leg meat from two deer this year for our dog. I course grind it, put in large pot, add enough water proportional to the amount of natural rice you are going to add, 1-2 pounds of baby carrots and cook. You might have to experiment with the water amount so that it does not come out really soupy, all absorbed by rice. Let it cool, get a ton of 1 qt double ziploc bags and package it. I package each meal for JD with 3/4-1 pound serving. Man he just loves it and it is good for him to boot! I put up a lot of bags for him in November as treat meals.
Ken

22-rimfire
January 10, 2009, 09:12 AM
I generally have most of the deer groundup into burger. I keep the back straps and have some tenderloins made up (chop steaks). About half the deer meat eventually gets given away. Wife doesn't like to cook it.

sserdlihc
January 10, 2009, 09:15 AM
HOT pepper jack cheese deer sticks!!!!

sureshots
January 10, 2009, 09:48 AM
Sounds great, thanks for the details, very helpful. You gave me A couple of new Ideals that I'm sure going to try.

12GaugeShuggoth
January 10, 2009, 11:05 AM
I "processed" them as people here term the process. I then packed the freezer. We ate a little during season, mainly loins and hearts....and I think one shoulder and one neck. Everyone I know that would have wanted to be given venison already had venison of their own, so we kept everything for ourselves this time 'round.

texfar
January 10, 2009, 11:17 AM
sureshots, no problem, I love the stuff.

As a note, if you can find the suet, try and get it fine ground in a box. DO NOT blend it with meat when grinding. It will stick to the screw in the grinder then is is no better than waste, because you now have a blob of it....Ask me how I know..LOL. Weigh out ground meat proportionally to what you will mix with the suet. I do it in 5 lb. lots. I normally go by 10% by weight, but when short of suet, I cut back to 5% and it was still good to go. Take your meat lot and put on a tray or better yet, a SS mixing bowl and sprinkle the suet over the meat a little at a time and mix well with your hands. Your meat, even after grinding should still be very cold, and the suet will not melt or ball up. Don't warm your hands up...grin and bare it, the meat is cold or should be.

Have you process a deer yourself yet?? If you have not, start another thread and your will get all kinds of help as well as from me. The idea is is being quick and efficient always keeping the meat cold. It is backyard butchering and not in a processing house. There are differences. There are tricks to be learned. I am still learning new things.
Ken

hoytinak
January 10, 2009, 11:40 AM
Haven't hunted deer in years so sadly the only whitetail I've gotten in a couple years was with my Jeep and it did almost as much damage to the Jeep as what the Jeep did to it. And according to Texas law we are not allow to touch roadkill...just had to let it sit there and feed the coyotes. :(

texfar
January 10, 2009, 11:49 AM
I do hunt, hoytinak, but the last one that I tangled with, without a rifle, was wife's BMW, cost me close to 5000 bucks!!!! Huge 12 point probably escaped from game ranch during 500 yr flood in the Hill Country. Barely drivable, I got home, collected my wife and truck, but by the time I got back, the head was gone!!! I was gonna mount it and hang a Bimmer hubcap on the rack. You are correct though.

Brian Pfleuger
January 10, 2009, 11:51 AM
We gave away 5 of the 7. Eat the rest.

kirpi97
January 10, 2009, 12:59 PM
I, like most of the posters here, would either freeze or sausage my venison. But that was up until 2002 when I met this crusty old rockhound. He spent his summers in eastern Oregon going through abandoned mines and digging for rocks. He was the one that turned me on to canning.

Canning the meat in a pressure cooker allowed him to take the meat with him out for months at a time without refrigeration. All his meat was packed in jars. And when he wanted it, there was no thawing out. And you could re-use the storage containers.

So I went home and took some of my 2002 kill out of the freezer and thawed it out. We processed about 20 pounds of meat that year. And since that year, all of my venison has been processed that way, with the exception of a a few loin steaks that I intend to eat fresh.

Now if you want steaks, then canning isn't for you. But if you like stews, chili, stroganoff, etc, then canning is a great way to go. The meat is tender regardless of the cut or membrane.

The best part of canning is not only the ability to take it with you on long campouts. But that it lasts. I have been saving and using a small jar each year to see how long it will last canned. I re-canned some of the 2002 quart jars into half pints for testing in 2005. And as of 2008, I can tell you not one bit of flavor has been lost. And the canned meatballs, Swedish style over noodles, canned in 2002, are still good on a campout with the Scouts.

So the best way to prepare your venison is the way you are going to consume it--on a plate.

rem870hunter
January 11, 2009, 07:41 PM
my time has not ended yet, last day is the 31st. what i do with it depends on how much meat is on it. i'll definetly send some over to my parents and my inlaws. the one i got in 2002 was made into ground meat. that was all the butcher could do with it.

winchester243
January 11, 2009, 08:05 PM
Same thing I do with all my deer, butcher them and eat them. :D

I did give some to my daughter when she went back to college. After complaining about eating deer all the time while growing up I was kinda surprised by her reaction when I offered to send some back to school with her, she was positively excited, must be something to do with saving money on groceries. :rolleyes:

Anyway I go through the same process with all my deer. Hang it, skin it, chunk it out and put it in the freezer till after hunting season when I have time to process it into steaks, stew meat, roasts and ground meat.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v157/winchester243/IMG_0579.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v157/winchester243/IMG_0581-1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v157/winchester243/IMG_0582.jpg

Ready for the freezer till after hunting season. I did 5 deer this year.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v157/winchester243/IMG_0583-1.jpg

fxdrider
January 12, 2009, 12:21 PM
The first two (a button buck and a decent sized doe) I took to a local processor, but at $65.00 pop - that was getting kind of expensive. So, I took the 3rd one, a smaller doe, straight home a butchered/processed her myself. I gave some to my 2 hunting buddies who didn't get any of their own this year, and gave some to my daughter and son-in-law, since he couldn't hunt this year. The rest is in my freezer - where it will steadily be retrieved, thawed, cooked in various ways, and thoroughly enjoyed.

Man, I'm getting hungry just thinking about it. ;)

armedtotheteeth
January 12, 2009, 10:42 PM
Normally, we put the quartered meat in a cooler for the ride home. Ice is not usually needed, but if we can get it , we will.
I leave it in the cooler for a week, in ice if there is no room for the whole deer in the family fridge. This goes suprisingly well with the mrs. The kids open the fridge and go "EWEEWWEE!" but they are getting more and more used to the idea. We now have a new fridge and the old one will be sent out to the shed to live its life as a tempory meat storage area, as it will freeze up in 2 weeks and be useless.
After the week or so in the fridge... it is sent to the dining room table for boning out. We grind what doesnt make nice neat steaks. I make jerky out of ground meat using some kinda jerky gun thing my wife got me for birthday while back. Kids eat the jerky more than I do.
Ground deer makes great burritos, tacos, meatloaf, spagetti.. You name it, just not very good burgers.
I can not remember the last time I bought store bought beef of any cut other than maybe hot dogs.
the deer and the Wild hogs fill our meat needs nicley, even with a family of 5, and three dogs, ( one of them being a 180 pound Great Dane)

Huntergirl
January 12, 2009, 10:46 PM
I butcher my own, but send some to a processor to make hamburger and summer sausage, since I don't have a grinder. I prefer 1/3ground beef to 2/3 ground venison and no suet. Makes it leaner and more palatable to my less game tasting family. Really liking the summer sausage that I got last season from a new in town processor. Will probably have more made next season.

Winchester243, your pictures were great for the "unititiated" hunters. I'll bet more will try butchering themselves.

armedtotheteeth
January 12, 2009, 10:53 PM
Uhm. We got a pretty durn good grinder as a gift. I know it was inexpensive. A good one can be had for $60 or so. Im guessin you can buy your own ground meat and mix your own. I aint payin no more butchers anymore.
I have had way way too much meat taken from me by butchers. The last deer i brought to the Butcher I know weighed 175 pounds after i gutted him. I weighed it!! I got back 37 pounds of meat. I can get more than that of my 12 year old greyhound. And he charged me 85$. (" extra charge for grinding it") WHAT@#$? its easier!!!

Huntergirl
January 13, 2009, 12:24 AM
Yeah, been thinking about getting a grinder, but not sure about brand. I don't want to get one that can't do the job after a few uses. This processor seemed pretty straight up. But experienced one in Dubois, Wy that I wouldn't ever recommend to anyone. Got some "poopy" tasting ground venison back from them. Unusual since it was a neck shot clean kill and I do a great, clean gut and butcher. So guessing I got someone else's lousy shot deer meat.

Crankylove
January 13, 2009, 12:28 AM
No Deer or Elk this year :( , but I did get my Antelope, along with two of my brothers. Butchered all three, and packed a freezer in the garage.

Nothin on this world like Antelope liver, onions, and some taters...........thats good eatin :)

Daryl
January 13, 2009, 05:33 AM
I've eaten every deer I've ever killed except one.

I was in Mexico, and couldn't bring the meat back across the border without it being frozen. I'd been hunting a ranch with no electricity, so there was no way to freeze it.

So, before I left I donated the meat to the vaquero that worked the ranch. That ol' boy lived in a lean-to, and worked on that ranch for seven dollars a month. It was a couple day's ride to town on horseback from the ranch, so he didn't get in too often. I've no doubt he appreciated the meat.

Daryl

scoutleader
January 13, 2009, 08:42 AM
I cut up enough to feed me and a couple of my neighbors that will eat it and give the rest to a local youth home. We also try to get a few for hunters for the hungry. Here is Tn you can kill 3 a day so we always have plenty.

armedtotheteeth
January 13, 2009, 01:46 PM
Huntergirl.
The 60 something dollar grinder at WAl MArt has made hundreds of pounds of sausage chili hamburger and jerky. No need for a $500 model unless you are doing this every day. I aint never trusting another butcher as long as I live.
No telling what they will put in there if they dont have to eat it.
In the past I have brought in hogs to the butcher- ( females) and without a doubt, recieved Boar meat in return. I know this because I can smell Boar meat from a mile. Nasty Stuff. Oh and the bag Of meat I got back weighed more than the pig I brought them. There might be a problem there.
Roll your own. Youll appreciate it more

texfar
January 13, 2009, 02:44 PM
+111 armedtotheteeth, been there done that ONCE. A grinder for the average folk is not that expensive to start with and can be used for other tasks. I also will NEVER trust a processing shop again. Case in point was a 1000 # nilgia that a buddy of mine shot on the King ranch. Processor provided two coolers (small) of meat from that animal????? Watched workers taking roasts or whatever out of the cooler for 1 hr. No comment past this!
Ken:mad:

aerod1
January 14, 2009, 01:34 PM
Whitetail Deer:
Backstrap butterflied
Tenders whole
Smoked links
Rest in Hamburger

Hog:
Backstrap Chops
Boar link sausage
Tamales
Rest in brealfast sausage

armedtotheteeth
January 15, 2009, 10:07 PM
I for the life of me cannot figure out how anyone can palate the taste of wild boar. double :barf:. Just the smell of that armpit smelling meat makes me need to hurl.

DiscoRacing
January 15, 2009, 10:18 PM
got two buck and three doe this year.... let the boys each get a buck and i get the ones without antennas... we put four in the freeze and i gave one to an elderly woman that i know because she likes the meat and didnt know anyone that would get one for her.

Big Bill
January 23, 2009, 04:48 PM
We butcher every deer, elk, bear, duck, quail, pheasant, etc. we kill here at home. It always turns out great and we enjoy it much more than having it processed. I've always taught my sons that ethical hunting involves putting the meat, bones, feathers, hide, etc. provided to good use. I make exceptions for coyotes, cougars, bobcats, etc, if taken legally and fair chase methods are used we don't eat the meat. But, we use the hides, heads, etc. as much as possible. IMHO, killing is serious business and should not be done thoughtlessly. It gripes me to see some brainless idiot trophy hunter shoot a big buck or bear on the Outdoor Channel and then laugh and do high fives all around.

PaddyWhacked
January 23, 2009, 05:32 PM
Freezer. Couple of roasts, backstraps, five 7lbs bags of burger meat, 15lbs or so of jerky and heart & liver.

We butcher every deer, elk, bear, duck, quail, pheasant, etc. we kill here at home. It always turns out great and we enjoy it much more than having it processed. I've always taught my sons that ethical hunting involves putting the meat, bones, feathers, hide, etc. provided to good use. I make exceptions for coyotes, cougars, bobcats, etc, if taken legally and fair chase methods are used we don't eat the meat. But, we use the hides, heads, etc. as much as possible. IMHO, killing is serious business and should not be done thoughtlessly. It gripes me to see some brainless idiot trophy hunter shoot a big buck or bear on the Outdoor Channel and then laugh and do high fives all around.

So it bothers you when someone gets stoked over a big kill?

Big Bill
January 23, 2009, 06:13 PM
So it bothers you when someone gets stoked over a big kill?Yep! It bothers me when some hillybilly laughs while some animal is dying. Then they walk up to it and say, "That sure is one beautiful animal." It was beautiful, now it's just dead - stupid. These are just some of the thoughts that go through my head. But then, I don't like trophy hunters!

Jseime
January 23, 2009, 07:13 PM
Eat it... they hang in a cousins garage and when its time to cut them up we fire up the bandsaw and get after it.

I take as much steak as i can from mine and the rest gets ground and usually mixed with a little pork. The ground stuff is made into sausage, pepperoni, salami and whatnot and distributed amongst the crew.

PaddyWhacked
January 23, 2009, 07:19 PM
Normally, we put the quartered meat in a cooler for the ride home. Ice is not usually needed, but if we can get it , we will.
I leave it in the cooler for a week, in ice if there is no room for the whole deer in the family fridge. This goes suprisingly well with the mrs. The kids open the fridge and go "EWEEWWEE!" but they are getting more and more used to the idea. We now have a new fridge and the old one will be sent out to the shed to live its life as a tempory meat storage area, as it will freeze up in 2 weeks and be useless.
After the week or so in the fridge... it is sent to the dining room table for boning out. We grind what doesnt make nice neat steaks. I make jerky out of ground meat using some kinda jerky gun thing my wife got me for birthday while back. Kids eat the jerky more than I do.
Ground deer makes great burritos, tacos, meatloaf, spagetti.. You name it, just not very good burgers.
I can not remember the last time I bought store bought beef of any cut other than maybe hot dogs.
the deer and the Wild hogs fill our meat needs nicley, even with a family of 5, and three dogs, ( one of them being a 180 pound Great Dane)
Deer makes excellent burgers, you just have to mix in some fatty ground beef. I like two parts venison to one part beef. The fat in the beef holds the venison together in patty shape and keeps it from shrinking up as bad as it does in the pan.

Yep! It bothers me when some hillybilly laughs while some animal is dying. Then they walk up to it and say, "That sure is one beautiful animal." It was beautiful, now it's just dead - stupid. These are just some of the thoughts that go through my head. But then, I don't like trophy hunters!

There has never been a kill where I haven't been both extremely excited and grateful. I live for a sense of independence. Killing and butchering my own food brings this twinkle to my eye that some "bed rest" couldn't. Do I kill for racks? No, doe tastes better anyway. Am I going to mount it if it's a monster buck? Bet your rear end. I'm not trying to bring you down here. It just seems to me like you've taken the fun out of hunting for yourself and made it more of a mourning process.

armedtotheteeth
January 23, 2009, 10:37 PM
I always feel a little sorry for the animals I shoot. The deer mainly as I dont really care for the pigs too much. Dont get me wrong, I try to kill them ethically, but, there are just so damned many of them these days. Anyways, Hunting and Butchering your own meat is kinda enbedded in my DNA. Its kinda instinct I guess. Its just something I have to do,Like scratchin or sittin on the pot.

Big Bill
January 23, 2009, 11:01 PM
Perhaps I'm being too harsh. I know it's natural to be excited when one has just made a great kill on a nice buck or bull elk. But, on some of those shows they just laugh and not because they're excited, but probably because they just got it on film. Killing an animal has always had an effect on me. I do it because we have needed the meat for food, and I was just as happy to get a fat doe as a fat buck.

A few years ago my 15 YO son shot a spike buck with his bow. He made a nice lung shot and I watched that little buck gasp for air until he expired. My son was excited and told me that was the best experience he ever had. I reminded him gently that that young buck had just lost his life so that we could have some meat for the winter. But, also congratulated him on the good, clean shot.

Then, three years ago I was out pheasant hunting with my 11 YO and I had a heart attack and I was gasping for air. Luckily, I made it back to the truck and got to the hospital OK, but I couldn't help thinking about that spike buck and how he felt. I know animals have feelings. I have two very sensitive dogs that hang on my every word. I know they hurt and have needs and love living. I don't think wild animals are much different.

So, to me it's just the right thing to do to be respectful in the face of death - any death whether it be animal or human.

KEN K
January 26, 2009, 11:00 AM
HUNTERGIRL I bought a grinder last year and it was the best $ I ever spent. I got a Tasin TS-108 not very expensive, all metal gears,easy to use and clean, came with everything I needed except hog casings. Gone through 8 deer and a buffalo so far and no signs of wear, first cutter blade is still sharp, I'll probably never get to the spare it came with. I don't like taking deer to a processor and getting 50 lbs. of meat out of a 180 lb.deer. I trim the ribs, lower leg brisket and neck for burger,heart for frying, liver to a friend that likes it, back strap and tenderloin for special meals. I like to use a good roast to make jerky cutting it across grain and marinating it over night in my oun concoction, 4 oz. each of liquid smoke worcestershire sauce and soy sauce, the spice to taste, I use a lot of black pepper ect. that enough for 20- 25 lbs. of meat.

Huntergirl
January 26, 2009, 10:02 PM
Thanks Ken, and others for suggestions on a meat grinder. I'm going to check them out.:)

jal5
January 27, 2009, 07:40 PM
Got a nice buck this year. As usual I have a butcher process it due to time and space constraint here at home. Steaks, burger, roast, butterfly chops, tenderloins. good eatin! did a crock pot roast that was exceptional just last week.
We gave away some to my daughter's family and to a widow with 6 kids that we help out too!
Joe

jbdnew
January 27, 2009, 08:56 PM
I had a local guy turn an old doe in summer sausage for me. He did a wonderful job, mixing in cheese and peppers. I am having a few slices right now:)

MeekAndMild
January 27, 2009, 09:01 PM
What did you do with the Deer you killed?Nothing. Zip. Zero. Nada.:o

With 4 days left in the season I've been skunked this year, the first time in 8 straight years! Saw lots of little ones and jumped a couple of pretty big ones, even saw Bullwinkle as he vanished into the swamp, but I'm living on leftovers from the freezer unless I get lucky this week. :(

James R. Burke
February 21, 2009, 03:44 PM
My wife got the deer. We had a neck roast made, kept the backstraps, and tenderloins. Then we had the remaining 75% made into summer sausage, and the other 25% made into jerky. That way it all gets eat. Give some to really close freinds, and thats about it.

OLNfan
March 2, 2009, 01:47 PM
I have read alot of responses and Im greatly surprised how many hunters bring their meat in to the butchers. My frist 2 bucks my buddy who is an apprentis butcher came on over and showed me what to do..nothing fancy. But 6 bucks and 2 black bear later I have done all myself. I have no secrets really just keep the loins and a few steaks but the rest I grind up, and mix with beef for the people in my family who dont like a gamey taste. Throw in alot of garlic and every bodys loved it. Iv made breakfast sausages (that gets a little tiring making) and chubs of garlic sasuage (just grind it all up squish it like the big salimi's you see at the store, put it in the oven and rotate it slightly every 30 mins. I find it kind of funny when I see "I got it made in to" and so on, I have the money to disopose of for the butchers but I could find a better way to spend it hah. I also noticed alot of people give it away! I will give ONE out of my chubs away but what the hell, why in gods name would I give it away, it taste ****n delicious! I have a bear sandwhich or deer sandwich 1-2 a day. I pull a chub out from the freezer let it thaw, throw it on my pizza, my sandwhich, in my spagahti (for the meat balls) and so on!

kingudaroad
March 2, 2009, 04:46 PM
Venison chili
http://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/kingudaroad/chili002.jpg
Venison Bratwurst
http://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/kingudaroad/bratwurst001.jpg
Venison smoked sausage
http://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/kingudaroad/qview014.jpg
Venison jerky
http://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/kingudaroad/jerky/jerky001.jpg

If you learn to do it yourself it will taste better!!!

sureshots
March 3, 2009, 09:53 PM
Nice pictures. Looks DELICIOUS, YUM,YUM, thanks

lon371
March 5, 2009, 03:45 AM
We generally process our own. Lots of steaks and roast. For Christmas got a grinder. Do have some processed depending on temp and time. This year had 40lbs turned into Bratwurst and Bologne(oh my goodness) You can't even imagine how good that is. I do share with folks who can't hunt. We make loads of jerky(we are popular around Christmas)

Have an Amish family up the road who smokes all his. I do see a smoke house being built this year out back.:)

My dogs do get there share of scrap meat. The coyotes get the bones and hides, keeps them off the Turkeys.

Lonny

PredatorHunter
March 8, 2009, 09:23 AM
Eat em and hang their heads on the wall... :D

James R. Burke
March 12, 2009, 07:05 PM
Kingudaroad you no doubt got me very hungry. Nice job! I would rather see some hard work go into it or have someone with the skill to do it. That way it all gets used, and is very good. You got me wanting to get back out there already. Have a good one!

ojibweindian
March 13, 2009, 10:46 AM
I kept mine. I had the shoulders and hind quarters ground, and the back straps and tenderloin became roasts.

lon371
March 13, 2009, 07:47 PM
Had Brats last night and deer ground in chili tonight. :D Going to have some balogne thawed by morning MMmmmm:p


Lonny

skydiver3346
March 13, 2009, 08:52 PM
Am eating it tonight as we speak. Also, many other nights as well. Remember, you can eat venison just the same way as any other red meat without all the steroids, additives, etc that are in commercial beef. My wife and I took seven deer this past season and either give some of it away to friends or enjoy the rest of it ourselves all year long. Especially the medium hot smoked sausage. Hard to beat that........

sneeker
March 13, 2009, 10:01 PM
I got two deer this year,both the first day of rifle season. A doe in the morning and a buck in the afternoon.They did a nice job of eluding me during archery season this year. Came so close several times but no soap,will not take a bad shot. The front legs, shoulder, and neck go to the grind and bite size pieces for chili and stew.The hindquarter gets separated into individual muscles and cut into steaks. The smaller pieces not large enough for steaks we just throw on the grill . The backstrap gets cut into steaks(My family and I really like venison steaks!) Of coarse the tenderloin gets grilled immediately ( over coals). We like meat blackened so just before they are done you lay thick sliced bacon on the grill, the juice starts dripping and really kicks up the flames.Yum! Weber grill creations, and McCormic grill mates are really good seasonings. Eastman outdoors has a good slow cooker seasoning for chili. My son and I usually do the grilling (he's ten)but we got caught eating off the grill one time so now we are monitored by the wife and daughter (she's eight)oh well good things never last! We still get away with it... sometimes. If you are thinking of processing your own deer but have no experience might I suggest a dvd series by Larry Metz. Deer processing 1 field dressing and skinning, and deer processing 2 boning the deer carcass. Once viewed you will have no doubt what to do, and how to do it. One place to get it is cabelas. Good hunting!

Kendo
March 22, 2009, 11:27 AM
Between me and the boys we got 5 deer and 2 pigs this year. My wife bought me a grinder for christmas this year and Man that may be the best present I've ever got. The guys above are right , process it all yourself. We've got summer sausage, beersticks, burger, sausage,not to mention the steaks the roasts. Man what a season, best one I've had in years.

jamaica
March 27, 2009, 07:57 PM
I always butcher the deer myself. I bone it out and trim off most all of the fat. The good cuts are cut into steaks, even if they are just little ones. The leg cuts and small pieces that won't make good frying meat, are cut into small chunks and labeled Stew Meat. Its all wrapped in freezer paper and frozen.

Sometimes I will take some bones and a bit of leg meat and pressure
cook it in half a kettle of water, then bottle (presssure cooker) the broth for use later.

If the freezer is full, I have bottled the meat. (Pressure cooker)

I also like to make jerky. When the kids were home we used to jerk a whole deer when the freezer got full.

I do not grind deer meat. Nor do I ever mix beef or pork fat with it. What ya trying to do spoil the deer?

BIGR
March 28, 2009, 04:51 PM
Update: I have some deer tenderloin, marinating in the fridge right now. I will grill it tomorrow evening. The thing I hate its the last tenderloin I have until deer season 2009 cranks up....SADNESS.....:eek:

kingudaroad
April 7, 2009, 05:02 PM
I do not grind deer meat. Nor do I ever mix beef or pork fat with it. What ya trying to do spoil the deer?

So I like my venison ground with 30 percent pork fat, seasoned, cured, stuffed in a hog casing and smoked over a hickory fire for six or seven hours.

You like yours boiled and put away in a jar.

I'll go ahead and take some of that spoiled deer.:rolleyes:

PRONE2
April 7, 2009, 06:33 PM
We strip it CLEAN! Take every part we can eat, then grind everything else(silver skink, tendons, and damaged meat) grind it and boil it and feed it to our dogs. When my wife and I are done with the deer the worms don't have much left.

bwheasler
April 7, 2009, 07:18 PM
I think the best we can do as sportman is to show everyone you can that this wonder table fare. For the nonhunter the best way to show we are not blood thirsty heathens is to eat and utilize every thing possible. I have made many meals for people who were impressed that it was wild game. Use the antlers for buttons, knife handles, and anything you can dream up. Hunt it, Shoot it, Eat it, Use it. That has been going on since the dawn of man.