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arcticap
January 6, 2009, 04:31 AM
There's some posts on another forum relating to the sale of Goex to Hodgdon, the manufacturer of Pyrodex and 777.

The first post stated:

This was posted on the Shiloh Rifle site by Mike Venturino.

According to a friend at Hodgdon Powder Company they became sole owner of Goex as of this morning. Starting Monday January 5th Tom Shepard, President of Hodgdon will also assume the title of President of Goex.

Hodgdon's plan is to leave manufacturing where it is and to aggressively promote sales and improve distribution


Another posted stated:

EMAIL REPLY FROM HODGDON....

As of January 2, 2009 Hodgdon Powder Company purchased GOEX. We intend to make no changes in the location of manufacture nor in the personnel who manufacture GOEX. As the largest share of the GOEX production goes to the military and commercial applications, we have great expectations that sales will continue strong and the sporting market will benefit from the volume being produced.
Rest assured, we want GOEX to go on for another hundred years.

New Customer Service Hours: 7:00 AM to 5:30 PM Central Time, Monday through Thursday. For help during any other time, please visit the Reloading Data Center at www.hodgdon.com

For a complete listing of all rifle, pistol and shotshell reloading recipes for Hodgdon, IMR and Winchester Smokeless Propellants, go to www.hodgdon.com and use the Reloading Data Center

Mike Daly
Customer Satisfaction Manager
The Hodgdon Powder Company Family of Propellants:
Hodgdon Smokeless powders
Pyrodex Muzzleloading Propellants
Triple Seven Muzzleloading Propellants
IMR Smokeless Powders
Winchester Smokeless Powders

thallub
January 6, 2009, 01:41 PM
Thanks for the information. Looks like time for me to order a case of Goex 3F Pinnacle.

long rider
January 6, 2009, 02:50 PM
The down side of goex pinnacle is that it is very drity
and it as bin out for a long time now, they use it in the
black dawg cases in 45s and so on, but you can not
beat real bp which pinnacle is not, but each to their own.:rolleyes::D

arcticap
January 8, 2009, 04:20 AM
Someone from Germany speculated that since Hodgdon products are being distributed there but not Goex, maybe Goex will become available in the future.

gmatov
January 13, 2009, 12:34 AM
Black powder is not an anachronism. It is not just for those of us who burn it and love the smell.

It is the greatest part of the charge of large artillery propellants. 16 inch battleship charges used some 450 pounds per shot. I would think that 8 and 6 and 5 inch rounds would be the same.

BP can achieve 100,000 PSI chamber pressure, under the right circumstance, and I would think the US Military knows what that is.

Watch a BB shoot and question why there are such big clouds of smoke from the muzzles. I think "smokeless" is supposed to be just that, smokeless. ANybody ever watch "Under Siege", with Steven Segal? Watched it again last night. Might rerun it when I leave here.

I like him, love that battlewagon.

Cheers,

George

tube_ee
January 13, 2009, 01:48 AM
but I may be wrong.

--Shannon

arcticap
January 13, 2009, 04:31 AM
Here's another reported development:

The owner [of Hodgdon] said the only change that he has definite plans for is to change [the BP containers] from metal to plastic because it is "safer" for transporting.

I'm just going on what I read as a letter between two old friends that one of the two posted.


Start kissing those metal Goex containers bye! bye! :D

B. Lahey
January 13, 2009, 05:26 AM
Black powder is not an anachronism. It is not just for those of us who burn it and love the smell.

It is the greatest part of the charge of large artillery propellants. 16 inch battleship charges used some 450 pounds per shot. I would think that 8 and 6 and 5 inch rounds would be the same.

BP can achieve 100,000 PSI chamber pressure, under the right circumstance, and I would think the US Military knows what that is.


Nope. US naval guns run on smokeless. Smokeless is just less smokey, there is still some smoke most of the time.

http://www.navweaps.com/index_tech/tech-100.htm

Propellant Charge Weights for Bag Guns
Most non-official (and many official) published references for USN bag guns vary from each other by a few pounds (a couple of kilograms) as to the charge weights used by any particular bag gun. Primarily, this is because most official documents exclude the weight of the gunpowder used as bag igniters, but a few official documents combine the igniter weights with the actual SPD propellant weight. Complicating matters is that after World War II a cooler burning formulation of SP was adopted which resulted in slightly different charge weights.

For example, a full charge for the 16"/50 (40.64 cm) Mark 7 during the World War II period consisted of six propellant bags whose total propellant weight was 660.0 lbs. (299.4 kg) of SPD and 4.463 lbs. (2.1 kg) of gunpowder. Some references show this charge weight as 660.0 lbs. (299.4 kg) while others show it as 664.463 lbs. (301.4 kg). With the post-war adoption of the cooler burning propellant, the six bag full charge weight for this gun changed to 655.0 lbs. (297.108 kg) and 4.463 lbs. (2.1 kg) of gunpowder. Again, some references show this charge weight as 655.0 lbs. (297.108 kg) while others show it as 659.463 lbs. (299.2 kg). For the most part, on my datapages I list only the actual propellant weight without the igniter gunpowder as shown in U.S. Explosive Ordnance: Ordnance Pamphlet 1664 which I have found to be reliable for the World War II period.


SPD - Smokeless Powder with Diphenylamine as a stabilizer, adopted by the USN in 1908

B.L.E.
January 13, 2009, 07:02 AM
I understand that the bulk of the charge in those 16 inch guns is a smokeless propellent but a small bag of black powder (also called gunpowder) was used just ahead of the breach for the primer to ignite and get the chamber pressure up to the range where smokeless powder burns efficiently.

With smokeless powder, the primer's job is not just to ignite the powder, it also creates the initial pressure in the chamber so that the smokeless powder burns fast right away. If you only set smokeless on fire, you get bloopers.

mykeal
January 13, 2009, 07:13 AM
I would agree that black powder is not an anachronism. However, the reference to it's use in 16 inch, or even 5 inch, naval guns doesn't make that point; there is no greater anachronism than a battleship's main batteries, and even the ubiquitous 5 inch gun is fast disappearing.

thallub
January 13, 2009, 10:21 PM
The navy calls it "Navy "cool" powder. Here is the info on the prop charge for the 16"/50 gun.

World War II Full Charge - 660.0 lbs. (299.4 kg) SPD
World War II Reduced Charge - 305.0 lbs. (138.3 kg) SPD or SPDN
World War II Reduced Flashless Charge - 325.0 lbs. (147.4 kg) SPCG


Post World War II Full Charge - 655.0 lbs. (297.1 kg) D839
Post World War II Reduced Charge - 305.0 lbs. (138.3 kg) D840
Post World War II Reduced Flashless Charge - 325.0 lbs. (147.4 kg) D845

long rider
January 15, 2009, 08:04 PM
TO post #7
After reading that, true or not i am glad i was
smart in thinking i will KEEP my bp cans just
incase.:rolleyes::D