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vwjoe84
December 20, 2008, 11:56 PM
Is it O.K. to use 100% crisco on the front end of the cylinders to prevent chain fires. Or does it have to be a 50/50 mix of crisco and beeswax? My father told me he always used vaseline on his. But the more I've read into it, it's best to use something water soluble. I'd like to use something I can get at the grocery store, instead of having to order online.

Smokin_Gun
December 21, 2008, 12:06 AM
It'll work, makes a mess puttin' it on, and after the first shot the remainin' cyls. Crisco has melted away. Parafin at the market, olive Oil/Soy/Oil, beeswax or bowl wax will work very well.
8 tbls. Olive Oil, 40/60(adjust to your likin') Beeswax or Bolwax to parafin edible from the Grocery store type. Melt in a pot within a pan a water. Cool 1/8' deep in a heavy duty pie pan. Cookie cut to your diameter.
*Bolwax Hardware store all wax no plastic comode to floor wax seal ring.

SG

fastforty
December 21, 2008, 12:22 AM
I've used a lota Crisco, but like smokey said, the stuff gets pretty runny after a shot or two (or from the get-go in hot weather). I like Bore Butter, it comes in a tube of almost-already-runny consistency or in a jar that is pretty stiff. The stiff stuff might be a little expensive to use all of the time, but it's great if you're going to load & not fire for a while, it won't wind up dripping out of the bottom of your holster :)

vwjoe84
December 21, 2008, 12:38 AM
Cool thank you for the replies, and that recipe. Using just crisco will get me by for now. I'm going shooting tomorrow so don't have the time to order anything. Eventually though I might get some of that bore butter.

Smokin_Gun
December 21, 2008, 12:51 AM
Have fun, be safe, and make smoke!

sg

jaguarxk120
December 21, 2008, 10:15 AM
Glad to hear someone else use's bolwax! Use it for lube on all kinds of things. In the reloading room a little bit on the fingers works as resizing lube. TF

kwhi43@kc.rr.com
December 21, 2008, 12:10 PM
If you use crisco, be sure and use the butter flavor kind.

4V50 Gary
December 21, 2008, 12:26 PM
Butter flavor? I use the rancid stuff that's part of the family inheritance.

jaguarxk120
December 21, 2008, 01:16 PM
It just says wax toilet bowl gasket. Nowhere on the box did it say beeswax. Just wax not what kind. In pistol shooting I don't think it matters what type of lube you use. As long it is compatable with black powder. All of the secret formulas are just about the same today. If it works for you then use it!

Hawg Haggen
December 21, 2008, 02:05 PM
Felt wads are cost effective when compared to all this boiling and mixing.

How so? All it costs is a little time. I make my own wads too.

jaguarxk120
December 21, 2008, 02:42 PM
I can not how felt wads are cost effective.

When you make your own lub/wads it is now tailored to your own pistol/rifle.

Some want to shoot all day with out cleaning, go home and through the gun into the safe till the next time. Some will strip the handgun down to the last screw and clean till it's like it left the factory. The same with lube's some are marginal and some are more than enough. It's just what you need at the time of shooting.

pohill
December 21, 2008, 05:14 PM
I put this on other forums, I might as well post it here...
I use the vegetable spray PAM on my Paterson and Remingtons. Works great. Spray it on the cylinder pins, down the barrel, sometimes even use it in place of Crisco over the balls in the cylinder. It's not so great on Colts for some reason.
Try it, then knock it.
Now wait for the jokes...

arcticap
December 21, 2008, 05:30 PM
Aren't using fillers over the powder such as corn meal, Cream of Wheat, Semolina and grits effective at preventing chain fires if enough is used?

If they are, then either the number of chambers lubed with Crisco or at least the amount of Crisco needed to keep the fouling soft can be reduced in each chamber.
If the Crisco gets runny during firing, can it run into the bottom of the chamber and contaminate the powder that way, especially if too much is used or if the balls are a little too loose?

And might better accuracy be another benefit of using a filler along with less Crisco? :)

B.L.E.
December 21, 2008, 06:03 PM
A lot of chain fires happen from the rear of the cylinder. Never shoot a revolver without a cap on the nipple of every loaded chamber.

mykeal
December 21, 2008, 07:34 PM
Aren't using fillers over the powder such as corn meal, Cream of Wheat, Semolina and grits effective at preventing chain fires if enough is used?

There's nothing magic about a chain fire. It's simply the result of hot gas entering the chamber and igniting the powder.

Inert powder fillers have no characteristics that would prevent hot gas from reaching the powder, other than increasing the distance between the ball and the powder, and that 1/4 to 3/8 inch is a pretty small distance. They are not dense enough to form a gas seal.

The best protection from a chain fire is to provide a gas seal between the powder and the openings to the chamber, at BOTH ends.

Hawg Haggen
December 21, 2008, 07:54 PM
Aren't using fillers over the powder such as corn meal, Cream of Wheat, Semolina and grits effective at preventing chain fires if enough is used?

Possibly but the amount of powder you can use is reduced.


If the Crisco gets runny during firing, can it run into the bottom of the chamber and contaminate the powder that way, especially if too much is used or if the balls are a little too loose?

Never seen it happen. If the balls are loose you're going to have bigger problems than a little contaminated powder.

And might better accuracy be another benefit of using a filler along with less Crisco?

Some people swear light loads are more accurate. I have three bp revolvers and this is not the case with any of them. I notice no difference in accuracy with 20 grs. of powder (which is a really wimpy load with a .44) or 35 grs. or powder.

madcratebuilder
December 22, 2008, 10:50 AM
Food grade paraffin is petroleum based, and will gum up the works.

It is a alkane hydrocarbon. It is distinct from the fuel known in Britain and South Africa as paraffin oil or just paraffin, which is called kerosene in most of the U.S., Australia and New Zealand.
I've been using it(grease cookies) (thxSG) for a while and don't see that at all. I keep things wiped down while at the range, and when I get home and do my cleaning, the fouling is soft and washes right off.

I use the vegetable spray PAM on my Paterson and Remingtons. Works great. Spray it on the cylinder pins, down the barrel, sometimes even use it in place of Crisco over the balls in the cylinder. It's not so great on Colts for some reason.

I tried it and it seems to work pretty damn good, it's part of my ever growing range box, soon to become trunk. Is Pam is just food grade Ballistol???
I'm using grease cookies under the rb and everything runs great. Your right about the Colts. I use a grease cookie to smear the grease grooves on the Colts every 4 or 5 cylinders.

Hawg Haggen
December 22, 2008, 01:15 PM
It is a alkane hydrocarbon. It is distinct from the fuel known in Britain and South Africa as paraffin oil or just paraffin, which is called kerosene in most of the U.S., Australia and New Zealand.
I've been using it(grease cookies) (thxSG) for a while and don't see that at all. I keep things wiped down while at the range, and when I get home and do my cleaning, the fouling is soft and washes right off.

Learn something new every day. Or in my case every month or two.:D

51colt
December 23, 2008, 07:29 AM
I was a linoleum layer for 30yr i always had a case of wax rings on the truck. Used them for over the ball lube all the time however they are not bees wax anymore they haven't been for a long time. They are made of petroleum wax that said i have had no problems using them. Is fact they work good. I am going try some dollar store cooking spray. The cooking spray sounds like a good idea. Has anyone used it to oil up their guns after cleaning them?

pohill
December 23, 2008, 07:50 AM
I use the PAM (or a cheaper store version) on guns that don't have a grooved cylinder pin - Paterson, Remington. My Walker did not like it, and I haven't tried it on my other Colts. I still use Bore Butter for an internal lube simply because I don't know how the PAM would be on the innards after any length of time. I spray it over the balls in the cylinder and it leaves a film, kinda like what's left of the Crisco or Bore Butter after the first shot.
But read the can - it says the spray is flammable, but I've never had a problem.

jaguarxk120
December 23, 2008, 08:24 AM
I think they caution you about pam being flammable is when it's used around a gas stove with open flames.

Gbro
December 23, 2008, 09:23 AM
I think they caution you about pam being flammable is when it's used around a gas stove with open flames.

The auto ignition temps of the ingredients determine when they will ignite. open flame is just a heat source.
ETOH is probably the most flammable ingredient(pam) in the range of 700 deg (F). The ETOH will evaporate soon after it is applied leaving a coating that is of a much higher auto ignition temp. As their is also a propellant , although it isn't revealed on my can of pam but is propane in many aerosol products.

see this link (http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/fuels-ignition-temperatures-d_171.html)

jaguarxk120
December 23, 2008, 09:30 AM
When the stove is on fire I do not think your thinking about ignition temperatures!