PDA

View Full Version : Found while hunting......


bswiv
December 7, 2008, 09:15 AM
Advice needed here.............

While wandering the swamp after hogs yesterday ( No success even though we saw a few deer. ) stumbled on a BIG hornets nest hanging from a Sweet Gum tree limb. The limb is within easy reach of my pole saw/pruner and thin enough to where it should be easy to clip.

Nest is in perfect shape and about 2 feet long. Even thogh I was hunting a part of the swamp I've not been in before I'm sure I can find it again.

So here is the problem............it's still active!!!

I know that in the frozen north all you guys have to do is wait for it to get cold as heck and then go get it. Hornet will be dead.

But folks this is Florida and these guys are still going strong. And if this winter is like last winter it's possible that we will not have a freeze hard enough to kill them.

So.......ideas?

12GaugeShuggoth
December 7, 2008, 09:31 AM
Personally my advice would be to just leave it alone.....but that's just me :) Just have every step planned out in advance in case you need to make a fast retreat.

treg
December 7, 2008, 09:35 AM
Bringing in a frozen hornets nest will get you a house full of warm lively hornets.

hoytinak
December 7, 2008, 09:35 AM
I wouldn't mess with it either.

PT111
December 7, 2008, 09:40 AM
LOL - Leave the thing alone!!!!! A friend of mine who was a forester found one in the middle of winter and cut it down. He gave it to his sister who was a school teacher for her room at school. She placed in her room and all the kids were thrilled over it. The next Monday when they opened up the school her room was full of hornets and they had to cancel school that day until an exterminator could get rid of the things. Lets just say that she inspects any presents from him now. Just because it is not active and the middle of winter doesn't mean the larva can't hatch out when it is warmed. :o

bswiv
December 7, 2008, 09:54 AM
So I hear you............but even at 52 years old there is a bit of child in me. I just have to do this thing.

Besides that there is probably a YouTube moment in it too.............

fisherman66
December 7, 2008, 10:03 AM
You could take some "hot shot" wasp killer and a body net. Place the sprayed nest in a coffee can with an extra shot of poison and put the cap on the can. If you are worried about the poison, you can risk the sting (I'd cover all exposed body parts with heavy clothes and still use a body net. Freeze the coffee can for several days once you are done.

hogdogs
December 7, 2008, 10:17 AM
Yes as a former "bugman", I have toyed with many a various large nest of stinging things... A couple cans of high quality "like commercial grade from a DIY pest control store". spray it with a good dose and leave them alone for at least 30-60 minutes to calm down. Give it another shot and repeat until no more flyers remain. Now for the fun part... get yer dumbest "goon" buddy to stand under it and catch it when you clip it free so it isn't damaged landing. This may require a large dose of liquid courage or liquid thank you... (goons choice)...
Brent

lomaxanderson
December 7, 2008, 10:34 AM
:D

bswiv
December 7, 2008, 10:40 AM
"goon" will be Louann as the nest is out in 12 Mile Swamp RUA and you have to have a permit to get in. My brother in law already said NO WAY so Louann is the only choice.

Should be interesting.................

Will post pictures and a update after the deed is done.

fisherman66
December 7, 2008, 10:42 AM
Do you know for sure you have no allergies to stings? Anaphylactic shock is nothing to play around with.

bswiv
December 7, 2008, 10:50 AM
Don't know for sure. Sister and grandmother both had them.

But then I plan to let Louann do the getting stung. I figure as I'm faster than her if things go bad the bugs will get whoever is the easiest..............

hogdogs
December 7, 2008, 10:51 AM
Fisherman, If'n you spent much time in the florida swamps as bswiv and I have.... You can be pretty sure yer not allergic... My most recent such attack, I was squirrel huntin' and was trackin' one thru the scrub oaks. I must of stepped too close to a "ground nest" and stirred up the yeller jackets...
Before I was out of there I was stung under the shirt, on the back of the neck and the worst... "coup de tat" if you will was one right on my top lip dead center!:mad: Need less to say I left that tree rat for another day!
Macho as I may seem I can scream, squeal and run like a girl!:o
Brent

fisherman66
December 7, 2008, 10:52 AM
Well, if Sis or Grand Ma has an epi-pen laying around it might be a nice piece of insurance to take with you.

hogdogs
December 7, 2008, 10:53 AM
BSWIV, Being in a WMA type location, don't show it off on the way out... Many places do not allow removal of such items;)
Brent

shortwave
December 7, 2008, 11:10 AM
If you want to keep nest intact,don`t spray it. WAIT TILL DARK. If you can reach it with step ladder ,take two heavy trash bags,put one inside of other. Being as careful as you can,open bags and not touching sides of nest,enclose nest in bags clear up to attaching twig and seal bag around twig. Break twig off above bag. Leave bags seals tightly to sufocate bees. I`ve left them sealed better than a week and still heard buzzing in bag. Usually a couple weeks is good but shake bag before opening and listen for buzzing. FYI if your allergic to stings don`t fool with it. If your not be aware that multiple stings can be fatal. Anyone stung multiple times(whether having trouble breathing or not) should go to ER and be monitored. Things can go very bad (cardiac arrest) at a flip of a switch. If you must, Goodluck!

MeekAndMild
December 7, 2008, 11:19 AM
After dark wasps aren't active so when I need to clear a nest from the barn I wait until night time then hit it with a shot of foaming wasp spray. Have removed several wasp nests up to a foot wide that way and inactivated several underground yellow jacket nests through the years; I'd presume hornets would respond to similar tactics.

In recovering a nest just remember that the wasp pupae will continue to hatch out so it should be left outside and re-sprayed for a few days as needed until all are killed.

Of course back in the old days we'd just find wasp nests and come back after dark to knock them down, recover them when the adults flew off then pick out the larvae and pupae to use as fishbait. Bream really love eating immature wasps. :D But the ones nearly ready to hatch can still sting so there's an art to hooking them without touching them.

Capt Charlie
December 7, 2008, 01:23 PM
:D

I distinctly remember one particular day of squirrel hunting in my youth. It was a slow day and nothing was moving. Now everyone (except kids) knows that bored kids tend to do stupid things.

Darn! A shotgun, plenty of ammo, and nothing to shoot. Wait a minute; that basket ball sized hornet's nest looks like a fun target! One round of #6 shot at about 20 yards should do it.

Folks, those hornets didn't even stop to wonder where it came from. It was like there was a big neon sign pointing directly at me! :eek:

Now I wasn't normally a very fast runner, nor was I all that great a jumper, but with that little bit of "incentive", I would've done the US Olympic Team proud ;).

I cleared a 3 strand barbed wire fence like it wasn't even there and didn't stop running until I was pretty sure I'd left the country :D. And, I got away with only a couple of stings.

Still, you can't run that fast all burdened down with guns & ammo, so that remained behind.... somewhere.... scattered. Well, I didn't think that old single shot Savage was worth my life, but my dad had other ideas. Hours later, I was able to retrieve it.

To this day, I'm not sure which is worse: Hornet stings, or my dad's belt :eek: :D.

I'm with most of the others here; leave sleeping hornets lie, but if you absolutely must,...

Well, if Sis or Grand Ma has an epi-pen laying around it might be a nice piece of insurance to take with you.

Good advice there, and I'm not joking about that.

sureshots
December 7, 2008, 01:45 PM
Play with them all you want. Please have friend video the ACTION for us to enjoy. I take it that you have never been stung by A hornet. I have and believe me its no fun. If you are not lucky you could get stung by more than one. Seriously if the nest is active its best to avoid it.

hoytinak
December 7, 2008, 01:56 PM
Play with them all you want. Please have friend video the ACTION for us to enjoy.

The best idear yet! :D

VaFisher
December 7, 2008, 02:08 PM
If you want to keep nest intact,don`t spray it. WAIT TILL DARK. If you can reach it with step ladder ,take two heavy trash bags,put one inside of other. Being as careful as you can,open bags and not touching sides of nest,enclose nest in bags clear up to attaching twig and seal bag around twig. Break twig off above bag. Leave bags seals tightly to sufocate bees. I`ve left them sealed better than a week and still heard buzzing in bag. Usually a couple weeks is good but shake bag before opening and listen for buzzing. FYI if your allergic to stings don`t fool with it. If your not be aware that multiple stings can be fatal. Anyone stung multiple times(whether having trouble breathing or not) should go to ER and be monitored. Things can go very bad (cardiac arrest) at a flip of a switch. If you must, Goodluck!

This works for me also and it more then likely the safest way to do this without messing it up with sprays.

Double Naught Spy
December 7, 2008, 05:45 PM
I feel a Darwin Award is just around the corner....

dirty magazine
December 7, 2008, 06:00 PM
So what are you going to do with this hornet's nest when you get it?

I can understand if you were harvesting honey or the nest was too close to a hide, but it seems like a senseless act of vandalism to me.

and what does WMA stand for?

hogdogs
December 7, 2008, 06:29 PM
DM, A hornets nest of this size is a very nice rustic knick knack for the mantle. Not hardly vandalism. It also is not a bees nest so no honey. If it contained honey you would be doing GREAT harm to the wild honey bee population and I would frown on you for that. WMA is a wildlife management area. In many it is illegal to find a flint arrow head and keep it or to harvest rotting wood for decoration or firewood.
Brent

Double Naught Spy
December 7, 2008, 08:28 PM
Since you have to have a permit to get in, then you should have had a copy of the regulations governing your activities in 12 Mile Swamp and if you had the regulations, you should have read them...


http://myfwc.com/hunting/wma/2008-09/Northeast/TwelveMileSwamp.pdf

5. No person shall cut, damage, or remove any natural, man-made or cultural resource without written authorization of the landowner or primary land manager.
Do you have permission for the removal of the nest? If not, the activity you plan is prohibited.

7. The wanton and willful waste of wildlife is prohibited.
Stealing the nest and resulting kill of the hornets is against the rules.

johnwilliamson062
December 7, 2008, 10:46 PM
If you are going to do something illegal and stupid, just make sure you videotape it so we can all have a good laugh. The prosecutor will thank you also.

schutzen
December 7, 2008, 11:51 PM
If you really want that hornets nest, this works. Get a 55 gallon heavy duty drum liner (4-6 mil thick), at wire tie, and a bug bomb that will kill hornets.
At night, carefully trim the supporting limb back to the point you can slip the drum liner over the nest. Draw the top of the drum liner around the supporting limb, activate the bug bomb and drop it into the drum liner. Wire tie the drum liner shut against the supporting tree limb. Come back the next day to collect your nest. You need to do this at night or the "guard hornets" will really get your attention. Just another country hick's 2 cents worth.

PS; This works well for the guys up north too. It is really good insurance that the “dead” hornets nest is really dead before you bring it inside.

Powderman
December 8, 2008, 05:36 AM
Be real careful.

You don't want to disturb the nest and have a bunch of them coming out at you. Here's a picture of a Hornet with its stinger deployed, in the process of striking!

http://www.zianet.com/rolfkap/aviation/f18/f18-03.jpg

Hornets move really fast, and their stings can be downright painful and sometimes fatal.

:eek:;)

thallub
December 8, 2008, 07:34 AM
Leave thet hornet's nest alone.

Went to a one room school in WV for 6 years. Our teacher was a witch: She would fly off the handle and beat butts for no good reason. She was especially hard on my brother and I. It was near Halloween and she demanded that my brother and I help with decorating the school.

As we walked over the hill to school we one morning we took the huge bald Hornet's nest from a tree with about three feet of the branch it was hanging on. There had been several frosts at that time.

Everything went neat at school until about 09:30 when the hornets warmed up. We got a two day vacation from school until the exterminators could get there to take care of the hornets. Yep, teach got nailed a few times when she tried to get the nest out of the building.

bswiv
December 8, 2008, 09:36 PM
Well.....................

Have done some more research on the nest issue.

What I found is that they are abandoned some time during the winter, even in NE Fl. That being the case it seems a good plan to go check it in a couple of weeks, maybe after we've had a hard freeze or two, and see if it's still active.

And I'll admit that it never occured to me that it might be against FWC regulations to harvest a nest, even though in retrospect it does make sense that if it's still active that would constitute a violation of some sort. So what I'll do is, while I'm waiting for the nest to become inactive, I will get ahold of the FWC officer that works the area and see what he says.

If he says no then that's the end of it.

If he says yes then I'll let you know how it all turns out.

bswiv
December 8, 2008, 09:45 PM
This from the University of Florida web site..........."

See the last couple of lines. Seems they really do abandon the nest in the fall, at least according to the folks at UF. That being the case, and knowing that the nest, once abandoned and no longer afforded the upkeep needed by the hornets will quickly deterorate, it seems reasonable that the FWC officer should let it be collected. Will have to ask..............

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Colonies are founded in the spring by a single queen that mated the previous fall and overwintered as an adult, usually under the bark of a log. Nests may be aerial or terrestrial, depending in part upon the species of the wasp. Some species may construct both types of nest. Regardless of location, each nest is a series of horizontal combs completely surrounded by a paper envelope. Initially, the solitary queen must not only construct the paper brood cells, but also forage for food, lay eggs, feed her progeny, and defend the next from intruders. When the first offspring emerge as adults they assume all tasks except egg laying. The queen devotes the remainder of her life to this task and does not leave the nest again. For most of the season the colony consists of sterile worker females which are noticeably smaller than the queen. Each worker tends to persist at a given task, such as nest building or feeding larvae, for a given day, but may change tasks if the need arises. Working habits apparently are not associated with age as they are in the honeybee. Workers progressively feed larvae a diet of masticated flesh of adult and immature insects, other arthropods, and fresh carrion. Lepidopterous larvae appear to be a favorite food. In autumn, larger cells are constructed for the crop of new queens. Larvae in these cells receive more food than do those in normal cells. At the same time, the queen begins to lay unfertilized or male eggs in either large or small cells. After emergence, the new queens mate and seek shelter for the winter. These will be the founders of next spring's colonies. The old founder queen dies, and the workers begin to behave erratically until social order breaks down. With winter's arrival, the remaining colony dies.

publius
December 8, 2008, 10:07 PM
I think schutzen's idea is the best. My grandfather had a big one in his office that had been given to him. I think he said the person who gave it to him "smoked" the few hornets that were in the nest in the winter out with a torch soaked with burnt motor oil. The hornets just fell harmlessly to the ground in the cold ???

grymster2007
December 8, 2008, 10:57 PM
Macho as I may seem I can scream, squeal and run like a girl!

What? I thought that was SOP for you! :p

guntotin_fool
December 8, 2008, 11:09 PM
try a smoky fire under the nest. I found a rag soaked in brake fluid smoldered and made a ton of smoke, placed inside a coffee can, it will drive them away so you can move or destroy the nest.

phil mcwilliam
December 9, 2008, 02:42 AM
My favorite tried & proven method for dealing with hornets nests is as others have said - wait till its dark when their not active. I grab a can of ordinary fly spray & a cigarette lighter. A good couple of seconds blast with this flame thrower generally renders the entire nest empty. Then go about removing it. Be careful.

jdscholer
December 9, 2008, 09:35 AM
Darn! A shotgun, plenty of ammo, and nothing to shoot. Wait a minute; that basket ball sized hornet's nest looks like a fun target! One round of #6 shot at about 20 yards should do it.
Now I suppose we're going to start the debate on what firearm, caliber, bullet weight, shot size, etc. is adequate to safely hunt hornet nests.:) I'm in.
My vote is for nothing less than 12 ga., with #9 shot. The more the better. jd

vytoland
December 9, 2008, 10:33 AM
I just have to do this thing

sounds like a great idea.........those hornets are much smaller than you are..........nothing more than a tiny pin prick.......you just knock that nest down and show em who is the boss..........and remember a REAL man does not run from danger:p

Pathfinder45
December 10, 2008, 03:48 AM
If you get into this over your head you could get seriously hurt. Wait 'til the nest is abandoned if you must have it.

johnnypi45
December 10, 2008, 10:43 AM
Now I suppose we're going to start the debate on what firearm, caliber, bullet weight, shot size, etc. is adequate to safely hunt hornet nests.

Rifle:

My friends, I propose that the proper hornet hunting firearm be any centerfire caliber rifle, capable of greater than 150 yrd. MOA.

Tactics:

-From at least 150 yrds off, shoot branch leading to hornet nest. A challenging shot for most, this is what separates a good hornet hunter from a great one.
-Ensure that the hornet nest has in fact fallen to the ground.
-Also ensure that the hornet nest has fallen onto the strategically placed pound of tannerite
-Shoot tannerite.....
-Pray all hornets are DRT and not ****** off...
-So goes hornet hunting.........


Petey