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View Full Version : Help a new guy with shell etiquette


johnnyeastside
December 6, 2008, 08:28 PM
I'm a new gun owner (Mossberg 500). How careful do I need to be with the shells. Give me some do's and don'ts please.

B. Lahey
December 6, 2008, 08:43 PM
Don't hit go pounding on the primer or soaking them in WD40 and everything should be fine. Stored in a cool dry place they will last pretty much forever.

hogdogs
December 6, 2008, 08:48 PM
If you mean how delicate are they? they are durable. The risk is if they were to fall and land directly on the primer real hard. Keep them from sitting in liquid chemicals and WD-40 is a primer neutering substance...
Get more specific for more info...:D
Brent

johnnyeastside
December 6, 2008, 08:54 PM
Yeah, that's pretty much what I wanted to know. How durable, what if dropped, etc. Sometimes on forums like this, I don't get very specific, which can lead to varied responses and more info. Know what I mean? Just want to learn handling habits for the shells. The first time I unloaded the gun and saw how they are ejected it raised these questions..
Thanks.

ZeSpectre
December 6, 2008, 08:58 PM
They are pretty darned tough and usually sealed very well. The only folks I've heard of who "killed" a modern shotgun shell were duck hunters who'd had their shells soaking in water all day (wet jacket or similar) without realizing it and even then I've only heard a couple of stories.

gustav129
December 6, 2008, 09:37 PM
They are pretty darned tough and usually sealed very well. The only folks I've heard of who "killed" a modern shotgun shell were duck hunters who'd had their shells soaking in water all day (wet jacket or similar) without realizing it and even then I've only heard a couple of stories.

One of my hunting partners forgot his shell pouch one day while duck hunting. We hunted near the spot 2 weeks later, so we looked for them on the way back. He didn't keep the shells, as they were all rusted up.

Tatsumi67
December 6, 2008, 09:43 PM
First, I recommend you take some training on how to properly handle a gun (unless your folks taught you or something, even then I still recommend it) like the NRA certification state courses and things. My policy is, I dont go hunting or to the range with anyone who doesnt have the training (or something equivelent).

Second. Shotgun shells (today) are alot more durable than they look. Invest in an ammo can (milsurp) and store them in a tight,sealed, dry container in a stable environment. As long as you dont do anything reckless or stupid with ammo, nothing bad happens.

I knew this idi-I mean former acquaitence who almost lost his face when try to pry open a live shell with a screw driver...stupid stupid stupid. I dont know why he did it, just dont repeat his mistakes.

publius
December 6, 2008, 09:55 PM
They are very tough, I've submerged them in water, dropped them on asphalt and pretty much everything you shouldn't do and have had maybe a couple of misfires. I have had some so rusted or muddy I threw them away, but keep them clean and dry and don't worry about dropping them.

gustav129
December 6, 2008, 09:59 PM
I knew this idi-I mean former acquaitence who almost lost his face when try to pry open a live shell with a screw driver...stupid stupid stupid. I dont know why he did it, just dont repeat his mistakes.

Sounds like an idiot to me...

jrothWA
December 7, 2008, 12:36 AM
with public hours fort trap & skeet.
SHow up and introduce yourself, DON't be shy about helping open the traps up or carrying boxes of clay targets.

Ask questions and listen to the answers and ask more.
Observe some trap or skeet to understand the game. then try with a small group.

guntotin_fool
December 7, 2008, 04:20 AM
I too suggest visiting a local clay club, most of us shooters are VERY willing to help, and will often take the opportunity to do everything we can to get you started right,

This is a little bit selfish, as we want you to be as safe as we are when we are on the range, and getting you started right hopefully limits the chances you shooting us in the back when we are on the line. (only kidding a little bit__)

BUT it is true that we like to help newbies. or at least most of us do.


If you run into the odd one who says your gun is junk, and you need a 2700 dollar "starter" gun, just nod and say thanks for the insight, and walk over to another group and chat, most likely they will have the same opinion of the "expert" you just talked to as you now have, and they will help.


Do not be afraid of saying "hey I am a COMPLETE MORON when it comes to this, and I want to learn to do it right" Start at the beginning, and work your way up. Its fun, and once you get into it, its only slightly less addicting than say Crack or Meth.....


list where you live, you may find that one of us lives real near you and will be more than willing to set up a meeting and a range day.

johnwilliamson062
December 7, 2008, 12:09 PM
There is a lot of subtle etiquette in trap/clays. Not going to take you long to pick it up and it is pretty common sense, but if you are going to go shoot trap without knowing what you are doing I would be humble and ask for help with safety and pointers right off the bat.

zippy13
December 7, 2008, 01:05 PM
Considering shell etiquette at the local shotgun gun club, here's some don'ts to ponder:

Don't arrive at the club with a loaded gun. If you pull your gun out of it's case and shuck out a mag full of shells, you'll most likely be treated like you have a very aggressive communicable disease. Don't violate the safety rules. If at a new club, it's wise to read their rules before you get out your gun. If you have any questions, ask the rangemaster. Don't shoot inappropriate ammo, target shooters don't wanna have magnums going off around them. And, the club may have specific rules about ammo. Heavy loads may drop shot beyond the club's safety zone. And, a few clubs required non-toxic loads. Don't make the newbie mistake of loading before you get on station. Keep your gun unloaded and the action open until it's your turn to shoot and you're on station. Don't shoot from the shell box. Use a shooting vest or shell pouch. Shooting with carpenter's nail bags is better than trying to stuff 25 shells/hulls into the pockets of your jeans. The club may have loaner vests and/or bags. Don't get caught short, have a few extra shells with you. It's not unusual to have the target you just shot called "no target" and you get a mulligan (do-over). So, you may need mulligan shells. Also, extra shells may be needed if you re-shoot a pair because of a second shot malfunction. Have you ever noticed shooting vests and shell bags with two shell loops stitched in? They are for your mulligan shells.
Don't cycle your singles thru the mag, just plop your shell in the slot and close the action. Newbies unnecessarily cycling their pumps just slows things down.
Don't eject your hulls all over the place. Learn to eject with your hand over the port and catch your hulls. Don't pick up your grounded hulls until you observe the other shooters. Different clubs have different rules: Some clubs don't want your hulls littering their grass and want you to police them as you shoot. Other clubs don't want you spending time picking up your hulls. Don't expect the next squad to be happy if they have to wait for you to collect your empties. Some clubs don't allow grounded hulls to be harvested. You'd be surprised how many "vegetable pickers" walk directly in front to the low house window when collecting hulls near Station 7 of a Skeet field.DO be safe and have a great time with your new gun.

drail
December 7, 2008, 03:39 PM
Zippy13, thank you for your excellent post.That is exactly the kind of thing that new shooters need to be aware of. Big thumbs up!!!