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View Full Version : Benelli Nova vs Supernova? 870, Mossberg...


sierra 18
December 1, 2008, 07:25 AM
Morning gents:

I'm looking to buy a 12 g shotgun for duck and goose. Looking around, I've come across the Benelli Nova and Supernova. They seem like pretty good shotguns overall and come with a set of 3 internal choke tubes.

The Supernova, according the sales people, has a better recoil absorption system in addition to a two-lug rotary bolt head that locks up steel to steel inside the barrel for positive lock up. The Super Nova is about $130.00 more than the Nova. I wonder if its worth the extra money?

And I see a lot of support on this forum for the 870 and the Mossberg for waterfowl hunting, so feel free to weigh in with your vote for best choice.

Thanks,

Chris

zippy13
December 1, 2008, 01:05 PM
I think you'll find that the Benelli supporters are fans of their fast action, low recoil semi-auto shotguns. There is little talk about their pump guns for hunting. Slide action conversation is usually about the Mossberg and Remington offerings with some Browning fans voicing their opinions.

You need to be more specific when referring to Remington 870s. Think of it as a line of guns, not a specific model. They're available in broad price range. For your purposes, assuming you want 3-1/2 inch magnum capability, the top dog would be the:
870 Super Magnum XCS (Xtreme Conditions Shotgun) Waterfowl edition (item 81310 - MSRP $995)
An 870 Express Super Mag Waterfowl Camo with a MSRP of $572, will work for you, too.
The 870 Express Super Mag (item 25100) is Plain Jane wood stock gun with a MSRP of $420.

Mossberg is more consistent with their 835 Ulti-Mag series. Waterfowl models range in MSRP form $432 to $559.

Browning offers their BPS, Mossy Oak Duck Blind version at a MSRP of $789.
If you're really serious about your waterfowl shooting, Browning has the same BPS Oak Duck Blind gun in 10-ga for the same price as the 12-ga!

aeonrevolution
December 1, 2008, 01:17 PM
I have the Nova and have fired a SuperNova. I think the recoil bit is half BS and half truth. There really isn't that big of a difference in my opinion...

Just depends on what you're looking for.

sierra 18
December 1, 2008, 01:17 PM
Thanks for the reply. As for the 870, quite right, I should have been more specific. I've seen the 870 Express Supermag which would be more than enough.

I need to look at the Mossbergs; I've been reading a lot or postings here where this brand of shotgun is a very popular choice.

I'd be going with either a pump or a semi-auto. The O/U from what I've seen tend to be much more than I want to spend.

One of the lads I'd be hunting with has a Beretta semi-auto but not a magnum. There seems to be some debate as to whether the magnum is a must.

I'll keep looking, keep reading and looking for more input to my question.

Thanks all,

Chris

zippy13
December 1, 2008, 05:01 PM
There's a little confusion over what's a 12-ga magnum. These days 12-ga guns are typically available in three chamber lengths: 2-3/4, 3 and 3-1/2 inch. The 2-2/4 inch chambers are generally used for target guns, but there are plenty of non-toxic loads in 2-2/4 available. And, most field guns are chambered for 3 inch shells, there were once known as 12-ga magnums. There are many 3 inch loads suitable for ducks and geese on the market. These will deliver more shot on target than the 2-3/4 shells and more recoil to your shoulder. The 12-ga guns with 3 1/2 inch chambers are commonly called super mags, with non-toxic loads of 2-oz, they are quite formidable.
Before you decide on a 3-1/2 gun, perhaps you should do some test firing. You may find that a 3-1/2 inch is more gun that you really want, and a 12-ga 3 inch meets your needs, so why pay extra for a 3 1/2?

sierra 18
December 1, 2008, 05:12 PM
I agree with you there. I've fired the 3" and the 3.5", and I think for my needs, the 3" is plenty. Everyone in the duck hunting group I'd be joining uses a 3" chamber except for one who has the 3.5" and finds the recoil a bit much.

If I can't hit 'em with the shot in the 3"..........

Interesting too about aeonrevolution's comments that there isn't that much difference in the Nova and SN. I haven't had a chance to test fire these side by side, I'm sure that at my size (XL) and ability, the Nova would be fine.

Thanks for the input gents,

C

BigJimP
December 1, 2008, 05:16 PM
The superNova is worth the extra money if it has the comfort tech recoil supression system in it. The system works very well - and it will make a difference. Benelli makes a good gun.

The 870 Express is the "low end" entry in the 870 lineup / with the Rem 870 Wingmaster at the high end. The Browning BPS is selling new for around $ 500 and its comparable to the 870 Wingmaster in my opinion.

As you go up in price, in general, you will find some better steel in the internal components, better finishing on the final product, etc. Like Zippy13 advised 3" guns can shoot 3" or 2 3/4" shells - and there are lots of ammo options out there - including magnum loads. If you want to shoot 3 1/2" magnums - for geese especially - then you will need a gun chambered in
3 1/2". Personally, I think a gun chambered in 3" is fine.

All of the better semi-autos will cost you more than the pumps - realistically around $1,000 - $1500 probably depending on the model you like / but sort thru the Remington, Browning, Benelli, etc lineups and see what you like. Its the same issue on chamber length - regardless. In the Benelli lineup - the super black eagle, the M2 are all popular waterfowling models - and I would make sure it had the comfort tech system in it ( synthetic stocks have it / not wood stocks ).

gustav129
December 1, 2008, 07:14 PM
I have a Mossberg 835 Ulti-mag, my two hunting partners have a Rem 870, and a Winchester 1100(I believe, a Win semi?). All of us shoot 3-1/2 mags. But these guns are chambered to use shorter shells too. I use my 835 with 2-2 3/4" and 1 3" in the tube for pheasant hunting.

Don't let anybody tell you not to buy a 3 1/2 mag shot gun because it's "too big of a gun." I started off shooting 3 1/2" turkey mags, that left my whole sholder bruised. If you feel that you might not handle shooting a 3 1/2" for very long, bring 3" shells with you. As you get more comfortable, then you can step up, and not have to buy a new gun.

BigJimP
December 1, 2008, 07:24 PM
Nobody said anything about a 3 1/2" chambered gun being too big a gun ...the question is whether its necessary to shoot 3 1/2" shells or if you can get everything you need out of 3" shells in terms of waterfowling or Turkey's for that matter.

Any gun chambered in 3 1/2" will shoot 2 3/4" or 3" shells - it isn't anything special.

Recoil is primarily a function of the velocity of the shot charge, the weight of the shot charge and the weight of the gun. Shooting a 3 1/2" shell isn't necessarily any more recoil than shooting a 3" shell ( heck even women can do it ...). If he wants a gun chambered in 3 1/2" then that's what he should buy / but its usually a premium price over a gun chambered at 3".

Personally, I don't think 3 1/2" shells are necessary and I've killed plenty of ducks and geese over the years with 3" shells.

As a note - if you have any bruises from shooting magnum loads or any kind of load - there is something wrong with the fit of your shotgun and it should be corrected. I'm 6'5" and 290 lbs - but even shooting light loads in a gun that doesn't fit right - can beat the stuffing out of somebody even as big as I am. Expecting to have bruises from shooting a shotgun is really "old school" - and I'm way old enough to remember that mentality from the 50's - but it makes no sense today with what most of us know about "gun fit". Respectfully, I'd suggest you visit a gun club or talk to someone that knows a little about "gun fit".

gustav129
December 1, 2008, 09:12 PM
Nobody said anything about a 3 1/2" chambered gun being too big a gun
Before you decide on a 3-1/2 gun, perhaps you should do some test firing. You may find that a 3-1/2 inch is more gun that you really want, and a 12-ga 3 inch meets your needs, so why pay extra for a 3 1/2?


As for the bruised sholder, that was the one time, and it was the first time I shot a 3 1/2, and I didn't know what kind of a kick to expect. I was probably holding it wrong, and I have a small frame which laves me with not much padding on my collar bones.

sierra 18
December 2, 2008, 08:05 AM
I hear you. My friends are saying the same thing--why pay the premium for 3.5"--when the 3" shell does just fine in taking waterfowl?

Still, nice to have the 3.5 and have the option of shooting 3" loads and upping to 3.5 if the situation requires it.

Ah, choices, choices.

C

zippy13
December 2, 2008, 12:27 PM
Don't let anybody tell you not to buy a 3 1/2 mag shot gun because it's "too big of a gun." I started off shooting 3 1/2" turkey mags, that left my whole sholder bruised. If you feel that you might not handle shooting a 3 1/2" for very long, bring 3" shells with you. As you get more comfortable, then you can step up, and not have to buy a new gun.

You misconstrued my suggestion, I wasn't trying to tell anyone that a 3 1/2-inch is too much gun. As a matter of economy, if a 3-inch will do nicely, why pony-up the extra $$$ for a 3 1/2 inch chamber gun?

I suspect, if all the BPSs, M-500s and R-870s gave you the option of having a 3 1/2-inch chamber for the same price as a 3, then the sales of 3 1/2 inch guns would skyrocket. But, the sales of 3 1/2 inch ammo would not increase proportionally.

It's easy to be over gunned for a specific situation. Many folks select a 28-ga gun, over a 12 or 20, for small birds, even with the higher ammo cost. Here's a video of a classic example of being over gunned, click here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_mzLagHJOI). :D

gustav129
December 2, 2008, 07:42 PM
http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/shotguns/model_870/model_870_express_super_magnum_waterfowl_camo.asp

Really nice 3 1/2" 870 for just over $500. They go on sale for around $400 quite often around here.

The Regular 870 Express retails at $375.

So if it's on sale at Joe's or some other big sporting goods store, get what you can get for only $25 more.

Death from Afar
December 2, 2008, 09:20 PM
I used a nova on a rabbit shoot a few years back. Really really nice gun, fast handling, and while expensive, high quality of finish. They look a bit funny mind you, but if i did already have my "hose of death 870", they would be a serious contender.

3.5 inch magnums are pretty ouch when you pull the loud lever. I have yet to see some huge advantge, but if you can stomach recoil and cost more pellets in the air can never be a bad thing.

wpcexpert
December 2, 2008, 09:54 PM
My wife bought me a Nova 3.5 for my birthday. Duck camo. Smooth looking gun. Cycles very nice. So I got a xxfull turky choke for it. Turkey was the primary purpose for the gun.

So I went out to the back yard and shot the shotgun off the bench, to check the pattern...I nearly dropped the durn thing. I'll tell you what, I shoot all the time, but that 3.5 in Win turkey load kicked more than my dad's 444 Marlin. I had to shoot it again cause the wife was watching. I wanted to cry.

But I did end up taking it to the duck blind yesterday and ran 3 inch shells thru it. No problems. We limited out and it took my limit of birds. It will be going back with me next time.

I am looking for the Mercury recoil reducer for it though. So I would pay the extra for the Super Nova. I think that's what the SN has in it.

DBR
December 2, 2008, 11:18 PM
"Limbsaver" makes a recoil pad for the Nova. It makes a big difference.

singlestack45
December 3, 2008, 04:55 PM
I would go with the Nova.

publius
December 3, 2008, 05:06 PM
Supernova- A thermonuclear explosion caused by the collision of a white dwarf star with another nearby star.:rolleyes: Seriously, I ahve an 870, 835, and a Nova. I like the design of the 870 best, the barrel of the 835, and the plastic receiver on the nova. I generally use the 870. don't like the feel or looks of the Nova and even though the 835 shoots the best it rattles and rusts easier than the 'ol 870.